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jabbo
05-04-2006, 06:39 PM
Would it be ok to run 1" cl 200 for my mainline? 13 gpm at 50 psi.

Dirty Water
05-04-2006, 07:33 PM
Yes.

How long is this mainline?

jabbo
05-04-2006, 07:49 PM
The line for the front yard is about 232'(I know thats a pretty good ways) and the other one that will T off of it to do the backyard will be about 150'.

Dirty Water
05-04-2006, 08:14 PM
I'm not looking at any charts, but according to my memory your going to lose a hair over 5 psi by 230' at 13 gpm...

You'll be fine.

jabbo
05-04-2006, 08:22 PM
Well as luck would have it my well is the highest point in my yard(beleive it not). So I have roughly 14' of elevation change by the time I get to that 232' mark. So with 14 x .433 = 6 to my good it should really be ok.

jabbo
05-04-2006, 10:13 PM
A few more questions while I'm asking.

1. I'm going to use Hunter PGV valves. Which is better angle or globe? Also, slip or threaded? And do I get flow control or not?
2. Do you guys recommend swing joints or funnypipe? I'm considering the cost also.
3. Single cond. wire, multi cond. or what? Also each valve goes homerun to the controller or is there some other way I'm not familiar with?

bdb
05-04-2006, 10:41 PM
A few more questions while I'm asking.

1. I'm going to use Hunter PGV valves. Which is better angle or globe? Also, slip or threaded? And do I get flow control or not?
2. Do you guys recommend swing joints or funnypipe? I'm considering the cost also.
3. Single cond. wire, multi cond. or what? Also each valve goes homerun to the controller or is there some other way I'm not familiar with?

Angle valve feeds from the bottom globe goes in the side. That depends on the main depth and the lateral depths on which you choose. Slip or thread preferance too. It's easier to un-screw something if its bad or broke then un-glue it.

Funny pipe is a "custom made" swing joint...just make sure you don't have long runs of it. I have run up to 5' on a rotor at 3gpm and they still worked great. Prob not the best tho.

Run one multi cond with the mainline and to the cont....ex 6 zones use 7 wire one common and the controll wires. I usually put in some extra JUST incase. You never know if your going to add or have a bad wire.

PurpHaze
05-05-2006, 08:17 AM
A few more questions while I'm asking.

3. Single cond. wire, multi cond. or what? Also each valve goes homerun to the controller or is there some other way I'm not familiar with?

There's also two wire decoded and RF... but since cost is a factor put in multi strand. And like BDB suggested put in more wire than you need right now. You will thank yourself in the future. :)

jabbo
05-07-2006, 04:47 PM
I want to make sure that running cl 200 1" for my whole system(13 gpm @ around 50 psi) is going to be ok. Any input on this matter is greatly appreciated. I don't want to buy all this pipe and decide its not what I want to install. Also on the laterals for the sprays (flower beds), would yall drop down to 3/4" or would you stay at 1", And would it be ok to just hard pipe them in instead of using funny pipe or swing joints?

Wet_Boots
05-07-2006, 04:57 PM
If you have the slightest doubts, bump up the pipe size to inch-and-a-quarter, and you can concern yourself with other matters.

Dirty Water
05-07-2006, 05:02 PM
If you have the slightest doubts, bump up the pipe size to inch-and-a-quarter, and you can concern yourself with other matters.

Not for the entire system....

Jabbo, to answer your question, I lay out my systems slightly oldschool in the fact that I still size out my zones. I start with the mainline size, and drop down in sizes from each head. I don't like working with 1/2", so I only go down to 3/4"

So, on your system with a 1" main (Which is perfectly acceptable btw), I would run 1" to the first handfull of heads, and then drop down to 3/4" for the last two. Saves a bit of money on pipe, and because you don't need to move as many GPM by that point, you don't lose PSI due to friction loss.

As far as laterials. Definitly use a swing joint or funny pipe. I take it you trenching this in, I usually run a 3/4" spur off the 1" zone line within 2' or so of the head, and then run funny pipe the remaining way.

Wet_Boots
05-07-2006, 05:20 PM
I was only referring to the mainline, when I spoke of bumping up the pipe size, given the title of this thread. There is some minor amount of friction loss that the increase would avoid. Since this system was in the design phase early last summer, a time arrives to stop kicking around the details and to start breaking ground.

jabbo
05-07-2006, 07:30 PM
Wet Boots reminds me of this guy that I run across on another forum that involves a totally different hobby. He knows his s__t but just can't seen to get the public relations thing down. But your right Wet Boots, it is time for me to start this job. I only am trying to do exactly what you people preach on this site, read,read,and ask questions! So with that I have another question. I have 2 spray zones. 1 in front yard and 1 in back. They total 16.1 gpm. I only have around 13 gpm. I would like to combine the 2 into 1. Would this be possible? Or if they have to stay seperate how will this work with 1 at 6.5 gpm and the other at 9.6?

JeffY
05-07-2006, 08:08 PM
You won't be able to combine both spray zones together as it exceeds your available GPM. Just keep the zones seperate, one valve for the front and the 2nd valve runs the back spray zone. It's okay to have one zone running at 6 GPM and the other at 9. You've then given yourself room in the future to add heads if the landscape were to change.

Dirty Water
05-07-2006, 08:10 PM
It's okay to have one zone running at 6 GPM and the other at 9. You've then given yourself room in the future to add heads if the landscape were to change.

Only if his source is from a water system and there is no pump involved.

If you don't use all of your available GPM on a well pump system, you risk cycling the pump.

Wet_Boots
05-07-2006, 08:29 PM
I'm willing to offend anybody that doesn't seem willing to do their work. That may or may not include present company. The need to match system to pump performance has already been discussed. The fact that only the person with the system plan in front of him can run the numbers to determine pressure losses in the system has already been discussed. Any homeowner unwilling to do the math necessary to design a sprinkler system should consider handing off the entire job to someone competent enough to do it.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=111715&page=4

If the spray nozzles get replaced with MP rotators, the flow of the two zones combined should be a better match to pump performance. I'm willing to wager that an experienced designer could come up with a plan that matched sprayhead zones to the pump performance.

jabbo
05-07-2006, 09:06 PM
I take that back about Wet Boots reminding of the guy on the other forum. He's twice as bad. And by the way I don't do this everyday and yes an experienced designer could come up with a solution. But I am not one, that is the reason I asked you. I thought there may be some sort of trick of the trade (like the mp rotaters) that I could use. I am a licensed electrician. You can bet your sweet a__ that I know what work is all about if you a referring to me being some nerd that sits in front of a computer all day long!!! And by the way I'm from the south and after seeing were your from I dont hold any grudges againsts you for being pissed off at the world most of the time. For everybody else, I really appreciate the help, I'll try not to ask anymore STUPID questions!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Wet_Boots
05-08-2006, 12:57 AM
If you are an experienced designer, then kindly extract your thumb and start running the numbers. Your history of posts suggest a disinterest in doing this basic task. Hydraulics are different than electricity, but close enough. You don't need any 'tricks of the trade' like MP Rotators. Save those for in case they're absolutely necessary.

Wet_Boots
05-08-2006, 06:24 AM
You might revisit your design and look again at your spray zones. Two things you can do are
1) Use larger nozzles, like the 17/18 foot adjustables
2) Add a sprayhead or two or three or four, and use the extras in place of a rotor head. You can always remove one rotor from a zone, and increase the nozzle sizes of the remaining heads, and keep the system in step with the pump.