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wmtom
06-20-2006, 09:30 PM
I have a John Deere CTL322 I only have 140 hrs on it. After running it for a couple hours you can notice a drop or loss in power. I do all the daily and hourly inspections when due. I have read the manual and it says drain the water separator I drain it almost daily now it will run good for an hour or two then the power drops. I am going to call my dealer tomorrow just thought I would ask while I was on here tonight. I have not changed the filter yet but plan to. Any thoughts.

Thanks
Mike Thomas

Construct'O
06-21-2006, 02:03 PM
Change the fuel fiter and the water separator filter.The fuel filter is the small one down on the fuel tank where the line comes out of the tank.I would change both ,not that hard or expensive.

Check the air cleaner also. Good luck!

wmtom
06-21-2006, 05:53 PM
picking up both filters tomorrow

Mike Thomas

icfbunt
11-13-2006, 08:26 AM
What do you think of the machine so far? I am going to be buying a track loader in a few months and would like some input,......have been looking at the ctl 322. Would like to hear from an owner.

thks......Larry

wmtom
11-13-2006, 07:39 PM
I like the machine, the power loss was bad diesel. The cab design could be better. But all in all the machine is good and the service I get from my dealer is second to none.

Mike Thomas

Canon Landscaping
11-13-2006, 10:45 PM
I own a ct 322 and it is a great machine we are very hard on it and it hasn't let us down yet. The pushing power is amazing and it will lift and carry about 5,000 lbs the tracks are holding up very well also.

icfbunt
11-14-2006, 08:00 AM
Thanks for the info guys,.........
I ran a t180 bobcat the other day and it was a nice machine but lacked power. I do backfilling, rough grading and move quite a bit of heavy dirt. The ctl322 is in the same class as the t180. I will not even consider a t180,......now it is a t250 and a gehl ctl60 as well as the john deere 322. I hear lots of people say the gehl ctl 60 and the deere 322 have tons of power. I know the bobcat lacks power, but the deere only has 6 more hp. You think it actually makes that much difference? If I go with bobcat I know I will need to cough up another 10,000 to go to the t250, but the gehl ctl60 and jd 322supposedly perform much better than the t180. Does anyone have any idea how close they are to the t250 as far as pushing capacity and actual power?:weightlifter:


thks....LARRY

dozerman21
11-14-2006, 10:15 PM
icfbunt- If you're comparing the CT322 to a Bobcat, the T-190 (K-Series) would be the closest match. The T-250 is a heavier machine. The Gehl has some nice specs, but you need to demo whichever machines you're considering. Specs and real world power are two different things. Don't let the engine H.P. fool you. It matters, but there are many variables that go into how well a machine performs. I have the CT332 and I traded in a T-300 for it. I've been very happy with the machine. I do the same kind of work as you, but I use a dozer the majority of the time. I have been very impressed with the push power (tractive effort) of the Deere. It also has very good lift and breakout power, and those three things are crucial for how I use mine. The 2-speed is nice too!

Here's a link comparing the Gehl, Bobcat, and Deere. http://www.deere.com/specsapp/servlet/com.deere.u90785.specscompare.view.servlets.SpecsCompareServlet

I would definetly demo all 3 to see which machine best suites you.

icfbunt
11-15-2006, 08:36 AM
dozerman21, thanks for then info. I do know the 322 and the t190 are in the same class. I also know the 190 is underpowered. From what other people have said, the 322 pushes circles around the 190, which would make it closer to the t250. (not sure how close though).

Do you have a dozer or combo blade for your 332? If so, can you do some decent dozing? I dont operate a dozer, so I would like to use the 332 to do rough grading which does, at times involve pushing some heavy clay around.
Do you think the 332 would do a decent job with this?

Also, I have seen the 322, but never the 332. Is this machine quite a bit larger than the 322? Looks like it weighs a bit more. Just don't want a big clumsy machine,...........

thks....Larry

dozerman21
11-15-2006, 09:38 AM
The T-250 and T-300 are in the same class as the CT332. The main difference between the two Bobcat models is the T-250 is radius lift and the T-300 is vertical lift. The CT332 is also vertical lift. I like the vertical lift because I load trucks with mine, and occasionally I'll work in tight spots where every inch counts. The CT332 is definetly heavier (around 2,500lbs.) than the CT322. It is also probably around 10K more, just guessing. It is a better pusher though, and it will have more grunt for the heavy lifting and hard clay. The tracks are wider so you'll have a lower ground pressure. I have the 84" construction bucket with a bolt on cutting edge. The design of the bucket gives you good visibility and also cuts and grades good. It doesn't have quite the capacity of Bobcat's 80" construction bucket, but it doesn't have as much spillage either, due to better rollback and smoother ride.

