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stumped
05-16-2006, 05:27 PM
I have a client that has a bumble bee nest right smack dab in the middle of her flower bed. She wants them gone. While I did tell her they are actually beneficial, she still insists she wants them gone, she's allergic. She doesn't want a chemical solution either.
As much as I hate do do this, can I run a garden hose down the hole and drown them?
Any better way??????:confused:

newz7151
05-16-2006, 05:55 PM
double post

newz7151
05-16-2006, 05:56 PM
I have a client that has a bumble bee nest right smack dab in the middle of her flower bed. She wants them gone. While I did tell her they are actually beneficial, she still insists she wants them gone, she's allergic. She doesn't want a chemical solution either.
As much as I hate do do this, can I run a garden hose down the hole and drown them?
Any better way??????:confused:


hmm.. maybe a wet dry vac ? Make sure the filter is still installed. Suck em up and maybe relocate em. Or contract a professional bee keeper to come out and move them. Sometimes they will come out for free and remove them in order to add to their collection for organic honey production.

stumped
05-17-2006, 10:12 AM
Guess you learn something everyday:hammerhead:
I didn't know bumble bees pollinated to create honey:confused:

newz7151
05-17-2006, 12:02 PM
Guess you learn something everyday:hammerhead:
I didn't know bumble bees pollinated to create honey:confused:

I don't give a rats patoot what they do. I was referring more to the smaller bees which are usually removed from large nest areas. How many bumble bees are in your nest? Also, something about a large buzzing creature that I cannot stand either.

Also, maybe you can point the lady to this site : http://hercules.users.netlink.co.uk/Bee.html which states they are not a swarming bee and will not even attack if you do not smell like a flower.... and let's face it ladies.. even though you dump a whole bottle of perfume on yourself.. you smell like anything BUT a flower.

stumped
05-19-2006, 04:39 PM
The hole is about an inch in diameter. The bees are fairly good size too. She says she doesn't care how harmless they are she hates bees, so I still have the problem of what to do with them. Can I cram a hose down the hole and drown the little suckers?

newz7151
05-19-2006, 04:58 PM
The hole is about an inch in diameter. The bees are fairly good size too. She says she doesn't care how harmless they are she hates bees, so I still have the problem of what to do with them. Can I cram a hose down the hole and drown the little suckers?


Maybe if you just let it trickle in very slowly, they will all evacuate out and then you can try and just cover up the hole. The queen will probably stay in to try and protect the eggs, but I'm sure the drones and other ones will probably leave. Just be sure that you are way away when you are letting the water trickle in. Just put the hose at the mouth of the hole so they can still escape. Something else you might do is contact a bee keeper and get them to come out with one of those little smoke can things and smoke them out and then cover the hole.

I don't know anything else.. do what you're gonna do. If you gotta drown them and kill them, then do it, but there's no need to come back and post about killing the harmless, swarmless bumble bee.

stumpjumper
05-19-2006, 06:01 PM
i don't know what kind of bumblebees you have, but here in okla. they'll swarm your butt if you mess withem. they nest in the ground and if you drive a tractor or mower over their nest its on. my dad got stung 14 times in our hay meadow on a tractor. made him sick as a dog.

VWBOBD
05-20-2006, 02:14 AM
But A Bowl Over The Hole UPSIDE DOWN, PUT A ROCK OR SOMETHING TO HOLD IT INTO PLACE, Starve Them To Death In About A Week, I Do This All The Time. WORKS FOR WASPS TOO

Microbe
05-20-2006, 09:17 AM
Yea Yea... Starve em.. Yea Yea... "SMACK" Shut up Bevis lol..... I defenatly wouldn't starve them... Thats just bad karma... If your gona take them out do it quickly or relocate them. I've never gotten stung by a bee since I started landscaping and I have blondish hair....... Bee's are cool!
When you say Bumble Bee's are agressive, is this only when around there nest? I've litterally pet bumble bee's when there feeding. When there buzzin around going from flower to flower they seem harmless as a dog eating peanut butter. I didn't know that they make nests in the ground, are we talking about the same bumble bee? There is only one bumble bee right? I know carpenter bee's are the only ones that might look like them. Interesting......

TURF DOCTOR
05-20-2006, 10:06 AM
What's karma:confused:

stumped
05-20-2006, 11:14 AM
I don't know anything else.. do what you're gonna do. If you gotta drown them and kill them, then do it, but there's no need to come back and post about killing the harmless, swarmless bumble bee.

