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jonspolaris
04-14-2006, 02:08 PM
I turned the water on to our sprinklers today and a zone came on, even though the controll box was turned off. I am assuming it is a valve or soloniod that is stuck open.
The valves are rainbird 2" PGA valves.
Would replacing the solenoid fix this?

thanks

jerryrwm
04-14-2006, 02:38 PM
The solenoid may have been left in the open position, or the bleed screw is open. Check those.

There may be some trash under the diaphragm, or under the solenoid actuactor. Shut the water off and remove the solenoid and check to see that it is clean. If it is clean then you will need to take the valve apart and clean the diaphragm seat. Also check to see that the diaphragm is not ripped or torn.

Critical Care
04-14-2006, 06:19 PM
This makes me think of a problem that I had yesterday when somehow I accidentally got the solenoid on a Hunter PGV valve cross threaded. Never had that happen before, and I was a bit ticked about it being so easy to do.

I’m beginning to think that perhaps it would be wise to have something handy that could chase the threads on these solenoids.

PurpHaze
04-14-2006, 07:55 PM
This makes me think of a problem that I had yesterday when somehow I accidentally got the solenoid on a Hunter PGV valve cross threaded. Never had that happen before, and I was a bit ticked about it being so easy to do.

Iím beginning to think that perhaps it would be wise to have something handy that could chase the threads on these solenoids.

A steadier hand maybe? :laugh:

PurpHaze
04-14-2006, 08:04 PM
Rainbird recommends the following for that particular valve.

Water will not shut off.

Controller may be operating the valve automatically.
Check controller to confirm it is turned off.

Valve is set in the manual “ON” position.
Use finger-tight pressure to turn the solenoid clockwise to the “OFF” position. CAUTION: Over-tightening risks the possibility of damaging the solenoid seat. Re-tighten bleed screw on top of valve if leakage is observed. Verify that the o-ring is not damaged.

Diaphragm filter screen is blocked.
Turn off the water supply and remove the bonnet. Inspect the diaphragm filter screen located on the bottom of the diaphragm. Remove debris, rinse screen in clean water and return diaphragm and bonnet to valve body.

Solenoid is shorted or damaged.
Turn off water supply and turn the solenoid counter-clockwise to remove. Replace with new solenoid by turning clockwise.

For flows below 10 GPM Rain Bird recommends the flow control stem be turned down two full turns from the fully open position.

jonspolaris
04-14-2006, 10:16 PM
Thanks, This Valve and solenoid hasent been touched in several years. It worked find last season. We had another solenoid go bad last year on another zone. The difference was that valve wouldent open at all.

This zone comes on even when the controll box is shut off.
Is replacing a solenoid a complex task?
This one would be about 10 years old.

PurpHaze
04-14-2006, 10:22 PM
Thanks, This Valve and solenoid hasent been touched in several years. It worked find last season. We had another solenoid go bad last year on another zone. The difference was that valve wouldent open at all.

This zone comes on even when the controll box is shut off.
Is replacing a solenoid a complex task?
This one would be about 10 years old.

You just cut the wires, unscrew the old solenoid, screw in the new solenoid and rewire the solenoid with new waterproof connectors. Takes about five minutes if you have easy access to the valve.

Critical Care
04-15-2006, 01:34 AM
A steadier hand maybe? :laugh:

When you get my age, Hayes, nothing is steady!

Az Gardener
04-15-2006, 02:46 AM
We always change the whole bonnet. The logic is, a solenoid is 7-10 bucks diaphragm is 6-8 bucks. I can buy the whole new valve for 12-13 bucks. I am there on a service call 75 bucks. If I replace all the moving parts and thy should be good for another few years. If I just replace a solenoid on a 5 year old valve I saved them 4-5 bucks for now but cost them 75 when later on this summer or next the diaphragm is bad. With a cordless drill it is also a 5-minute job.

jonspolaris
04-15-2006, 08:52 AM
Thanks for all your help. I now need to find a place where I can order these solenoids.
I am assuming that the solenoid went bad and is keeping the valve open.

SprinklerGuy
04-15-2006, 09:25 AM
I do the same AZ Gardner...always have....I use the analogy that if you bought your car part by part by part it would cost way too much money..so you buy the car put together.