As far as the dozer blade, I don't like them for skid or track loaders. We bought a heavy duty one for our 1845C skid, and it just doesn't grade good. You bounce around too much and it makes the machine front end heavy. I have not tried it on a CTL, so it might do a little better, but I'd rather use my dozer. Having said that, I do think some of the new smaller blades that the OEM's sell would be ideal for cutting swales between houses or other tight areas. I think you would be better off though just using the bucket, or maybe a 4 in 1 would benefit you better.

I would check out the CT332. It doesn't seem bulky or clumsy to me at all. It has good visibility and it's a well engineered, powerful machine. After putting about 250 hours on mine, the I only have a couple of complaints. It burns more fuel per hour than the T-300 (I do run it wide open and this is usually the case with a bigger machine), and when you work in dusty conditions, the cab will let dust in more so than the Bobcat's cab did. I'm going to put some weatherstripping where the cab meets the frame and I think that will help. Neither complaint is that bad, but they could be better.

Go to www.deere.com to compare the CT332 and CT322, or any other brands. I would demo both machines and see if the smaller machine is all you need, and you'll save some money. If you need more power and a heavier machine, I think the CT332 would work good for ya.

icfbunt
11-15-2006, 10:22 AM
Dozerman, forgot ta ask ya one more thing. Is the two speed actually worth the extra 2000 bucks? Looks like ya only get about another 1 mph or so out of the 2 speed. I got a price for a gehl ctl70 and I'm gonna go to my deere dealer and have him match the price.

Thks!!!!

dozerman21
11-15-2006, 03:01 PM
icfbunt- I would recommend the 2-speed. I know it doesn't sound like much, but that extra 1.6 mph on the CT332 makes a big difference when you have to carry material a long distance. On the CT322 it's even better at a 2.4 mph difference, with a higher top speed. If you don't ever have two run on the street, or just carry material for a long distance, it probably wouldn't be worth it to you. It's a tall gear, so you don't want to push in second, however, I do occasionally do light grading in second if the ground is solid and the material is light. One more thing, since the 2-speed is an option that will stay around for a long time, you will get more for it when you trade it in or sell it.

I don't use the 2-speed all the time, but it sure is nice when I need it!:cool2:
Good Luck and keep us posted on what you decide to get!

icfbunt
11-16-2006, 09:18 AM
Dozerman, thanks for your input!!. Yesterday out of the blue a case dealer stopped by. He is going to bring out a 440ct for me to try out. I checked out the specs on this thing. LOTS of power and torque for this type of machine. I think it has something like 89 gross hp. We'll see how if performs. Regardless of how it performs, I'll still be a bit skeptical since this is their first year out (I think) with these things.

I'll keep ya posted.


...Larry

Scag48
11-16-2006, 02:24 PM
All I'm going to say is that if this is your first machine please make certain that you actually need a tracked machine. Getting a tracked machine which is maintenance intensive (compared to a wheeled machine) is a decision that needs to be carefully analyzed. It's a trend by salesman and trade magazines to push tracked machines ahead of skid steers when this simply is not true. A tracked machine will destroy your bottom line if you're not using them in the appropriate operation. Something to consider.

ksss
11-16-2006, 10:45 PM
That 440CT is an animal. The CASE tracked machines have been out for several years the 440CT is new but it runs the same undercarriage as the 445 and 450 only a little smaller. The 440CT out performed the TK140, CAT 277 and Bobcat T250 in all testing criteria that encompassed excavating, and pushing material. They are now available in pilot controls. Although I doubt your dealer has one of those yet. The dealer here got a 440CT in and it went out on a demo and never came back. The guy running it cannot belive that a machine that size can push like that one can. The 440 not only has a lot of hp, the torque rating and its curve are very impressive. They are surely worth a demo.

Also what scag says is also very true.

Scag48
11-16-2006, 11:40 PM
I don't have a single doubt in my mind that the 440CT is the best tracked machine on the market today. But, one must have the need for a tracked machine. I still liked our 277B, nice machine, performed in our application very well, it's just that the costs of ownership didn't quite pencil out.

