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topsites
05-07-2006, 01:08 AM
Although every year it takes me months to accustom myself again to drive the rig like it's a train, I see fuel mileage increase from around 12mpg all the way to 14 and 15mpg on my D-250 carbureted 1986 fuel-driven truck.

Some things I have done that helped:
Installed 8mm Taylor High performance spark plug wires
Installed High Performance cap and rotor.
Installed Flame-Thrower High Performance ignition coil.
Installed High-performance air filter.
Installed double-platinum spark plugs.
Removed tailgate and replaced with a net.

Doing the above increased my mpg by around 2 miles per gallon (around 20 percent). It also increased power considerably, which makes the next part tough:

The next part is in the driving. Year after year I practice day in and day out to drive nice and easy on the throttle and accelerate about as slow or slower as a fully loaded 18-wheeler. I fear say the biggest drawback is driving the rig like it's a car, and also thinking that since it has a trailer it needs to PULL so we automatically give it more gas or the same gas longer.
The trailer will come along without PULLING. It is hard to measure since the motor is doing the work, but if you've ever ridden a bicycle with your child in a seat, you can figure this one out by pedaling normal, you hardly feel the weight but start to push the pedals and oh now you can feel it - same principle applies: Try not to make the truck feel the trailer, but let it come along on its own by being very light on the throttle. Truth be known, less gas is the secret, not more.

The rig consumes the most fuel from 0mph accelerating, and I have learned this is the time to give it the LEAST amount of fuel. Accelerate very slowly and then give it just a little more once you get up to 15 or 20 mph and then wait while holding the pedal lightly pressed, let the truck work its magic mile by mile per hour, I know I am doing the right thing when the needle is barely moving upward. Let it take a few minutes if that's what it takes, the slower the needle moves, the better the mpg.

Use terrain to your advantage: Allow the truck to slow some going uphill (never accelerate uphill, and if you have to then stay below the speed limit), and let OFF the gas some just before you crest the hill. Of course, use downhills to build up speed but again, real nice and easy.

Predict traffic lights and don't make the mistake most folks make of hurrying up to the light to stop and wait. Instead, slow down early and coast most of the way: You're even better off to slow down to 15-20mph a ways up the road and then sneaking up on the intersection so long you don't have to stop, that is the idea.

If you're not sure whether the light will be green or will turn red, you are better off slowing down in case it turns red than speeding up to try and beat it. Trust me.

The true secret to driving is to learn to control your speed using only the gas pedal. For example, I almost never use the brakes on off-ramps, instead I let off the gas early enough to slow the vehicle down with coasting.

At the ON-ramp, use the full length of the ramp to build speed slowly, use some shoulder if you have to but try not to (it's illegal for one, dangerous for another due to roadside debris) but you get the idea: use that ramp to build speed, and be ready to merge below speed limit (I usually merge doing 35-40mph into a 55-65 zone). If you move slow and your turn signal is on, people will see you - The more you drive this way, the more they know your style.

In traffic, hang back: Everybody is always trying to be number one. The easiest position to achieve in this race is last, and once you're last, fall back some more so you have SPACE in front of you: Use this space when traffic in front slows down so you can coast instead of using brakes.

From what I have seen, the time saved by rushing is not worth the money spent on fuel, brakes, tires, and everything else that wears and tears at over twice the rate as when taking it real easy, not even when time is worth 60 dollars / hour, not even then.

E&MLandscapeServices
05-07-2006, 01:50 AM
Your post reminded me of a trip I went on with my brother-in-law many years ago. His boss asked him to deliver a 3-ton air conditioning unit to Miami (12 hour drive). He asked me to go along to drive the trip back. He picked me up in a 12-passenger van - with the unit on a trailer behind it. We were barely maxing out at 40-45 MPH - unless we drafted off a tractor trailer but they didnt like that. We were burning some serious fuel too. We stopped in a truck stop and asked if any of them were going in our direction and one driver said he was and said we could get as close as we wanted behind his truck. We thought we had a great idea - until he came out of the truck stop and got in his rig.... he had a trailer full of hogs. We drove for about 8 hours behind him - windows all the way up, AC off - to keep the hog smell from knocking us out. I bet he was laughing his butt off the entire time but at least we didn't have to stop every 30 minutes for gas.....

