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Currier
04-17-2006, 11:51 PM
Any of you have unique tricks to uncover curb stops that have somehow (usually kids with rocks, but sometimes just dirt) become covered with debris. You shine a light down the tube and there is no valve to be seen.

I know some around her have tried shop vacs to suck up debris, one guy used his power washer to clear out the area under the valve and expose the valve.

Any tricks from you all? (other than digging it up...)

sheshovel
04-18-2006, 12:08 AM
I just kinda put on a mud glove and reach down there and scoop the stuff out with my hand..after 1st making sure there is nothing down there that bites or stings.

Dirty Water
04-18-2006, 01:27 AM
I just kinda put on a mud glove and reach down there and scoop the stuff out with my hand..after 1st making sure there is nothing down there that bites or stings.

Your not in cold country. Average curb stops can be 3' down.

I've never had trouble here with debris in curb stop tubes though.

PurpHaze
04-18-2006, 08:07 AM
In non-cold areas the curb stops are not 3' deep so they're a little more accessible. In fact, they often do not have sleeves (what you call "tubes") and are usually contained in rectangle Christy boxes unless it's the older parts of town. Easier access all around.

Now... on other isolation valves we have installed we sometimes get debris down the sleeves. However, these sleeves are usually 4" diameter or larger and can often be cleared out with a small garden spade or trowel. Worse gets to worse we have to dig them up.

DanaMac
04-18-2006, 09:04 AM
Average curb stops can be 3' down.

3'? Heck my 8' key will barely reach some of them here.

Grassmechanic
04-18-2006, 09:32 AM
There is a small, clam-type tool made to clean them out.

SWD
04-18-2006, 03:52 PM
It just goes to show how different parts of the country are all different.
Here in Texas, the curb valves are usually in rectangle boxes larger enough to access easily.
However, so are the rattle snakes, tarantulas and scorpions as well.
I usually stomp on the cover several times, then lift the cover with my valve key while I have a long trenching shovel in my other hand.
Sometimes the customer is watching and wondering just what the hell I'm doing - I have gotten some weird looks at times.
I have found tarantulas larger than the spread of my hand, a 3' rattle snake and a whole nest of scorpions.

bicmudpuppy
04-18-2006, 08:36 PM
It just goes to show how different parts of the country are all different.
Here in Texas, the curb valves are usually in rectangle boxes larger enough to access easily.
However, so are the rattle snakes, tarantulas and scorpions as well.
I usually stomp on the cover several times, then lift the cover with my valve key while I have a long trenching shovel in my other hand.
Sometimes the customer is watching and wondering just what the hell I'm doing - I have gotten some weird looks at times.
I have found tarantulas larger than the spread of my hand, a 3' rattle snake and a whole nest of scorpions.
Here in cold weather country, I worry about varmints in the boxes a lot more during winterizations than during spring turn ons. It is a slow day winterizing when I don't find atleast one snake. Fortunately, I have found very few poisonous snakes. Lake front homes are prone to copper heads and we do see a few rattlesnakes.

PurpHaze
04-18-2006, 09:41 PM
Damn. I only have to put up with the black widows and piss ants. :clapping:

sheshovel
04-18-2006, 10:03 PM
Rattle snakes,Black Widows,Scorpions,And those spiders that if they bite you the poison makes your skin fall off...uumm Brown...uummm Brown...ummm
Brown Recluse spiders!Thems BAD ones!

Dirty Water
04-18-2006, 10:15 PM
Rattle snakes,Black Widows,Scorpions,And those spiders that if they bite you the poison makes your skin fall off...uumm Brown...uummm Brown...ummm
Brown Recluse spiders!Thems BAD ones!

http://cowaro.com/Spider/20040928JVasquez_BR.jpg

Brown Recluse...We have those and widows here.

Don't click on the picture if your a wimp.

bicmudpuppy
04-24-2006, 09:45 AM
http://cowaro.com/Spider/20040928JVasquez_BR.jpg

Brown Recluse...We have those and widows here.

