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View Full Version : Do harley rakes blow hydraulic lines?


mr. niceguy
05-19-2006, 01:13 PM
Hi, noob here. I was looking for info on power rakes and stumbled on this site, where I've found not only a lot of good discussion about them but about a lot of other very relevant landscaping stuff. Nice place.

One thing I gathered in all the discussions about Harleyrakes and Rockhounds is the mention a couple of times about blown hydraulics from digging the drum of the Harley rake too deep. I've used a Rockhound before with no problems but it seems from what I've read here that a power rake is usually preferred if only one attachment is to be used. I have 75 tons of topsoil, 25 of it very rocky, and I plan to get a bobcat and probably a Harley type power rake. My one concern is that it may be prone to blowing a line from a moment or even a few seconds of hard grinding or hanging up.

I was hoping the unit could actually dig out half buried rocks of less than 4-5 inches, but I don't want to be constantly worrying about blowing a line.

Any advice?

Thanks,
Chip

Mike33
05-19-2006, 09:41 PM
I own a bobcat 185 and have had a 5a landscape rake for 10 years and very happy with it. Now im hearing about the harley rake , does any one have any pics of them. And how do they compare to the landscape rake?
Mike

AintNoFun
05-19-2006, 10:16 PM
i have a cat 248 with i think a 7 foot glenmac harley rake never had any problems. just bought a dingo as well with a harley rake haven't had any problems within the month we've had it. if its a concern for you i'd rent the setup just for that job if it breaks bring it back.....

Lawnworks
05-19-2006, 10:22 PM
What about having an extra pair of lines just in case? They can't be that much. I love my harley rake.

Cahsking
05-19-2006, 11:40 PM
I've ran a Cat 248a with a Harley rake for 2 years, as long as you understand your only prepping the top dressing the Harley rake will pay for itself ten fold. In other words don't try to excavate with it.

mr. niceguy
05-20-2006, 05:54 AM
Thanks for the responses everyone. I feel more confident going with the Harley rake now. One thing I was impressed with is that the manufacturer says it can be used to do small scale grading such as taking down high spots etc. I have one area about 50'x30' which needs to be be taken down by 2-3 inches. It was used as a dumpspot for 3-4 sized stone and has some residual stone pushed down in it. I'd like to be able to use the harley to cull these excess rocks and grade out the highspot. Is the Harley up to this task?

Mike, www.bobcat.com has a pic of their version of the Harley rake. They call it a power rake.

Mike33
05-20-2006, 02:32 PM
Thanks for the responses everyone. I feel more confident going with the Harley rake now. One thing I was impressed with is that the manufacturer says it can be used to do small scale grading such as taking down high spots etc. I have one area about 50'x30' which needs to be be taken down by 2-3 inches. It was used as a dumpspot for 3-4 sized stone and has some residual stone pushed down in it. I'd like to be able to use the harley to cull these excess rocks and grade out the highspot. Is the Harley up to this task?

Mike, www.bobcat.com has a pic of their version of the Harley rake. They call it a power rake.
Thanks but i have one.
Mike

mr. niceguy
05-20-2006, 04:14 PM
There's actually some confusion (at least there was with me) over names. Bobcat makes what they call a "landscaping rake", which is really the same as a rock hound. It catches rocks and puts them in a bucket. They also make a something called a "power rake", which is comparable to a Harley rake. It has toothed drum which windrows rocks and you have to go back and scoop'em up. Even though I like the convienience of having the rocks picked and scooped in one pass, I've read that the latter is a more versatile, allowing you to do spot grading, and it appears to be a bit better suited for bigger rocks within reason.

Mike33
05-20-2006, 08:28 PM
There's actually some confusion (at least there was with me) over names. Bobcat makes what they call a "landscaping rake", which is really the same as a rock hound. It catches rocks and puts them in a bucket. They also make a something called a "power rake", which is comparable to a Harley rake. It has toothed drum which windrows rocks and you have to go back and scoop'em up. Even though I like the convienience of having the rocks picked and scooped in one pass, I've read that the latter is a more versatile, allowing you to do spot grading, and it appears to be a bit better suited for bigger rocks within reason.
Nice to see someone close, i think about 1 hour drive. Im a bobcat man i own a landscape rake but i never heard of the power rake. I have had mine for 10 years and love it. I like the idea of raking and scooping up the debri at same time.
Mike

mr. niceguy
05-21-2006, 06:00 AM
Hey that's right, I just noticed that you're in Cumberland. I grew up in Rockville/Gaithersburg, but I'm probably closer to Cumberland now than I was when I lived in MD.