Tn Lawn Man
05-07-2006, 09:38 AM
Good advice in these days of SOARING fuel costs.

topsites
05-07-2006, 10:41 AM
Your post reminded me of a trip I went on with my brother-in-law many years ago. His boss asked him to deliver a 3-ton air conditioning unit to Miami (12 hour drive).

Weight is another huge consideration, the quest for ridiculous good fuel mileage comes at the cost of an attitude and a mindset:
- First, unload everything, and I mean everything until the truck and trailer are empty.
- Then, plan to do one thing the whole next day, and always try and plan your days so you do one thing the whole day. Example: Mon is grass-cutting all day, tues is mulch all day, wed is all hedge-trimming and fert, and so on.
- Last but not least, load only that which you need for tomorrow. Then at the end of the day you can either stay that way if the next day is the same thing again, or unload that stuff and re-load accordingly. For mulch, you need a barrow, a pitchfork and a rake, maybe the edger and a tarp. But no, you don't need the chainsaw.

Fuel cans stay at home: Wb's last all day on a tank, I see no sense in Lco's carrying not one but two 5-gallon fuel cans with them, that's close to 100 pounds extra just in fuel. Fill everything up the night before and learn to go easy on the throttle of the 2-cyclers as well.
For grass-cutting, I load one Wb, one weed-eater, and the blower. That's it, thou I did take an empty oil bottle and fill it with mix-gas, this is far lighter than 2.5 gallons of mix fuel. And, I have a fuel-syphon because a backpack blower can re-fuel the weed-eater, the truck can re-fuel the Wb and do carry some cash in case you forget to fuel the Wb one night.
NEVER leave equipment idling while talking to someone or ooops gotta run to the truck get something just for a minute: Always turn stuff off at all times when not in use, even if it's just for a second.
To train myself to do it, at one time I turned up the idle on all my 2-cyclers (chainsaw, weed-eater, hedge trimmer) just high enough to where the moving part would never stop moving: This forced me to turn stuff off because it would walk away if you didn't - This also relieves a potential safety issue, you should never leave power equipment running.

So yes, those Lco's carrying all that extra stuff thinking how professional they look, that's not pro, that's amateurish because all they're doing is wasting fuel and a lot more stuff gets in the way at the job site when they need one piece of equipment half the time they unload half the trailer to get to it.
Not having a ton of stuff on the rig makes it look clean, and it gets better mpg. I do carry a rake and a tarp at all times, and a toolbox and yes, belts and some other spare parts that I know I need in an emergency (jumper cables and a tow rope, stuff like that).
If something comes up while you're out there that you could do if you had the tool but now you can't, just schedule it for another day: This also helps you prevent yourself from low-balling some quick off-site job 'since you're already there' some Lco's tend to feel like giving a quick discount.

grass disaster
05-07-2006, 10:57 AM
please keep your posts shorter. it's too boring to read all of that.

HDALLC
05-07-2006, 10:59 AM
F.Y.I Removing the tailgate in a pick up actually decreases the fuel mileage. the way the trucks are designed now, you need to leave the tailgate on to get optimum fuel mileage because of the vortex created behind the cab helps crate a "bubble of air" that helps the air flow over the bed with the tail gate removed the "bubble" isn't formed allowing the air flow to push down on your bed and increases push on the bed therefore decreasing the gas mileage

MarcSmith
05-07-2006, 11:32 AM
alot of good information. but I imagine some of the "high perfamce stuff actually hurt you if done by itself. The net is useless. Lockheed(youknow of sr71 fame) did extensive lowspeed tunnel tests to prove this. and acutally the mythbusters(discovery channel) proved it as well.

I do agree that removing stuff off of the tailer to save weight and thus save fuel, would work. but it would then recquire a second trip to that particular house for the more detailed service. Thus wasting more fuel and travel time.

I ran my rigs full of mowers and full of fuel and equipment and I had a 20 gallon toung mounted fuel tank.

With mowers and my detail equipment on board i was able to make one stop at the house each week and take care of weeding, pruning, mowing, minor irrigation repairs. With the 20 gallons of fuel on board and a full tank of gas on the truck and in the equipment. I could run all week and not have to stop at a gas station, except on friday or monday to gas up for the entire week. This saved the countless trips to 7-11 and the extra loss of time filling up equipment or gas cans 2-3 times, plus the lost time of employees getting big gulps, and reduced the risk of accidents but not havingto take a truck and trailer into a possibly tight station.

