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View Full Version : Anyone Run An AVS RC 50 or 60?


Bob E G
05-25-2006, 12:10 PM
I'm thinking about getting an AVS RC 50-60. Never had one. I like the narrow width, torsion susp, and Cat controls.

Any pros, cons, advice? Also, how expensive to maintain undercarriage? Can you get 1000+ hours out of the undercarriage in dirt?

Thanks

Stroker
05-25-2006, 01:15 PM
I got to demo an RC60 last weekend and I own an RC100. No complaints from me about the strength of the machine or how they run. One thing to be on the lookout for however is if you are working in tight areas or around trees. The back of the machine is not as resistant to bumping into things as other machines are.

Tigerotor77W
05-25-2006, 08:52 PM
1000 hours in dirt, provided you follow good turning and track maintenance guidelines, is no big deal at all.

If you work in stone a lot, however, that may be another story.

My question is this: why not offer a steel-imbedded track as an option? I would bet that if this sort of track is designed well, contractors will flock to Cat -- with suspension and a stone-capable track, there should certainly be interest.

it excavate
05-26-2006, 02:03 AM
I've been doing a rent/demo on a takeuchi TL130, love the tracked machine over my wheeled one. Trying to sell my wheeled skidsteer and get the tracked one. Working in rocks is my big concern though, I'm really carefull with my excavator, but end up in more rocks with the skid steer. Anything special you guys with rubber tracked machines do when in hte rocks?

Digdeep
05-30-2006, 06:27 PM
Bob E G,

I own a RC50 and I've been very happy with the performance and undercarriage dependability so far. I bought it slightly used (demo unit) from my dealer and I've put about 780 hours on the tracks. The tracks are now approaching 1,000 hours and I would assume they'd at least go another 700-1,000 hours in my landscaping/excavating application. I used to sell Bobcat and the nimbleness and maneuverability of the RC50 can't be beat by any other machine IMHO. It will load a full sized truck, but it doesn't have the reach of some of the vertical loaders. However, if you're looking for a machine that is sensitive on all surfaces, has traction to spare, doesn't leave you pounded to death at the end of the day (try a rigid mounted track loader to see what I mean), and is built from the very beginning to act like a track loader (balanced, high ground clearance, excellent hp to weight ratio, and narrow) you won't go wrong. If I could add one feature to this machine it would be high flow, however, a 50hp/5,300lb machine would have a hard time driving a 26-30gpm pump. I would suggest that you demonstrate one in your application to see how it performs. Good luck in your search.

Planet Landscaping
09-27-2006, 05:55 AM
we R gonna test an RC 60 for snow and landscaping. Any bad stuff to say about em??????????????

Digdeep
09-29-2006, 07:52 PM
I don't own an RC60, but I own a RC50 and have operated the RC60. I focus on landscaping, however, I do quite a bit of snow removal in the winter up here in wisconsin. I don't think a wheeled skid compares to the RC50 when it comes to snow removal. I know that a set of chains works well when pushing snow, but I haven't ever had an issue with regards to traction. I can't say the same thing concerning the rigid tracked units. The down pressure on the bucket pushes the front of the tracks up an reduces traction. The suspension on the RC50 flexes up when I put down pressure on the blade or bucket and leaves my tracks on the ground. I can also pile the snow much higher with my RC50 compared to a skid. I can actually climb the pile to push it back further. I have built piles as high as some wheel loaders can. I think you'll find it extremely productive and dependable.

MikeAtv
09-30-2006, 04:49 AM
Have you guys checked out the RC80?