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Bullah
04-23-2006, 08:51 AM
Hey, I am just getting started on this as a part time venture. Have worked for someone else for five years part time; decided to make my own go at it. I have a set of used commercial everything except the mower. The biggest thing. I have enough cash (about 2000.00) to buy a Home Depot John Deere or Craftsman Lawn Mower but I also have good credit and really like the 34' Gravely ZTR for about 5500. with the bagging system and warranty. Comments and suggestions please.

Lumberjack
04-23-2006, 10:19 AM
Get the gravely after you figure out what you have to do to make it pay for itself. It will long out last the homeowner varieties and cut better as well. The bagger you might want to wait on untill you absolutly need it.

Bullah
04-23-2006, 10:26 AM
I think I will need the bagger from the start. My area is dense in pine trees. Many customers want their yards "vacumed" in the off season to make them look good, weather they have leaf bearing trees or not.

QualityLawnCare4u
04-23-2006, 11:02 AM
Do not, I repeat, do NOT buy anything from Lowes or a Craftsman unless you are using it on one yard a week! Put the 2000 Grand on any good commercial or the Gravely should be fine. I would buy used commercial before I would anything from the box stores, and yes I learned this the hard way.

SWD
04-23-2006, 11:05 AM
Use your money wisely - I suggest that providing you have good credit - finance the whole amount of the new machine.
Gravely is offering several attractive financial options, all of which are easy to qualify for with good credit.
To amoritize this cost into your overhead, simply figure out your operating costs by week, and quarter, and this goes in to factoring your service rate.

Bullah
04-23-2006, 01:14 PM
I sense a consenus.

EPIC
04-23-2006, 01:24 PM
pay in cash pay in cash pay in cash ..... get a good used commercail mower the less over head the better

EPIC
04-23-2006, 01:25 PM
or if you have 2g's i would recommend getting a quick 36 mower from better mowers

Splicer
04-23-2006, 01:27 PM
Get what you can get for the cash you have. It will last long enough to pay cash for a commercial unit. Then sell the residential mower for about 1/2 what you paid for it...and get a lawn sweeper. They work oh so well for what you want it for...

bugspit
04-23-2006, 01:38 PM
Hey, I am just getting started on this as a part time venture. Have worked for someone else for five years part time; decided to make my own go at it. I have a set of used commercial everything except the mower. The biggest thing. I have enough cash (about 2000.00) to buy a Home Depot John Deere or Craftsman Lawn Mower but I also have good credit and really like the 34' Gravely ZTR for about 5500. with the bagging system and warranty. Comments and suggestions please.

5 years of employment and you only have 2K saved? :hammerhead:

Use half that cash to get started, keep a $1000.00 in the bank and start a savings program, maybe put your venture off another year.

Debt will get you no where, except deeper in debt.

ALarsh
04-23-2006, 01:43 PM
I wouldn't rule out a JD. I used a JD L130 (homeowner model) for my first and second year and did quite well with it. It cost me $3,000, I put 325 hours on it in 2 seasons and sold it for $2,250. Home Depot had a program where you didn't have to pay for it until 1 year, so if they still are doing that, I would look into it. Cost me $750 to use it for 2 years. I made over triple what I paid for it and bought a new Toro ZTR.

Bullah
04-23-2006, 02:28 PM
Bugspit, have you heard of feeding your children or paying your bills? I began this all with twice that which is remarkable since I was only working on Saturday afternoons. This is also all business money, not milk money. I have my pension. I could buy that Gravely outright, but Im keeping business money in the business account. Its also not in the budget. I do appreciate your concern.

nephilim0167
04-23-2006, 03:54 PM
I'm going to go against what 99% of the people on this site say. I say that if you've got all your numbers figured out, and you've got a plan b c & maybe even d - finance the mower. People say that debt only gets you deeper in debt. I don't always agree with that. My father was raised with the same principals that people here preach and when he was 35 he was making well into 6 digits but had 0 credit because he had always paid cash. He was finally done with the military and wanted to settle down and buy a home and every bank he walked into they laughed him right on out the door. You need to think wisely about how you will repay your loan, and establish even BETTER credit. Being in debt is not a bad thing, unless you dont have the assests to pay it back. Buy a 5500$ mower thats going to bring you in 90-100k a year and I really don't see what the problem is. Like I said, be sure you've got your **** straight. :)

Bullah
04-23-2006, 05:01 PM
Thanks yall, Im going to have to think on this a while. I really do appreciate all of your views.

Willofalltrades
04-23-2006, 05:23 PM
I would say find a good used machine.

dtelawncare
04-23-2006, 05:36 PM
Last year, I was about in the same place, but I have a Craftsman I already had. I started out with it and got the ball rolling. I had about $2000 to spend at the time. I upgraded all my othe equip with the $2000 and financed a new Exmark. At the time they were offering 12 months no payment or interest. I did the math and realized I could pay off the mower before I owed a payment. I understand Gravely has some really good finance offers. Being debt free is always best, but the commercial ZTR will be a lot more efficient. That will allow you to make even more $$ faster. Just do your homework and trust God and you can't go wrong.

Lux Lawn
04-23-2006, 07:27 PM
Get a good commercial mower if you are going to do this for a living.

HOOLIE
04-23-2006, 07:37 PM
I'm going to go against what 99% of the people on this site say. I say that if you've got all your numbers figured out, and you've got a plan b c & maybe even d - finance the mower. People say that debt only gets you deeper in debt. I don't always agree with that. My father was raised with the same principals that people here preach and when he was 35 he was making well into 6 digits but had 0 credit because he had always paid cash. He was finally done with the military and wanted to settle down and buy a home and every bank he walked into they laughed him right on out the door. You need to think wisely about how you will repay your loan, and establish even BETTER credit. Being in debt is not a bad thing, unless you dont have the assests to pay it back. Buy a 5500$ mower thats going to bring you in 90-100k a year and I really don't see what the problem is. Like I said, be sure you've got your **** straight. :)

Exactly...even if you have the cash on hand, it is good to establish your credit.

Poor cashflow is the death of many businesses...you need a steady FLOW of CASH because there are some things you can't finance...so even if you got 2k in the bank for a mower, you might want to finance it or you may end up in trouble when something unforeseen comes up.

Owing money is not bad unless you've taken on more than you should have...but if you use credit smartly it can help your biz run more smoothly.