JJLandscapes
05-07-2006, 12:50 PM
Although every year it takes me months to accustom myself again to drive the rig like it's a train, I see fuel mileage increase from around 12mpg all the way to 14 and 15mpg on my D-250 carbureted 1986 fuel-driven truck.

Some things I have done that helped:
Installed 8mm Taylor High performance spark plug wires
Installed High Performance cap and rotor.
Installed Flame-Thrower High Performance ignition coil.
Installed High-performance air filter.
Installed double-platinum spark plugs.
Removed tailgate and replaced with a net.

Doing the above increased my mpg by around 2 miles per gallon (around 20 percent). It also increased power considerably, which makes the next part tough:




so lets say you can actually somehow manage to drive that perfectly with the throttle and get your estimate 2 mpg more ..... how much will you save a year ... it might take you a few years to pay off those parts you replaced unless your houses are all 20 miles away from eachother



something wierd my SUV gets the same mileage with our without a trailer on it i dont have a gas gauge so i clock the odometer

DLS1
05-07-2006, 03:41 PM
Customer gave about 12 pills that smell like mothballs to put in gas tank to increase mpg. It is called BioPerformance. Doing a test now in my two truck gas tanks. One tank is without the pills and the other is with 2 pills. Will see if really gets better gas mileage. Things you do to please the customer. :laugh:

He sells them for $1 pill.

The customer claims he is getting 3 mpg better now than before the pills. :laugh:

Dirty Water
05-07-2006, 03:58 PM
Customer gave about 12 pills that smell like mothballs to put in gas tank to increase mpg. It is called BioPerformance. Doing a test now in my two truck gas tanks. One tank is without the pills and the other is with 2 pills. Will see if really gets better gas mileage. Things you do to please the customer. :laugh:

He sells them for $1 pill.

The customer claims he is getting 3 mpg better now than before the pills. :laugh:


Thats a old one.

The best MPG controller is your right foot.

DLS1
05-07-2006, 04:08 PM
Thats a old one.

The best MPG controller is your right foot.


Yes I know the mothballs idea has been around forever. I figure it didn't cost me a thing and I can tell the customer I tried it and it didn't work for my truck. The things people fall for. :laugh: :laugh:

topsites
05-28-2006, 01:15 AM
I do agree that removing stuff off of the tailer to save weight and thus save fuel, would work. but it would then recquire a second trip to that particular house for the more detailed service. Thus wasting more fuel and travel time.

To each their own, but on multi-part jobs I've even gone out grass-cutting all day then come back and did the hedge trimming on hedge trimming day. The reason I do not believe it wastes more fuel this way is because there are only so many hours in a day and I can only service so many yards. Regardless of how many times I have to come back to the same yard to finish a job, it is all done on different days, and if I service 5 yards ... Well maybe you're right, by finishing the job instead of running to the next...

I dunno...

On the tailgate issue, maybe the newer trucks are different but on mine it did make a difference. You can't lose by trying, don't buy the net for a week or so as you learn to drive more carefully :)

mike lane lawn care
05-28-2006, 01:39 AM
my JEEP gets 19 MPG according to the onboard computer when towing the trailer and 21 MPG when on the highway.

hosejockey2002
05-28-2006, 02:59 AM
My philosophy is sort of the opposite. If there is a tool that has the slightest chance of being needed, it goes in the trailer. I don't spend any time loading or unloading everyday. Everything stays in the enclosed trailer and I know it's there when I need it. Ok, so it costs me an extra gallon of gas a day at the most. Three bucks. Not having a tool I need or having to make a second trip to a property costs a heck of a lot more than three dollars. Time is money, and an hour's value will buy a lot of gas.

olderthandirt
05-28-2006, 03:18 AM
Tips on how to get good mileage with trailer [15+ mpg]


BEST TIP
Pass the cost along to the customer and get on with your life.

Driving like a train :dizzy:

fiveoboy01
05-28-2006, 06:07 PM
I don't agree that moving from a stop is where you get your poorest mileage.

Mabye that initial movement to get yourself underway to a few mph, but I'm convinced that going from 5-10mph uses less gas than going from 40-45mph, provided the same rate of acceleration.

