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lawnspecialties
05-02-2006, 05:26 PM
Well, one of my good commercial accounts just completed a big expansion of the building and property. Now, out behind the new parking lot is a pretty darn steep slope about 10-12 feet high and a good 100' long. I've only run ztr's and 21" mowers in my seven years as an LCO. What's the recommendation? I really don't want to cut this weekly with a trimmer.:dizzy:

I'm guessing a walk-behind is the key machine for a job like this. If I tried to put the SuperZ out there, I'd be on my head in a second. If a walk-behind is the ticket, would deck size affect it that much? If I stay with a 36" or less, I could use it on the few gated back yards I have.

What about the Metro 26? Have they finally worked out all them complaints I heard so often last season? Thanks ya'll.:)

cajuncutter
05-02-2006, 05:34 PM
I do not know why but when I ran nothing but walk behinds I discovered that my 48 actually did a better job than my 36 on steep slopes. It was easier to control; perhaps it was the weight difference. The rear of my 36 kept sliding down hill going length wise of the slope. If I were you I would go out and demo. If you do not have a specific call for a 36 and can justify a 48+ I would go with the larger. Most would say a 36 is more versatile because of the gate issues.

lawnspecialties
05-02-2006, 05:39 PM
I do not know why but when I ran nothing but walk behinds I discovered that my 48 actually did a better job than my 36 on steep slopes. It was easier to control; perhaps it was the weight difference. The rear of my 36 kept sliding down hill going length wise of the slope. If I were you I would go out and demo. If you do not have a specific call for a 36 and can justify a 48+ I would go with the larger. Most would say a 36 is more versatile because of the gate issues.

That's what I was thinking. I guess the wider deck size gives it more stability. Thanks

mike lane lawn care
05-02-2006, 05:44 PM
i am missing something, a hill that is 12 feet high and 100 feet long has an angle of 12 degrees. i would mow this in a second with my rider, just go up and down. but is the angle constant all the way down? can you post some pictures?

lawnspecialties
05-02-2006, 06:34 PM
100' long, not 100' high. It's probably a 60 degree slope if I had to guess. When I say 100' long, I mean for example from east to west.

out till dark
05-02-2006, 07:15 PM
I have an 04 scag swzu and an05 exmark tthp.

Hands down the exmark sticks like glue to any slope i ever had it on.

The wheelbase is wider and better center of gravity when mowing sideways across slopes.

davemanou812
05-02-2006, 08:10 PM
I would advise against the emark 36" I have never had the justification for the 48, only the 36 for gates and it doesnt do well mowing lengthwise on the slope, if it is smooth you could run the rider down the slope if you had a way to get back up, does that make sense?

Lawn-Scapes
05-02-2006, 08:30 PM
I have one yard that has a pretty nice slope out front. I used to have a heck of a time cutting it with a 50" Gravely. I found an old Scag 36" belt drive for sale cheap.. so I bought it. It works great on the slope.

If it's a 60 degree slope.. good luck putting any mower on it.

lawnspecialties
05-02-2006, 08:33 PM
If it's a 60 degree slope.. good luck putting any mower on it.

That's what I'm afraid of.:dizzy:

Signature Landscaping1
05-02-2006, 08:41 PM
Try a hover mower

oldturf
05-02-2006, 08:54 PM
If it is really a steep slope then you have to be concerned about oil pick up in the engine. A two stroke is no problem but most four strokes will have some degree angle where they loose pick up of oil. I would check this out as well as slope holding ability. Good Luck!

lawnspecialties
05-02-2006, 08:57 PM
If it is really a steep slope then you have to be concerned about oil pick up in the engine. A two stroke is no problem but most four strokes will have some degree angle where they loose pick up of oil. I would check this out as well as slope holding ability. Good Luck!

Good point. It is that steep of a slope.

nmez21
05-02-2006, 09:10 PM
Idk----60 deg. I think you'd have better luck inventing a mower w/ tracks unless you use the looping method---mow down the hill, then drive around back to the top(not mowing) then mow down again, big time waster though.

blakeg314
05-02-2006, 09:13 PM
my scag 48 does fine on hills i just have to keep my hand on the controls to make it from slipping ohter than that nice and straight.. never go up and down on a hill

NCSERVICE
05-02-2006, 09:30 PM
I have been doing a hoa with a 60 degree hill all fescue for about 3 years it takes my guy a tank and a half of gas through the trimmer, to steep for rider, wb, and push... anybody have any experience with the Husqvarna hovering trimmers? I would definitely drop the $$ if it really works.

work_it
05-02-2006, 09:40 PM
Once you figure out which mower to use on the slope spray the area with growth inhibitor. That way you only have to risk life and limbs once every 3 to 4 weeks.

Oldtimer
05-02-2006, 09:46 PM
I believe the industry standard for engines is a max angle of 20 degrees.

Oldtimer

grassbandit
05-02-2006, 09:48 PM
Hustler 48" Hydro. I use mine on steep hills all the time. Probably as much as 50-60 degrees. Great mower.

Bay de Noc Lawn Car
05-02-2006, 10:04 PM
I have the smaller Husqvarna hovering mower. I think it is a 16'' cut. A string trimmer is much faster than this mower because of the down-draft. I can't speek for the bigger mower.