I had a PGV valve yesterday that I accidentally pinched the nipple on yesterday and it wouldn't come on....sigh.....these 14 hour days 7 days a week are really getting to me I think.....lesson to be learned...be more careful with your nipples. ;)

Grassmechanic
04-15-2006, 10:28 AM
I turned the water on to our sprinklers today and a zone came on, even though the controll box was turned off. I am assuming it is a valve or soloniod that is stuck open.
The valves are rainbird 2" PGA valves.
Would replacing the solenoid fix this?

thanks
If the solenoid was tight and the water is still is on, unscrew the solenoid completely out and check the o-rings for damage. I've seen this often on PGA valves that have been used manually.

jonspolaris
04-15-2006, 10:35 AM
Ok, I took the solenoid out and it looks ok. I will check the o-rings agian for leaks. The wires are in a greese case and the greese seems to have hardened so I cant pull out the wires.
I wanted to test the solenoid to see if it really was faulty or not.

Thanks agian.

PurpHaze
04-15-2006, 10:56 AM
When you get my age, Hayes, nothing is steady!

LOL... Reminds me of the old joke that as a man gets older his hands get harder and his manhood gets softer. Should be the opposite. :laugh:

PurpHaze
04-15-2006, 11:05 AM
We always change the whole bonnet. The logic is, a solenoid is 7-10 bucks diaphragm is 6-8 bucks. I can buy the whole new valve for 12-13 bucks. I am there on a service call 75 bucks. If I replace all the moving parts and thy should be good for another few years. If I just replace a solenoid on a 5 year old valve I saved them 4-5 bucks for now but cost them 75 when later on this summer or next the diaphragm is bad. With a cordless drill it is also a 5-minute job.

We're in a different situation and there are no service charges so the first thing we try when a valve "hangs up" is to throttle down the flow control a little and see if this allows the valve to shut down on its own. If it does then we'll bypass surgery for the immediate time. Some older valves we've done this with we never have to go back out on.

If the FC throttling doesn't work then we too do a complete "top end" replacement which basically installs a completely new valve minus the body. Of course, unless the body is cracked there are no moving parts and its fine unless the diaphragm seat has been messed up by rocks or something else. And as you indicate it's usually cheaper to do a top end replacement that parts the thing to death.

PurpHaze
04-15-2006, 11:13 AM
Thanks for all your help. I now need to find a place where I can order these solenoids. I am assuming that the solenoid went bad and is keeping the valve open.

I've never used Rainbird valves so I wouldn't be able to guess whether the solenoid is hanging the valve up. We use Irritrol FC-100 and Hunter ICV valves exclusively. I've never seen either of these hang up due to solenoid problems. It's always something internal and we top end these if necessary.

Ok, I took the solenoid out and it looks ok. I will check the o-rings agian for leaks. The wires are in a greese case and the greese seems to have hardened so I cant pull out the wires. I wanted to test the solenoid to see if it really was faulty or not.

Some "gel caps" you can remove the wires and on others you will have to cut the wires. Depends on the type.

Wet_Boots
04-15-2006, 11:17 AM
For different valves, the failures occur differently. Rubber parts on the oldest Richdel flat-diaphragm valves often fail within a short time of each other, so there is a point in changing out all of them at one time. Their solenoids fail much more randomly, and about the only time I'll swap them out as a group is when there is serious rusting (on antisyphon valves, mostly) and/or an intermittent short that won't show itself when anyone's looking.

Critical Care
04-15-2006, 12:34 PM
Jonpolaris, if youíre unsure of the solenoid and have another similar valve in the same valve box, then Iíd just switch one solenoid from one valve to the other. That would tell you something.

Critical Care
04-15-2006, 12:42 PM
Okay Hayes… I know this is a bit off the subject but the other day I met an elderly man in the park who appeared to be in good physical shape. I asked him how he stayed in shape, and he replied, “Oh, I eat well, don’t smoke, and have sex almost every day of the week!”

“Almost every day?” I inquired.

“Yep” he grinned. “Almost Monday… almost Tuesday… almost Wednesday…”

RLSLandscaping
04-16-2006, 09:24 PM
I only got 2months of experience in Florida with my bud over the winter "GPM irrigation LLC Naples FL"... but he is smart as crap...replace the "diaphram" in the valve, very easy...generally with a bad solenoid the certain zone won't turn "on" instead of "not turning off" if a zone won't shut off we would always think "valve diaphram" and u can easily test all yer solenoids from the clock with a volt meter to locate any bad solenoids! good luck :O