At higher speeds you've got wind resistance, more load on the engine(you're in a numerically lower gear), more rolling resistance from the tires, and larger parasitic loads from the trans/rearend/accessory drive.

topsites
05-28-2006, 06:24 PM
I don't agree that moving from a stop is where you get your poorest mileage.

Mabye that initial movement to get yourself underway to a few mph, but I'm convinced that going from 5-10mph uses less gas than going from 40-45mph, provided the same rate of acceleration.

At higher speeds you've got wind resistance, more load on the engine(you're in a numerically lower gear), more rolling resistance from the tires, and larger parasitic loads from the trans/rearend/accessory drive.

Depends how hard you accelerate, I suppose.
That it takes more fuel from 40-45 I don't doubt, but then you're covering 4-8 times the distance so you might get better fuel mileage, thou you'd consume more fuel, if you were to allow it to take as long or longer and depending on your transmission, you might consume as much fuel in a percent factor at either speed, but drop for drop, yes, higher speeds consume more fuel.

Usually, the only way my truck gets from 40-45 is by accident, meaning a light downhill grade is helping. Once the truck reaches 45, I might give it a tick more throttle just to keep it there.

Let me put it another way: If I step on the gas even ONE time during the whole week (which is how long a tank lasts me), my fuel mileage drops by around 1/2 mile / gallon, and I don't see 15mpg that week. By stepping on it, don't have to be to the floor, halfway down is bad enough, just one time is all it takes, one nice little feel of the power.

VWBOBD
05-28-2006, 11:21 PM
Customer gave about 12 pills that smell like mothballs to put in gas tank to increase mpg. It is called BioPerformance. Doing a test now in my two truck gas tanks. One tank is without the pills and the other is with 2 pills. Will see if really gets better gas mileage. Things you do to please the customer. :laugh:

He sells them for $1 pill.

The customer claims he is getting 3 mpg better now than before the pills. :laugh:

that is an old drag racers trick to boost octane, not going to get you 3mpg .
maybe a little more punch but not 3mpg.
and you can buy mothballs at walmart for like a buck a box of about 100. put a handfull in at fill up for the octane boost effect

topsites
05-29-2006, 12:09 AM
My philosophy is sort of the opposite. If there is a tool that has the slightest chance of being needed, it goes in the trailer. I don't spend any time loading or unloading everyday. Everything stays in the enclosed trailer and I know it's there when I need it. Ok, so it costs me an extra gallon of gas a day at the most. Three bucks. Not having a tool I need or having to make a second trip to a property costs a heck of a lot more than three dollars. Time is money, and an hour's value will buy a lot of gas.

We agree to disagree and you've changed my outlook as I now believe each method has its merits. Where you save time and labor and extra trips, I save fuel by loading / unloading and putting my body to what I feel is good use. Where you have the time to service one more yard by not loading / unloading, I make up this money in saved cost, I do believe it evens out so long you have the method straight, I further believe either way can work extremely well.

Now as for the extra jobs with the tool I don't have issue, what I do when that comes up is write it down on my schedule for the next day I have planned to go out there. My schedule runs 2 weeks at a time, and I can either already see the next scheduled date or I make a mark to put it on for the next 2 week stint, so the extra job gets done the next time I come out.
Yes, I will load the hedge trimmers on grass-cutting day if I know in advance that yard number 4 has this on schedule from 8-10 days ago, so to speak. And if I have enough hedge trimming jobs, I make a day of it and leave the trailer behind.

So, I always re-schedule these 'on-the-spot' jobs because I also found I am less likely to lowball myself, it is maybe just me but I find I lowball more often when I can do it right then and there but when I re-schedule I tend to charge the right price, but again that is possible is just me. I do carry a cordura / dernier personal 6x8 tarp and a light leaf rake, this helps tons and I also know how to trim bushes with the weedeater but I don't like doing it because of the whip effect some branches have.

The only other thing is, on my truck less stuff can get stolen but more importantly (to me) is less crap gets in the way because what really aggravates me is stuff getting hung up on each other but worse still is when a throttle handle or some other POS stupid piece breaks off because one tool caught the other. I suppose you have trimmer racks, meanwhile I don't so my outfit is again lighter. The ultra-light vs. the heavy weight, if the method is perfected, either one is a true winner.

