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jdepic
04-07-2006, 04:03 PM
Can anyone tell me if a bird of paradise can be cut back and re-grow quickly,
much like a banana tree? Thanks.

Desertdweller
04-07-2006, 07:16 PM
Ours are always cut back in the late winter and usually by early summer are back to almost the precut size.

Kate Butler
04-07-2006, 08:25 PM
Often, after big storms, they require being cut down due to breakage. They should regrow fine - although not usually as quickly as bananas (musa sp.)

Az Gardener
04-07-2006, 08:50 PM
Ours are always cut back in the late winter and usually by early summer are back to almost the precut size.
I think they are talking about Tropical bird of Paradise, not our Mexican Birds, Cesiapena Sp. I think?

Desertdweller
04-08-2006, 10:39 AM
I wondered about that banana tree comment :) What do I know I'm just a ditch digger.

Kate Butler
04-08-2006, 12:52 PM
I was guessing (from the Florida address) that you meant strelitizia rather than the caesalpina. Please excuse the confusion.

The caesalpina is a woody shrub (I always heard it called 'dwarf poinciana'), the strelitzia is a succulent herbaceous plant (much like a banana 'tree'). Both can be grown in much of Florida.

jdepic
04-10-2006, 01:51 PM
Yes, It's the strelitzia, so I'm guessing it can be cut back and regrow? thanks.

yamadooski
04-12-2006, 11:07 PM
Yes it can be cut back.
Alot of mine had a lot of frost damage from a few weeks ago and I trimmed all the dead leaves off and now we have new shoots coming out.

Rule of thumb in Florida as long as the roots are in the ground anything will come back.:clapping:

South Florida Lawns
04-12-2006, 11:32 PM
I do but never take them too the ground.

Depending on the conditions, for instance one customer has one in sandy and dry soil, it takes close to a month in growing season to get some new growth and fill back out.

Then in moist topsoil I have cut the bird and have seen a quick turn around and full new growth in half the time.

sancho_man_orlando
05-08-2007, 02:31 AM
The Ole Bumperooonie!

What do you cut this back with?

How far back do you cut it?

I have a client in an upscale neighborhood with lakefront views that has 2 sections in his poolscape. Each section has 3 tall birds of paradise. 1 in particular is about to start touching the top of the screened enclosure. My customer has asked what I suggest. I told him it should be cut back. He wants me to work up a quote.

Not sure how to proceed.

yamadooski
05-08-2007, 09:00 PM
You can take a shovel and cut off that big one and transplant on the outside of the pool cage.
I would transpant the whole thing if I was the landscaper.
I would then plant an orange bird instead of a white one.
The orange will only get 4-5 feet at the tallest.
If the white bird is to heavy to transplant I will come over with the Bobcate and take out the screen and lift it our for you.
PM me if you need help
Im In Tampa actually on the east side so Orlando is only 1 hour away.

Kate Butler
05-08-2007, 10:16 PM
You can take a shovel and cut off that big one and transplant on the outside of the pool cage.
I would transpant the whole thing if I was the landscaper.
I would then plant an orange bird instead of a white one.
The orange will only get 4-5 feet at the tallest.
If the white bird is to heavy to transplant I will come over with the Bobcate and take out the screen and lift it our for you.
PM me if you need help
Im In Tampa actually on the east side so Orlando is only 1 hour away.

White birds of paradise will become WAY too big for any screened enclosure that isn't at least 2 stories tall. Yamadooski is right: get it out and replace with the orange form.

sancho_man_orlando
05-08-2007, 10:22 PM
does it need to be pulled by roots? or can i chop it away with the shovel?

if it's chopped away will it retake if transplanted?

Kate Butler
05-08-2007, 10:56 PM
I took a chainsaw to a white bird last winter and it did NOT come back. It thought about it (pushed about 2' of new growth) but it was just too much work and it died back. If you can chop it with a shovel, you need to change your screen name to the incredible hulk. Although, if it hasn't 'trunked up' yet, you probably could do it with a really sharp shovel.

Chainsawing it was VERY messy - lots of wet, pulpy debris going in all directions. Might not be the best choice of method inside a screened area.

rob7233
05-15-2007, 05:22 PM
I recently had this same situation happen with a with White bird and a Philodendren in the same triangular 5' x 4' planter area. The philodendren had all it's roots going between and intertwined around the Bird which broke thru the screen in two places.

The problem here was access. The screen enclosure was set to where the yard dropped off at that corner. The cost and trouble of a small Bob-cat was a no go. The client wanted it out without furthering damaging the screen more. So I took a large serrated knife ($6.00) bought at Walmart and reduced it as much as possible then finished it off at the ground level with the chainsaw.

No way was a shovel going to do it. I don't care how big OR green I might be. Way too much plant material in too small a space with three sides of it limited in access. 2-screen, 1-pool water. FYI: I use this knife often, to divide/reduce Liriope etc. Plus think of all the potential "other" uses for it.. In the end, we just used one of their other large potted plants in the area.

Kate Butler
05-15-2007, 10:13 PM
I use a long serrated knife ALL THE TIME working in the nursery for dividing large clumps of perennials. Smaller similar knives make really good weeding implements.

If I were to do it again, though, I'd use a large hand pruning saw - like a Silky - incredibly sharp buggers. Just bought one recently and I cannot believe how useful it is!!!