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View Full Version : Cutting Corners... Literally!


Chris Wagner
05-18-2006, 01:00 PM
Places with a lot of foot traffic, how do you combat the corners of the turf that get cut across?

I fight with this every year. I repair for the spring & summer months, but after the winter with them cutting corners when the ground is a like a sponge, it has no chance.

Ideas?

Grassmechanic
05-19-2006, 08:12 AM
Do like Michigan State University does. When they build a new building, they just put in grass everywhere but the main building entrances. The students then walk across the grass and wear it down to the dirt. That is where the additional sidewalks go in at. In your case, put concrete in at the corners.

MarcSmith
05-19-2006, 09:06 AM
We have concreted and and bricked to "round-off" the edges. but you give then an extra food, and before you know it, they are still cutting the corner.

I have all but given up....

here is several pics I took from 120' high reach two days ago while they were setting up the chairs for commencement. you can see a couple of dirty corners......Bythe time they are done they will have 10K chairs set up and you wont beable to see any grass except in the aisles.

Chris Wagner
05-28-2006, 11:05 AM
I was thinking of trying some brick on a few of the corners to see what effect that has.

The renovation in spring lasts through the fall... but it's the dormant grass in the winter time and the traffic then that wipes that work out.

I think Notre Dame did the same thing with traffic. They waited to see where the studnets walked the most and added extra concrete.

I was honestly hoping for a few secrets, but I suppose it's just something we deal with.

out4now
05-28-2006, 12:35 PM
We have concreted and and bricked to "round-off" the edges. but you give then an extra food, and before you know it, they are still cutting the corner.

I have all but given up....

here is several pics I took from 120' high reach two days ago while they were setting up the chairs for commencement. you can see a couple of dirty corners......Bythe time they are done they will have 10K chairs set up and you wont beable to see any grass except in the aisles.

In the above case what I see is simply poor design. Look at where the entrance is and then ask yourself why di dthey angle it that way and not put in a more direct access sidewalk?

ripple
05-29-2006, 09:08 PM
Rope it off and get some high traffic turf to grow in those places.....then once its healthy take down the ropes!

Chris Wagner
05-31-2006, 12:56 PM
Rope it off and get some high traffic turf to grow in those places.....then once its healthy take down the ropes!

That's a fix for the growing season... Spring through Fall... but no matter how well kept, winter traffic mats it down and kills it. I've tried high traffic seed, I've tried sod, I've seeded bluegrass. Too much compaction in the winter.

MarcSmith
05-31-2006, 01:04 PM
and of course the ice melt doesn't help either...

Grassmechanic
05-31-2006, 01:56 PM
and of course the ice melt doesn't help either...
Ever try a switch to potassium chloride??

Chris Wagner
05-31-2006, 03:24 PM
Nope, the salt doesn't help... but we use primarily Safe Step... mostly KCl.

Precision
06-02-2006, 06:31 AM
would reinforcing the area with geo-grid help any.

supposedly that allows vehicles to be driven over it, but that may just be a load issue.

MarcSmith
06-02-2006, 06:44 AM
I have a few area with the geo grid for emergency fire truck access. Not pretty turf. dries out faster and more prone to weeds...

Chris Wagner
06-07-2006, 03:09 PM
Any of the grid stuff in strictly high foot traffic areas? And, where you have it, is it irrigated?

MarcSmith
06-07-2006, 08:28 PM
none in any high traffic areas. In fact I'll take some pictures af the one area that is irrigated, but still dries out quickly. Thankfully its not a really High vis area.

we had several high rise jobs at TGLC that had the same problems. there was not much we could really do... I think if you had Hightraffic areas, with this stuff it would not be any better, andmaybe worse...

Chris Wagner
06-07-2006, 10:11 PM
Awesome info... I forget what website it was a while back, but I did look briefly into it. In fact, I think the promo material did have a fire truck on that area.

My high traffic corners are irrigated... which is good... but the winter foot traffic of kids going out to recess in the winter time with freezing / thawing conditions is just no match.

I am going to try widening the corners with some pavers this year. We'll see if they will just cut more in or if it is somewhat effective.

Precision
06-07-2006, 10:15 PM
Awesome info... I forget what website it was a while back, but I did look briefly into it. In fact, I think the promo material did have a fire truck on that area.

My high traffic corners are irrigated... which is good... but the winter foot traffic of kids going out to recess in the winter time with freezing / thawing conditions is just no match.

I am going to try widening the corners with some pavers this year. We'll see if they will just cut more in or if it is somewhat effective.
could you do a plant barrier. You know like a little hedgerow or something to make it less attractive. or do a path of pavers as opposed to paving in the entire corner?

I just hate the idea of more concrete.

MarcSmith
06-08-2006, 06:21 AM
One of things I do in year round from time to time is set up snow fencing and some portable barricades to help direct foot and golf cart traffic away from areas prone to damage. But it looks like sh1t.

Chris Wagner
06-08-2006, 03:33 PM
I tried a small landscape "scene" on the corners with mulch nearest the 90 degree corners. We plow our sidewalks in the winter time and a lot of the snow also ends up on the corners. Not too much we can do about that. Anyway, the weight on the evergreens wasn't good and they were pretty much asethetically destroyed the following spring. But I've been studying other schools and high traffic areas carefully.

Most interesting... the city of Chicago at Grant Park uses brick... but staggers the brick so there is grass in between the brick. So... from a short distance, it looks like the corners are just grass. Closer inspection reveals the brick. They are about at grade with the soil... probably slightly higher. Seemed effective.

Unfortunately, especially in the front of campus, orange fencing would probably not work well... too close to the church.

Maybe some pics will help?

MarcSmith
06-08-2006, 09:02 PM
chris I lost track of time while I was digging in the archives for some gravesite locations at one of our cemtaries....I totaly forgot to take pics. I wont be back at work until monday(comp day #2 on friday for the hard work at commencement) so I'm playing golf...:)
sorry...

Chris Wagner
06-13-2006, 01:19 PM
Gotta love comp time! Have fun!!

bushhogman
06-13-2006, 02:21 PM
Hey Chris,
I had the same problem at a local ruby Tuesdays that I maintained. I did two things that seem to help. On the corners that people really abused, I planted a thorny holly shrub and used river rock as a mulch,,also used metal edging. Folks still cut the corner but its hard to damage river rock,,,if you got to close to the shrubs you get stuck in the leg by a thorn!! You have to force them in the correct direction,,,,,one way or another!!!:hammerhead:

bushhogman

golfguy
06-15-2006, 10:37 PM
I have had a fair amount of experience with the grass pave product you guys previosly discussed. I agree with the sediments that it is a weak product.

However, I also have alot of experience with a product called Kormatt. It is easy to install, and holds up very well to abuse. I have one place where we used it for a construstion road and it is still green as can be with grass. I have also lined areas at the end of bridges and corners of cart paths. All hold up well.

To install, simply prepare the area as normal complete with seeding so it is flush with your area. Once complete, lay the Kormatt on top and staple in place. Grass will grow up through the holes and and the dimples of the product support the weight of traffic and prevent wear on the crowns of the plant.

I highly recommend that you try it.

1PRO
06-16-2006, 01:02 PM
Try to landscape the corners with raised beds and flag stone borders...small prerenials,etc and tie the beds to some small vinyl fenceing to make cutting corners into a focal point to the new landscaping.