BCSteel
05-29-2006, 03:15 AM
At the ON-ramp, use the full length of the ramp to build speed slowly, use some shoulder if you have to but try not to (it's illegal for one, dangerous for another due to roadside debris) but you get the idea: use that ramp to build speed, and be ready to merge below speed limit (I usually merge doing 35-40mph into a 55-65 zone). If you move slow and your turn signal is on, people will see you - The more you drive this way, the more they know your style.

Man, thats just bad advice. Merging that far under the limit causes a ripple effect down the line of traffic already traveling on the road causing everyone to slow down in both lanes as people try to avoid your slow entrance. Even if you drive that way your entire life, no one is going to remember let alone give a rip, they will only bad mouth you as a bad driver.

Up North
05-29-2006, 03:35 AM
BEST TIP
Pass the cost along to the customer and get on with your life.

Driving like a train :dizzy:

Exactly. Why go put out a bunch of $$ for more stuff to put on the truck, then waste my time installing or again shelling out $$ to have the stuff installed when I can bump up the rates a few bucks per customer and be done with it. Either way, the info is good and will probably help save a few gallons of gas. But between my busy schedule and most importantly...my play time, I don't have extra time to waste.:)

Buck

JJLandscapes
05-29-2006, 10:47 AM
did you know at 40 or 45 mph you save more gas by using your air conditioner than having all your windows open

on the side note if you really really need to do special precautions to save 2 mpg then you are doing something wrong in this biz if that is effecting your bottom line that much
If you want to save gas money drive like you are taking your road test

fiveoboy01
05-29-2006, 11:30 AM
Man, thats just bad advice. Merging that far under the limit causes a ripple effect down the line of traffic already traveling on the road causing everyone to slow down in both lanes as people try to avoid your slow entrance. Even if you drive that way your entire life, no one is going to remember let alone give a rip, they will only bad mouth you as a bad driver.

I couldn't agree more. The two things that infuriate me most when driving on highways:

People squatting in the left lane.

Mergers who pay zero attention to traffic they're merging into, and/or holding me up if I'm on the onramp as well.

topsites
05-29-2006, 11:59 AM
Exactly. Why go put out a bunch of $$ for more stuff to put on the truck, then waste my time installing or again shelling out $$ to have the stuff installed when I can bump up the rates a few bucks per customer and be done with it. Either way, the info is good and will probably help save a few gallons of gas. But between my busy schedule and most importantly...my play time, I don't have extra time to waste.:)

Buck

No doubt, it is all in what excites you, if this does not excite you then there are other ways you can increase profit and you should do that which you enjoy doing... As for me, I love this part so it excites me.

Because then I bump up the rates also, and put the difference in my pocket instead of the tank. Also I have the ability to offer lower rates, should I ever find a need for doing this but more importantly, it gives me the ability to never raise my rates on regular customers in-season, fuel prices can rocket to 5 a gallon and suddenly I'm already ahead of the game while everyone scrambles to figure out the effect of such a trend, I find it is best to come prepared for the worst, always.

For many years and even today it frustrates me to hear someone say 'it is the cost of doing business' because if I can eliminate that cost while I charge the same money as someone who deals with said cost, I earn more profit.
And why not, the best thing since low-balling is to charge the higher rate as if you had this cost.
Then, save the money... And when the poopie hits the fan, you are ready.

topsites
05-29-2006, 12:11 PM
I couldn't agree more. The two things that infuriate me most when driving on highways:

People squatting in the left lane.

Mergers who pay zero attention to traffic they're merging into, and/or holding me up if I'm on the onramp as well.

I won't hold you up, I get out there and most of the time folks move out of the way and I am ready to drive on the shoulder if I must but more often I pick lesser-traveled roads so the traffic isn't that heavy.

It's a 20-year old truck I drive, even if I push it there is a lifter that ticks and the crankshaft is loose which makes the harmonic balancer (and hence the belts) wobble and the transmission costs more to rebuild than the truck is worth and I was already warned a year ago I was told it was in dire need of a rebuild. It is carbureted and it will build power fast with the extra stuff under the hood, she'll do 100mph even now, but with all that crap the moment I let off the gas, unfortunately the fuel on a carb-run truck doesn't respond immediately so now I get a huge backfire out of the exhaust (Ka-BOOOOM !!!). Funny as that may sound, it will scare the daylights out of you, especially if it's enough fuel to ignite and a flame shoots out with the noise.