ALarsh
05-02-2006, 10:10 PM
Be a man and take the Z on it. You never know what kind of a slope your Z will take until you try it. :drinkup: btw, don't come back to me if you flip it.:usflag:

specialtylc
05-02-2006, 10:15 PM
Its not that large an area. Just use your 21.:hammerhead: Its only going to take you 10 minutes to mow it. No point in buying a different mower.

dcondon
05-02-2006, 10:26 PM
Its not that large an area. Just use your 21.:hammerhead: Its only going to take you 10 minutes to mow it. No point in buying a different mower.

I was thinking the same thing:confused:

NCSERVICE
05-02-2006, 11:07 PM
look you dont think in 3 years and probably 10 different employees that we havent tried everything? its to steep to decelerate a z and the bottom butts up against pine trees so there is no where to run it out, walk behind same problem, even if it could be done with a hydro wb strait up and down theres no where to turn around at the bottom,push mower would kill you and its to steep to go sideways. so we trim it, i cut weed eat and blow the whole place, and a house while he trims, haha

topsites
05-02-2006, 11:22 PM
Wide decks are more likely to slide or slip out from under you, while narrow decks are somewhat more likely to flip and roll.
However, my 48" fixed deck has flipped end over end before, so there's no guarantee.

The only thing about the Wb is, so long you are careful to never place yourself underneath the machine (meaning the mower is above you on the hill), when things go wrong you can let go but it's still dangerous.

Maybe charge a 5-10 dollar hazardous area fee, that should cover your time dealing with it?

Oldtimer
05-03-2006, 06:45 AM
The best way to mow slopes is with a hover mower, 2 ropes and 2 workers.

Oldtimer

Jay Ray
05-03-2006, 06:55 AM
The best way to mow slopes is with a hover mower, 2 ropes and 2 workers.

Oldtimer

I bet that works good. I have the Husqvarna 21 hover and it is heavy compared to a trimmer. It will work one man pretty hard on larger areas.

Splicer
05-03-2006, 07:11 AM
Best bet is a staggered wheel 2 stroke self propelled Lawn-Boy. I wouldn't use anything else on a slope. Look on eBay...:usflag:

SWD
05-03-2006, 07:23 AM
Any of the hover mowers will work on that slope you are describing.
Choose a brand supported by a dealer in your area, I use Allen mowers imported by Seagro out of FL.
Simply tie a rope to the handle of the mower, and only one man walks back and forth across the top of the hill - paying out line until the mower is at the bottom and the slope has been cut.
I do, however, suggest choosing a machine of at least 18" or larger.

Oldtimer
05-03-2006, 07:30 AM
Hustler 48" Hydro. I use mine on steep hills all the time. Probably as much as 50-60 degrees. Great mower.


Another geometry class dropout.

An example most people can relate to is the banking at Talladega which is 33 degrees and requires a minimum speed of 90 mph to keep from sliding down the turns. It is not possible to walk up the turns.

Oldtimer

The Captain
05-03-2006, 10:21 AM
I've been wondering, are we talking 60 degrees or 30 degrees from horizontal? I'm looking at my 30/60 drafting triangle. There is no way you can walk or even stand on a 60 degree slope without ropes from the top. 60 degrees is almost vertical (90 degrees). I do the back side, the area of a football field, of a lake dam (30 to 45 degrees) with a 48" wb and would not even think of doing anything steeper. For example, roadway side slopes, beyond the shoulder, are 45 degrees (2:1) slopes maximum.

The Captain

mike lane lawn care
05-03-2006, 08:40 PM
Another geometry class dropout.

An example most people can relate to is the banking at Talladega which is 33 degrees and requires a minimum speed of 90 mph to keep from sliding down the turns. It is not possible to walk up the turns.

Oldtimer

might i say that that is a racetrack, the cars do not have gripping turf tires, it is a whole different world. i bought a device that i can put on the hill and it tells me the angle, i have a 50 degree hill that i do with a rider, i go from top down, drive around to the top and go down again. it is only like 40 feet wide so it only takes a few passes.
and if you couldn't walk up the turn, how the heck did they make it and pave it?

milsaps118
05-03-2006, 10:05 PM
I had an account with a berm that was 15' high and about 300' long probably a 15 degree angle, I'd start on the bottom with my 52" ZTR and make it up to about half way before I got to nervous of rolling over then I'd grab the 48" lesco wb and do the rest. It sucked even though I only had to ruff cut it once a month. When it was wet I'd wear softball cleets so I wouldn't slip. Your hill doesn't sound as server as the one I was doing, try it the way I did mine. Your forearms will look like Popeye's when the summers over!!!:weightlifter:

Oldtimer
05-03-2006, 10:10 PM
Talladega is the longest track on the NASCAR circuit and the five-story, 33-degree banking in the corners defies anyone to walk up the track, much less work on it. A special piece of machinery has been invented to pave the banked turns.

NCSERVICE
05-04-2006, 07:12 PM
Talladega is the longest track on the NASCAR circuit and the five-story, 33-degree banking in the corners defies anyone to walk up the track, much less work on it. A special piece of machinery has been invented to pave the banked turns.

Gimme some grass a trimmer and some redwings and ill trim that corner.