PDA

View Full Version : Lilac bushes


All_Clear
06-06-2006, 08:17 PM
Well not sure where to post this since we really dont have a Q&A on plants...

We have a Lilac bush on our personal property and it's already flowered/bloomed. Now I've read where you can take a clipping dip it in rooting powder and it will grow roots... I noticed that the bush has pods on it now... can i remove the pods to start new bushes? I'd like to make a natural break/fence between our property with the lilacs. The one there now is about 5 ft round and 10-12 ft tall, i realize new plants are not going to be instant break/fence.
I have enclosed a picture to show the pods i was talking about.

Thanks
All Clear

All_Clear
06-06-2006, 08:18 PM
oops forgot the pic...

Kate Butler
06-06-2006, 09:13 PM
Most lilacs are a bit tricky (and slow) to grow from seed. The exception is the Japanese tree lilac (syringa reticulata) which is a MAD SEEDER and grows quickly. The easiest way to propagate lilacs is by root cuttings. They are natural root spreaders and its a quick step to cut away a new sprout and replant wherever wanted.

All_Clear
06-06-2006, 10:21 PM
Most lilacs are a bit tricky (and slow) to grow from seed. The exception is the Japanese tree lilac (syringa reticulata) which is a MAD SEEDER and grows quickly. The easiest way to propagate lilacs is by root cuttings. They are natural root spreaders and its a quick step to cut away a new sprout and replant wherever wanted.

Ok so it would be better to just take some of the smaller/newer growth and replant... I was going to do that but i was afraid of ruining part of the plant by disturbing to much of the root system... how fragile are these plants?
Because if i understand correctly some of the roots or suckers as some call them come up as new growth/plant (basicly it spreads itself)

I've added a picture (not the best) of the bush our property line runs just a few feet of the brick houses drive way there... from the angle it's kind of hard to tell but there is like 8-10 feet between their drive and my gravel turn around... To the back or right in the picture there is a Lilac (tree type) that doesnt seem to seed or spread... the big main bush there is what i'd like right down the property line... (just even with the front of the brick house on back to the other lilac) rather then put up a 6 ft privacy fence, neighbor doesnt care and besides i take care of the few feet this side of the drive anyway.

Thanks
All Clear

Kate Butler
06-07-2006, 06:52 AM
Ok so it would be better to just take some of the smaller/newer growth and replant... I was going to do that but i was afraid of ruining part of the plant by disturbing to much of the root system... how fragile are these plants?
Because if i understand correctly some of the roots or suckers as some call them come up as new growth/plant (basicly it spreads itself)

I've added a picture (not the best) of the bush our property line runs just a few feet of the brick houses drive way there... from the angle it's kind of hard to tell but there is like 8-10 feet between their drive and my gravel turn around... To the back or right in the picture there is a Lilac (tree type) that doesnt seem to seed or spread... the big main bush there is what i'd like right down the property line... (just even with the front of the brick house on back to the other lilac) rather then put up a 6 ft privacy fence, neighbor doesnt care and besides i take care of the few feet this side of the drive anyway.

Thanks
All Clear

Yes, just dig and replant. You can come within 18" or so of the main stems without any significant damage. Imagine a circle around the center of the clump that encloses all of the big stems. It's probably at least 4' in diameter. A great many smaller stems (root shoots from previous years) will be outside this imaginary circle. Dig the outermost of these shoots. The root parts will be white (the underground bits), run more or less horizontally back toward the main clump, and NOT hold much soil when removed.

Clip off the top half of the aboveground part of the new plant. If it's large enough to be branchy (>3'), be selective and leave some of the junctures where the branches meet the main stem - so that it will regrow more bushy. If you want this hedge to happen more quickly, plant multiple root shoots in each hole.

If you can't plant 'em IMMEDIATELY, you can leave 'em in a bucket of water up to a couple of days. Be sure when you plant to water in well - total soil contact with no air pockets is particularly important because they have so few filamentous roots.

Lilacs are tough. You can dig shoots from all around the perimeter of your clump as long as you make an effort not to disturb the roots of the main clump (no backhoes, please). Use a sharp shovel and make the first cut where you expect the shoot to be coming from off the main plant. With some practice, you'll be able to gauge where to cut underground and still 'get' a foot of horizontal root. Then dig around it and pull it out.

On the subject of tree lilacs ... there are true tree lilacs and there are lilacs that are old enough to have grown into small trees. Japanese tree lilac (syringa reticulata) blooms very late (after other lilacs are long gone), are always creamy white, and the flower clusters are HUGE compared to regular lilacs. They make very ornamental seed pods and will grow new plants everywhere the seeds touch soil. So, it wouldn't be much of a seeder in a lawn.

All_Clear
06-07-2006, 09:39 PM
Thank you Kate, just the info i needed!

Looks like i'll be getting the shovel out next week!


Thanks
All Clear