Mike33
05-21-2006, 09:43 PM
Hey that's right, I just noticed that you're in Cumberland. I grew up in Rockville/Gaithersburg, but I'm probably closer to Cumberland now than I was when I lived in MD.
check out my website phone etc. is there, need any thing give me a call
Mike
wwwbobcatservice33.com

mr. niceguy
05-22-2006, 11:40 AM
Mike, I checked out your site and was impressed. I should point out that I'm not a professional landscaper so you have to consider my untrained perspective. However I have done a lot of clearing and rough lanscaping work using skid steers and smaller backhoes on my own property. So far I've had close to 400 tons of fill and topsoil brought in to raise the grade of the area around my house. I've also done a lot of research into landscaping methods and techniques, so I do know a good job when I see one. I saw your hydro seeding pics and almost wished I hadn't already bought the seed, fertilizer and straw for my back yard. In particular the straw laying gets old pretty quick. Looks like you get some great results from the hydroseeding.

On the matter of harley rakes and rock hounds, after calling around to all the rental places and getting prices and rates for weekend use, I was reminded by one of the rental places that this coming weekend is Memorial Day and thus, I'l have to pay for two full days of rental (since they're closed Monday) instead of the usual 1-1/2 day rate for weekends. AGH! That's an extra 150 bucks.:hammerhead: I reckon I'll just have to do it, and use that extra time to do some clearing and clean up. I think I'm gonna go with the Harley rake and I'll give my two cents on it when I'm done.

Chip

Mike33
05-22-2006, 08:27 PM
Yeaa, let me know about the harley rake. That sucks with the holiday extra rental. Hydro seeding is slick and grows well. There is a guy in Winber who came down and looked at my seeder and bought one. I think the name was something like Stoke skid steer services 814-233-2170. He just bought a seeder like mine. I would get rid of the straw and hydro seed. I have had such bad luck with the straw we get any more producing so many weeds.
Mike

mr. niceguy
05-23-2006, 12:54 PM
:laugh: Seeds in straw eh? I was concerned about that when I did my front yard but what I hadn't counted on was sprouts in the topsoil I'd bought. I managed to get a hold of 50 tons of unscreened, fresh from the farm topsoil which had very few rocks, at about 12 bucks a ton ( a great price around here) The soil was excellent, but there was a lot of crappy field grass sprouts in it, and now, after having planted expensive seed I have these clumps of very fast growing grass which grow to a foot tall before the good grass is ready for mowing.:hammerhead: But your point is taken nonetheless. I'll have to reconsider whether I want to go through the hassle for what may be less than ideal results.

On the subject of hydro seed, as ballpark figure, what does it cost for hydroseeding an area of roughly 10,000 sq.ft., fairly open and level? Considering that the seed, fertilizer, and straw cost me about $200, I have a feeling hydro seeding more than I could afford, but it's also possible I could put off planting until near the end of summer and maybe save my dimes and nickles for some hydroseed (although my wife and kids are really eager to get a back yard).

Also, can you hydro seed over an existing lawn? Say if I were to plug aerate the daylights out of my front yard, could it then be hydroseeded with decent results? or would I need to hit the whole thing with round up beforehand? I normally pride myself on thoroughly scouring all the options but I'm a bit annoyed at myself now for not having investigated hydroseeding before now. I should've gotten informed a year ago when I did my front, but I just assumed that hydro seeding would be way too expensive. Of course I didn't properly consider the intangible costs such as having to go back and tend to areas with mediocre results, and the hassle of having to do the work myself. I'm a stay at home dad right now so I figure my time is worth about nothing from a labor stand point so I tend to think in terms of doing everything myself. Although, you've got me thinking now. Except one advantage of doing everything myself is that I've gotten quite a bit of experience driving machines and doing lot prep, grading, drain installation etc. I think as soon I'm free from the bonds of being a full time kid sitter, I might just see about getting into the landscaping profession.