I'm sorry to have bothered you with my stupid questions. I stumbled onto this website in quest of a different problem. I thought that by joining I could learn about good lawn care from knowledgeable people. I have received some good information, but I have also found that a lot of you post just for the sake of boosting you post ratings.
It's obvious that you are mostly professional people, it's a shame that you don't want to pass your vast knowledge onto those of us who are new to the business. I know this is a competitive business, that's why I chose not to ask one our local professionals. I thought that joining a group like this would be a good way to learn. I'm sure there are friendlier sites out there, I'll go find one. Sorry to have intruded on your private club!

newz7151
05-20-2006, 11:26 AM
I'm sorry to have bothered you with my stupid questions. I stumbled onto this website in quest of a different problem. I thought that by joining I could learn about good lawn care from knowledgeable people. I have received some good information, but I have also found that a lot of you post just for the sake of boosting you post ratings.
It's obvious that you are mostly professional people, it's a shame that you don't want to pass your vast knowledge onto those of us who are new to the business. I know this is a competitive business, that's why I chose not to ask one our local professionals. I thought that joining a group like this would be a good way to learn. I'm sure there are friendlier sites out there, I'll go find one. Sorry to have intruded on your private club!

Well dude, I mean, nobody else was really offering anything. Maybe you could try reposting your initial start of this thread in a different forum. Might be that "Organic lawn care" was not the right heading and nobody else is seeing it. If they are really a problem, smoke em out and then plug up the hole. They will probably find a new home further away.

stumped
05-20-2006, 11:48 AM
You might try responding in a more civil way. I put it on the organic site because the customer wanted a "organic" solution!

upidstay
05-20-2006, 12:18 PM
Stumped, son't take it personally. Alot of landscapers are better with plants than with people. I have been saying for years that folks should either try and answer the question, or simply keep quiet. This site can be a bit of a private club, and some folks get pissy with newbies.
As far as your original question goes, I would first say leave them. Bublebees don't sting you unless you pick them up. If she absolutely has to get rid of these "killer" bumblebees, there are some organic bee sprays. Mint oil is one that I know of. You will probably need the whole can to kill the nest (really soak the heck out of it). You can probalby find it at Home Depot, or try a local feed store, or possibly an organic foods place might be able to steer you in the right direction.

stumped
05-20-2006, 06:39 PM
Thanks for the info. I'm a woodworker by profession and on our website we not only welcome newbies but encourage them as well. Our motto is "the only stupid question is the one you don't ask". I was recently hurt in a shop accident and decided it was time to find a different profession. It also got pretty hard to compete with the crap coming out of China and, Taiwan. I figured they can't import this kind of work:weightlifter:
I also look at it this way; we are all NEW at something at some point, so why not help out someone else if it makes their life easier. I like you motto, either say something constructive or say nothing. Making yourself feel big at someone else's expense usually doesn't win you much respect (in any profession) in the long run.

ArizPestWeed
05-20-2006, 10:03 PM
The mistake you are making is , you're expecting an answer too quickly .
In a few days , more people will of seen your post and you'll get more quality answers.
I would try pouring organic soap into the hold and then some water .
Suffocates them , I hope

stumped
05-21-2006, 10:19 AM
Thanks weedhead, I think I'll give that a try. I hate to be inhuman, but the little critters have to go or I'll lose one of my first clients. Here in the outskirts of Rochester, word of mouth is what builds a solid reputation. A couple of screw ups and you can kiss your business goodbye.
I really wasn't looking for instant replies. The problem is even in a couple of days I get no responses. Maybe I'm posting in the wrong places????
I recently posted a problem I'm having with exposed tree roots. I posted pictures and all and haven't received any feedback. I think I posted that last Monday or Tuesday. I'd have to do a search to see just what I did post it under. The first time I posted the question someone asked for pictures of the problem area. Oops sorry that was on a broadleaf weed problem.
As you can see as a "newbie" I have lots of questions.
I understand the need for control over the private messaging, but to have to wait to belong to the "club" for 30 days seems like a really long time.

K.Carothers
05-21-2006, 02:33 PM
Organic solution??? I don't know.

A natural solution... At night, pour gas down the hole and light.

( in a way, gas is organic)


kc

warren piece
05-23-2006, 11:51 AM
One thing I have done with ground hornets and it should work with bumble bees is spray fix a flat down the hole. It will harden and it will also get in to the various tunnels they might have made. Not really organic but effective.

