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View Full Version : Tieing in homes to city water


CutRight
05-24-2006, 12:48 AM
There was just a big project around here where a whole section of town had just been provided piping for city water. its still under construction, but i want to bid on the work for tieing in the homes to line in the street. just wondering if any of you guys have done this and if you have a per foot price that is a general market price.

I have a friend that would work with me that owns a big site works company, they can pull all the necessary permits and have know how, i would learn as we go and i have the machine for the job. I talked to a guy i know in the company that layed all the main pipe and installed the pump station so I have somewhat of a connection.

I'm gonna be going door to door with flyers or something to try and get soem work...just seeing if theres any opinions out there.

Dirty Water
05-24-2006, 12:54 AM
Has the city already provided and installed water meters? If not, your going to need hot line tapping equipment to install the saddle tee's on the live line.

Usually out here they use 1" NSF 200 PSI rated poly after the meter, buried 24" down, of course, we don't get deep freezes out here. So a lot of domestic water lines are installed with a trencher. Much faster that way.

If you have to install the meters yourself, try to get a lot of customers and get a bulk discount, meters are really pricey.

CutRight
05-24-2006, 01:01 AM
all i know right now is there are turns at every house for an available hook up. its 1 inch copper pipe run to the house and a ball valve put inside the home on the other side of the foundation. im pretty sure the meters will be done separately unless the homeowner wants us to do it. otherwise everything at the street end is all set for hook up.

the water company hasnt yet figured out the assessment for these people to get city water, but about 20 of the houses are ready to be hooked up right now.

also the whole area is all well water so the wells have to be dead ended, which has to usually be subbed out to well guys who have to put in chemicals and all that stuff.

Dirty Water
05-24-2006, 01:03 AM
Why would anyone want to go from free water (well) to paying for it?

CutRight
05-24-2006, 01:22 AM
we have well water at my house and every year during the summer it dries up or goes low so we have to really watch how we use it. city water would stop that. if they ever put city water down our street we would definately tie into it. every few years me and my father have to do something to fix the well. we either have to change the pump, the lines, stuff like that. so city water gets rid of that.

so this area of town is centered around a lake and around the lake are only 40 foot lots, it used to be all septic systems, but in the 70s they put in city sewers because there was a bad septic contamination problem...just not enough space for the systems....so i would imagine that has something to do with it, the ground water might not be the best.

but you are correct, not everybody of those 400 houses will want to get city water.

Scag48
05-24-2006, 01:53 AM
Plus, the power to run the pump in the well costs quite a bit after a while as well. That's the biggest downside out here for wells, the cost of electricity.

BSDeality
05-24-2006, 02:06 AM
my cousin did/does tie-in's over in westchester county, NY I'll ask him what he charged on average next time I see him. He was using a very similar (although much older) Kubota mini-X. His background is in plumbing originally but he got into construction a couple years ago.

ksss
05-24-2006, 02:45 AM
I don't think any can give you a linear price that will reflect your conditions. Tying into existing homes can be many times more of a PITA than new. I would be aware of your utilities, gas seems to always be in the way. If your going into the ground be aware of OSHA's 5 foot rule (or less depending on ground conditions). A high profile job like that will get people's attention some good, some not good. I would try and bid each house individually. There will be many variables that you can't forsee until your on a particular house. I also would put together a very specific contract for this job. I can see it is possible that home owners could be a major PITA. Lastly make sure you have enough insurance. If you having to hot tap I would plan on a few O sh!ts and make sure your covered in case it turns into an O f^ck.

tylermckee
05-24-2006, 04:16 AM
I'm not sure if you said it or not, but would you be tapping into the mainline, or did they already stub the side services out? So you would only be going from meter box to house, correct?

Gravel Rat
05-24-2006, 04:38 AM
The district here puts in a tap off the main line and the home owner is responsible for anything past the tap. The main line needs to be tapped into the section of line on the road is turned off for the valve installment and turned back on.

Tapping into the new plastic main line is easy but in this area there is still runs of the old asbestos water pipe its a biatch to work with. The district is slowly getting rid of the old pipe and going to the blue plastic pipe and upgrading peoples services. No water meters here we just get charged a fee every couple months.

Local drilled wells have arsnic (sp) problems so people can't drink the water the local city water really isn't that great so we buy bottled water.

We have power outages here quite abit in the winter time as our powerlines are overhead on poles so when the wind blows and the trees fall knocks out the power. It can be a hour to a couple days depending on how much tree damage is done to the power lines. The people on wells are pretty much SOL they have to water because the pump doesn't work with no juice.

The people with wells have to watch out for the dry seasons you can run out of water. Well pumps are not cheap to replace either if you have a deep well like some are here your down 200 feet deep or more. That is one hell of a head of water to push so you need a good powerfull pump.

Scag48
05-24-2006, 10:29 AM
I'm curious as to how you'd even get a well in BC with all the rock.

murray83
05-24-2006, 10:58 AM
our company i work for does anything from a single home to a multi million dollar municipal contract.theres alot to these contracts than meets the eye and you could loose your shirt for a joke.

before even looking at this job what insurance do you have?,how many do you plan to bang off a day?,your mini might be ok but what if you run into rock?,are you tieing into the main and running the latteral to the meter box?,how many are you bidding on? all 400 or just a small chunk,as ksss mentioned you might have to invest into a trench box for this job like a modular unit we use on smaller jobs.

the last thing is when we bid we put down 10% of the tender price that maybe 10 grand or more you have to release for an amount of time.

Gravel Rat
05-24-2006, 02:29 PM
The well drillers have the proper drill heads for drilling the hard rock. Its good if you have rock that isn't fractured it saves on the well casing needed. The drilling contractor goes out to witch the property then they start drilling.

Like I meantioned we have arsenic in the well water and it at a high enough level that you shouldn't drink the water.

nac
05-26-2006, 11:00 PM
Are you just digging the trench from curb box to house? In NJ you have to be a licesed plumber to pull a permit for a water connection. If you are going into the road you have to be bonded.

CutRight
05-27-2006, 02:38 AM
1. there are connections stubbed out at each house off the main line. like someone said its up to the homeowner to tap into the stub off the mainline. The job would be running 1 inch copper pipe from the stub at the curb, no cutting the road, to the house, through the foundation, hilti drill a hole, protective sleeve, ball valve on the other side of the foundation....see you later bye.

2. i would technically be a subcontractor under my friends company who can pull any permit in the state of CT so thats no problem.

3. if we hit a rock, we would have to bring in one of their bigger machines,maybe rent a machine with a hammer. of course all of this would be worked out under contract if rock is hit.

4. I wouldnt be bidding on them all, you could prolly only do 2 a day if you got a rhythm going. Basically right now im just going to go by word of mouth to get some work on this project. My town is small so i know or know some one who knows a lot of people that live in this area.

we'll see how it goes.

Luvs2Play
05-27-2006, 03:05 AM
I used to put in the corporation valves on the mains, had to be done by the utilities, we ran pipe to the shutoff valve, from there it could be run to the house by a licensed plumber. The utilities department took care of it to the shutoff in the yard. Code here is at least 5', most were run with a mole, as the holes were already dug. Could run about 10 a day with four guys if they were all in the same area.