////////////////////////

Does 2 miles per gallon affect my bottom line that much?
No, but how about 2-4 when my mpg was 10-12 before, now it's 14-15...
We're talking close to 20 percent here and with my stuff, fuel is almost 10 percent of the budget today and 20 percent off of that takes it down to 7-8 percent, so yes it makes a big difference and for those of you who don't think a half a percent is a difference, 1/10th a percent from 30 thousand is 30 dollars free money, that's one lawn someone else cuts for free every year, per .1 percent.

In the first few years there was nothing I could do but keep my cost down, a percent here and there was nothing... But today in my 5th year things are so efficient that a 1/2 a percent is a big difference to me, and 1/2 mile a gallon on 20 gallons is 10 more miles I could have driven on the same fuel, per week, that's 200+ miles a year, or 2-3 days of driving without fuel expenses, per 1/2 percent. Do this twice, add it up to one percent, and I just got a whole week of free driving (no, not exactly but kinda).

Do this enough, and suddenly you have a thousand dollars extra in the bank.

topsites
05-29-2006, 12:31 PM
The thing I found about great mileage is it does not happen overnight. I did not go from 10-12 mpg to 14-15 in no matter of days, not even weeks or months, it took years to get there.

Years of studying the problem and making adjustments, each of these adjustments might have meant .1 percent or 1/2 percent here and there, it all eventually added up and so it is a matter of looking far into the future or way back when and seeing the big picture.

1-2 mpg is nothing to a vehicle that gets 25-30 mpg to begin with but our trucks are getting 10-12 mpg and 1-2 mpg is 10-20 percent now so the lower your mpg to begin with, the greater the benefit even in small numbers. 15 percent from a 65 dollar fill-up is 10 dollars... 4 weeks into it and I can fill a grocery cart with the 40 dollars I just saved, while most folks spend 70-100 dollars on a grocery cart, imagine if it were possible to combine the high income of those who can afford it with the low expense of someone like myself. It is not quite 100 percent possible because it takes time, time which those who can afford it invest in earning more money, time which I invest in saving said money in the first place, it does somewhat add out but there is not much argument that cutting cost is one fast way to greater profits (and invisible to the customer, what they can't see going in your pocket is some of the fastest money you ever made LOL).

Still, how many of you run 8mm wires, a high performance cap and rotor, and a high performance ignition coil? If I had to blindly bet 20 dollars for each rig out there on having it or not and I put my bet on the fact that it does NOT have it, I would come out ahead at least half the time but likely closer to 8 or 9 out of 10 are running all stock components.
Double platinum spark plugs? If half the trucks out there have it, I would be shocked.

JJLandscapes
05-29-2006, 02:30 PM
Am i the only one that gets the same mileage with or without a trailer? towing a 7x12 with not much equipment on it and no matter what for 3 years get the same distance on a full tank

mag360
05-29-2006, 03:06 PM
Those platinum plugs are no good in dodge motors (or any others).
They spark too hot and wear out super quick.

all ferris
05-29-2006, 03:22 PM
If I did all that slow driving crap I would never get my route done in a day.

Say your tank is 20 gallons and you get 13mpg on that tank of gas that cost you $2.80/gal. It cost you about 21.5 cents per mile. At 15 mpg it cost 18.5 cents per mile.

A difference of 3 cents...and if you drive 15000 miles a year you save $450.

450 bucks is a drop in the bucket over a year and it is easily passed on to the customer.

Say you have 60 customers that you service weekly for 30 weeks/year. If you raise their rate just 50 cent per visit you will make $900 more a year.

Now ask me if I'm gonna be driving in the slow lane??:laugh:

topsites
05-29-2006, 07:02 PM
If I did all that slow driving crap I would never get my route done in a day.

Say your tank is 20 gallons and you get 13mpg on that tank of gas that cost you $2.80/gal. It cost you about 21.5 cents per mile. At 15 mpg it cost 18.5 cents per mile.

A difference of 3 cents...and if you drive 15000 miles a year you save $450.

450 bucks is a drop in the bucket over a year and it is easily passed on to the customer.