Don't click on the picture if your a wimp.
The severity of the reaction to recluse spider bites varies with the individual (as with most things). I consider myself lucky that I don't react severly to them. They fester and take forever to heal, but I don't swell like some pictures you see, and IF your used to them, avoiding John's picture can be done with treatment. A good anti-biotic application like beta-dine helps. I've got some prescription stuff the doc gives me too for when they fester for longer periods

sheshovel
04-24-2006, 05:07 PM
No you don't understand Mudpup...these are real bad spiders..their poison is different from other spiders.

sheshovel
04-24-2006, 05:11 PM
note the following info on them:From the University of Kansas-

Initially, the bite may feel like a pinprick or go unnoticed. Some may not be aware of the bite for 2 to 8 hours. Others feel a stinging sensation followed by intense pain. Infrequently, some victims experience general systemic reactions that may include restlessness, generalized itching, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, or shock. A small white blister usually initially rises at the bite site surrounded by a swollen area. The affected area enlarges and becomes red, and the tissue is hard to the touch for some time. The lesion from a brown recluse spider bite is a dry, blue-gray or blue-white, irregular sinking patch with ragged edges and surrounding redness--termed the "red, white, and blue sign." The lesion usually is 1½ inches by 2¾ inches or smaller. Characteristics of a bite are further discussed at http://www.amednews.com/free/hlsa0805.

The bite of the brown recluse spider can result in a painful, deep wound that takes a long time to heal. Fatalities are extremely rare, but bites are most dangerous to young children, the elderly, and those in poor physical condition. When there is a severe reaction to the bite, the site can erupt into a "volcano lesion" (a hole in the flesh due to damaged, gangrenous tissue). The open wound may range from the size of an adult's thumbnail to the span of a hand. The dead tissue gradually sloughs away, exposing underlying tissues. The sunken, ulcerating sore may heal slowly up to 6 to 8 weeks. Full recovery may take several months and scarring may remain.

justgeorge
04-24-2006, 05:31 PM
I've only seen one house around here where I had to use a plumber's key, it was 4-5' down. Couldn't see down the tube to see anything, bottom was full of water and mud.. This was last fall doing a blowout, so I ran my air hose down and opened it up full blast. That did the trick.

Fortunately, most POC around here are in the basement.

George

PurpHaze
04-24-2006, 08:18 PM
I've only seen one house around here where I had to use a plumber's key, it was 4-5' down. Couldn't see down the tube to see anything, bottom was full of water and mud.. This was last fall doing a blowout, so I ran my air hose down and opened it up full blast. That did the trick.

Reminds me of what our grounds guys have to go through each year when their fields turn from baseball to football time. Goal posts have to be inserted into sleeves and it doesn't seem to matter whether or not the sleeves are capped because debris finds its way down them. They take a portable compressor and blow the debris out but they use a long wand and stand back. Rocks, needles, condoms and the like routinely fly into the air. :hammerhead:

PurpHaze
04-24-2006, 08:26 PM
A small white blister usually initially rises at the bite site surrounded by a swollen area. The affected area enlarges and becomes red, and the tissue is hard to the touch for some time. The lesion from a brown recluse spider bite is a dry, blue-gray or blue-white, irregular sinking patch with ragged edges and surrounding redness--termed the "red, white, and blue sign." The lesion usually is 1½ inches by 2¾ inches or smaller.

Sounds more like an STD instead of a spider bite. :laugh:

bicmudpuppy
05-04-2006, 12:57 PM
note the following info on them:From the University of Kansas-

Initially, the bite may feel like a pinprick or go unnoticed. Some may not be aware of the bite for 2 to 8 hours. Others feel a stinging sensation followed by intense pain. Infrequently, some victims experience general systemic reactions that may include restlessness, generalized itching, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, or shock. A small white blister usually initially rises at the bite site surrounded by a swollen area. The affected area enlarges and becomes red, and the tissue is hard to the touch for some time. The lesion from a brown recluse spider bite is a dry, blue-gray or blue-white, irregular sinking patch with ragged edges and surrounding redness--termed the "red, white, and blue sign." The lesion usually is 1½ inches by 2¾ inches or smaller. Characteristics of a bite are further discussed at http://www.amednews.com/free/hlsa0805.

The bite of the brown recluse spider can result in a painful, deep wound that takes a long time to heal. Fatalities are extremely rare, but bites are most dangerous to young children, the elderly, and those in poor physical condition. When there is a severe reaction to the bite, the site can erupt into a "volcano lesion" (a hole in the flesh due to damaged, gangrenous tissue). The open wound may range from the size of an adult's thumbnail to the span of a hand. The dead tissue gradually sloughs away, exposing underlying tissues. The sunken, ulcerating sore may heal slowly up to 6 to 8 weeks. Full recovery may take several months and scarring may remain.
The paragraph from right above your quote states that these are rare or severe reactions and not typical. I am very glad I am not in the hypersensitive category. They do still take a very long time to heal and the scars seem to be permanent. Immediate and proper treatment seems to help a lot.