Deere_Daze
05-23-2006, 07:56 PM
They are most likely yellowjackets. I had a problem with them last summer. I had one next under my central a/c unit, another in the overhang of my house and another under my woodpile. On the 2 nests in the ground I just sprayed "Great Stuff" in the hole and let them all starve to death and for the one in the overhang I wait untill fall and filled in where they were getting in with caulk. So far so good this year, no bees. *knock on wood*
Bad kharma or not, those bees were a danger to me becaus Im allergic to them, so I wanted them gone. I think the Gods can forgive me for that one.
I would try the water hose idea, but just be carefull. Do it early in the morning or late in the evening, when the bees are the least active and be ready to run like heck, because they are going to swarm when you turn on the water!

stumped
05-24-2006, 05:48 PM
I'm pretty sure they are bumble bees. I did a bee check and they match. The hole is about the size of a quarter in diameter. I should be able to shove the hose in there 4 or 5 inches. I learned about bees nesting at night too. I think I'm going to do it at night instead of morning, then I can go back in the morning and see if I can pull the hose out without getting the heck stung out of me. I think if I let the hose run a good 15 minutes it should saturate the ground sufficiently enough to drown them, even in a raised chamber.

VWBOBD
05-26-2006, 08:35 PM
I'm pretty sure they are bumble bees. I did a bee check and they match. The hole is about the size of a quarter in diameter. I should be able to shove the hose in there 4 or 5 inches. I learned about bees nesting at night too. I think I'm going to do it at night instead of morning, then I can go back in the morning and see if I can pull the hose out without getting the heck stung out of me. I think if I let the hose run a good 15 minutes it should saturate the ground sufficiently enough to drown them, even in a raised chamber.


drown them?!?, and you were worried about starving them? my way you wont get stung, your way , your gonna get pummeled.

stumped
05-27-2006, 09:26 PM
Drown them, starve them, dead is dead, and gone is gone. I just wanted this woman off my back. :gunsfirin That was worse than getting stung by a whole nest of hornets: :laugh:

freddyc
05-29-2006, 11:15 PM
You might try the gardenweb (website). There was a discussion a while ago about carpenter bees. Some lady had a natural concoction to get rid of them. I believe bumble bees are close in size and probably biologically. There's a powder thats a poison to them, and I think regular wasp killer gets them, but not for a nest.

When I was a kid, we would actually wait till night to get rid of ground nests. These were yellow jackets though.

At night, all the bees are in the nest. We would go out after dark with a small flashlight, can of gas, and a match. Believe me, about 1/4 gallon down the hole will get rid of them, but you have to be fast because some of them actually fly out....and they're not in a good mood either. I hate yellow jackets!

But it would really bother me to do it to bumble bees.

dcondon
05-29-2006, 11:40 PM
Drown them, starve them, dead is dead, and gone is gone. I just wanted this woman off my back. :gunsfirin That was worse than getting stung by a whole nest of hornets: :laugh:

Just go to the local Ace hardware and get a can of foaming hornet spray. Thats all you will need and I know. I went through several cans last year because I'm deadly allergic to them.:gunsfirin :gunsfirin

upidstay
05-30-2006, 11:04 AM
Well Stumped, seeing as you seem to be going for the most humane way of eliminating an insect that is purely beneficial and won't actually hurt anybody, I'd go with a general bee spray. It will kill them the fastest. The foaming stuff works great. If the lady wants to get rid of an insect that will polenate her flowers for her, and will only sting if you stick your hand down into the nest, then that is the way I'd go.

Chris@CRU
06-23-2006, 05:32 PM
Simply apply a dust insecticide to the area around the hole. The bees/ wasps will get the dust on themselves entering and exiting the hole. They will groom themselves vigorously to remove the foriegn matter from thier bodies and they will die.

tinman
07-22-2006, 06:46 PM
What's karma:confused:
What comes around goes around.

I don't think it applies to bees or yellow jackets.. they are evil.;) I gassed a family of Y Jackets last week so I hope karma does not apply to them.

sheshovel
07-22-2006, 07:04 PM
I am not eeeven going to say a word.
Well maybe a few words Pest Control Guy!
This is not your job to do. Don't risk having to take time off work because you were stung in the eye or went into anifilactic (sp)shock. I suggest you pass and suggest she call a person certified and qualified to take that risk. You don't know they could be Africanised bee's and they can be deadly.
Too bad people kill things that only help their gardens to be healthy.

Mic_bug
07-31-2006, 09:15 PM
are they drowned?

Pavel
08-02-2006, 05:28 PM
First off I know nothing about this stuff ... but just thinking about it, what would be wrong with finding out how deep and wide these nests are and if they are of limited size perhaps to put that bowl over the next to keep them from coming out and digging the whole next out. It would only work if bumble bee nests are small ... but it's worth looking into just in case Karma has bees on the list.

My dad used to keep several bee hives - and after a few stings it's not so bad ... good for rheumatism they say. :)