Say you have 60 customers that you service weekly for 30 weeks/year. If you raise their rate just 50 cent per visit you will make $900 more a year.

Now ask me if I'm gonna be driving in the slow lane??:laugh:

Haste makes waste is my thing.
Hurry up, because all that happens is you have to stop again at the red light up the street while I mosey along, the average speed of a car on a traffic-lit turnpike is 20-25 mph, that's in a 45mph zone and it makes no difference whether you stomp it and hit 90 between lights or whether you take it easy and maintain the average, other than petrol...

It's not about saving a few lousy cents here and there, it's about developing an attitude so that you're not a wasteful slob like most americans. Most folks evidently feel like working double the hours in order to bring in 60k versus my 30k, they can go right ahead because the IRS takes a larger chunk and so does everything else. So by the time it's all said and done, their 60k after taxes is about 40k where I hardly pay squat on my 30k because my tax bracket is so far down, it's below the IRS minimum for a small business and it's below the poverty line and as far as I'm concerned, that's the place to be if you don't want to work like a slave every single day. Fact is, they're hardly interested in me.

Because one reason I got away from it all is I got tired of running like a hamster on a treadmill, I always got nowhere fast and the faster I ran, the faster I still got nowhere and the only thing that happens is everyone else gets more out of you than before.

They say it takes money to make money, but to spend foolishly is just not something I do when my take home pay is a thousand / month, something which most folks could never live off of.

Now if you want to spend, then please don't start the threads about the high cost of fuel. You do notice I don't complain much about that, meanwhile it appears the guys earning the most money also have the most issues with the fuel prices... Whatever happened to passing the cost along is obviously a problem when the customer is feeling the pinch, too.

ripple
05-29-2006, 09:49 PM
please keep your posts shorter. it's too boring to read all of that.

I agree...and I have only two suggestions...

First make sure tires are inflated properly and second get a Gm diesel.

stroker51
05-29-2006, 11:57 PM
My best tip on how to get 15+ MPG w/ a trailer, get a diesel. 96 PSD 4x4 Ext. Cab 5 speed, at least 15, usually 16 to 17 pullin 16' open, 737 Ztrak, 36 and 48 wb's, 21", 2 trimmers, backpack, handheld, and all my other tools in the box and 50 gal fuel tank in back. Even the old 91 7.3 would get 14.5 to 15 pullin mowin trailer, driving completely normal.

topsites
05-30-2006, 09:38 AM
It's not just your fuel.

Do you really think old people drive slow because we're so old we can't, out of all things, drive faster?
We may not be able to move as fast as we used to but with driving all it takes is stepping on the gas, rest assured old people can handle this task with fair ease, the real reason is we finally learned our lesson.

My brakepads last 100,000 miles or more, my tires (which cost 500 dollars for 4 cheap ones on my 3/4 ton) last at least 3-4 times longer, the transmission shaves less steel (when I stepped on it, every 10k miles there was a handful of shavings in the pan, of course most of you have never changed this fluid), and that's just for starters, so yes, thousands of dollars when you add insurance costs to it all, especially since we don't even carry most policy coverages nor pay for that extra warranty.

olderthandirt
05-30-2006, 10:17 AM
Do you really think old people drive slow because we're so old we can't, out of all things, drive faster?
We may not be able to move as fast as we used to but with driving all it takes is stepping on the gas, rest assured old people can handle this task with fair ease, the real reason is we finally learned our lesson.

NO! reaction time is slowed, eye sight is not as well as it once was. Speed is perceived to be increased with slow reaction times.

my tires (which cost 500 dollars for 4 cheap ones on my 3/4 ton) last at least 3-4 times longer,

As long as your not "burning" them off from a dead stop nothing you posted will increase tire life. Only one piece of info will and thats correct tire pressure.

so yes, thousands of dollars when you add insurance costs to it all, especially since we don't even carry most policy coverages

You only carry liability because the age of the truck :dizzy: Blue book totaled not worth the cost of collision.

What a total waste of space and BAD INFO on driving. Maybe you should have stuck with playing with trains BEFORE you got a lisc.

Hope you still have me on ignore I'd put you on but you seem to respond to every thread just to engage your fingers on the key board and show your ignorance.
Your comments in my sig line some it up well. not a whole lot going through that empty spot between your ears. :waving:
CHOO-CHOO