Tigerotor77W
11-17-2006, 01:20 AM
Aww, Scag, don't jump ship on us! I'm too engrossed in school work to lay it out, but I'll bet you that a really good Cat operator can make any other machine seem weak. :D

Scag48
11-17-2006, 02:27 AM
You know, I think it has a lot to do with the operator. Who knows, I might get a in a 440CT and not be impressed when compared to a 277B, but on paper the 440CT should win the shootout. It really comes down to personal preference and dealer support, but some machines are better than others. However, between Cat and Case, I think the decision should be down to dealer support and your preference as I believe they are both great machines. Case might have a bit of an edge performance wise on paper, but if the machine doesn't feel right and your dealer support sucks, what good is it?

Canon Landscaping
11-17-2006, 09:41 AM
I think tracks are the only way to go unless you only work on pavement or on shot rock or something similar. But if you buy a Cat track machine you will go broke when it comes time to replace the tracks and the Cat undercarriage is not as durable as the rigged system used by every other manufacturer. I priced a set of tracks for my 322 and i can get a set for $2,000. A set of tires cost $800 and you have to buy over the tire tracks and take them on and off and they cost like $3,000 and they rob the machine of power and you still have flats and you can't run across pavement.

thepawnshop
11-17-2006, 09:04 PM
I have owned both, and honstly will never go back to a rubber tire machine. The added ability that the tracks give you are well worth the added expense. I think they all do a great job, though I am partial to the JD 322/332 CTL's but to me it really boils down to who can give you the best service. If you Deere dealer has a reputation for great service, then go with Deere, but if they don't, then look elsewhere. Good Luck!

icfbunt
11-17-2006, 09:45 PM
I really like the Deer track loaders as well. The only thing I wish they had is a radial lift machine. I am going to be doing mostly grading and moving dirt/stone. I am concerned about all the pivot points on a vertical lift machine wearing out. Have these things come far enough along yet where the linkage type should not be a concern for wear, or is it still a legitimate concern? I have never owned a vertical lift machine, so I have no idea what kind of wear is expected. Do you guys with vertical lift machines see more wear than a typical radial machine??


thks,,,,,Larry

Scag48
11-17-2006, 10:01 PM
Eh, the Deere machines still have issues with lateral play in the pins and bushings. That's just how they are I guess. If you can deal with that, the rest of the machine is on par, minus the loud engine and weird cab layout.

ksss
11-19-2006, 12:36 PM
I am curious if Deere beefed up their loader linkage for the tracked machines or if it is the same as the wheeled machines? The last couple posts made me ponder if the added force generated by the track system would accelerate that wear or if they will wear at the same rate as the wheeled machines. As far as vertical lifts in general, I have never had any additional costs associated with the vertical lift except more grease. However I don't keep the machines for five thousand hours either.

AtoZ
11-21-2006, 12:52 AM
I have a vertical lift New Holland and can tell you that vertical lift machines hold up just fine. I beat the crap out of the machine all day long. It has 1900 hours on it now and still runs like new. I rip out tree stumps, haul pallets that weigh over 3,000 lbs, move 100 tons of top soil a day and whatever else has to be done. The bushings have never been replaced so there is a little play in the joints, but that's to be expected for a machine that works for a living... Most important thing you can do, grease, grease, grease!!!

Henry
11-24-2006, 08:00 AM
I own a ct 322 and it is a great machine we are very hard on it and it hasn't let us down yet. The pushing power is amazing and it will lift and carry about 5,000 lbs the tracks are holding up very well also.

Is this a typo? I'm interested in a 322 also but want to make sure it can move pallets of pavers and wall block. 5k lbs. seems high to me but I have a demo set up for Teusday so we'll find out.

dozerman21
11-24-2006, 10:31 AM
The CT332 has a 6,400LB. tipping load, with a 3,410LB. boom lift. You can go to www.deere.com for all the specs. I know a landscaper with one who has no problems unloading full pallets of sod from a trailer and moving them around. I don't think you should have any problems moving pavers and wall block either. I've done it easily with mine, but I have the CT332. I do think that it might struggle unloading a full pallet of pavers from a flatbet trailer, but I don't know for sure. It all depends on what the pallet weighs. Maybe Canon or someone else will chime in. They are very nice machines though.

Canon Landscaping
11-24-2006, 12:09 PM
We operate two supply yards and we use big concrete block for the walls of our bins and they weigh about 4500-5000 and we can unload them from a semi using a chain and having the chain about half way out on the forks.

Henry
11-24-2006, 12:59 PM
Thanks canon, that pic almost has me sold.

thepawnshop
11-25-2006, 10:09 PM
My 322 can barely pick a 4,000 lb pallet of retaining wall block off the ground. I love the machine, but it can't seem to pick up the weights that every other 322 operator speaks of. I have had it looked at, but havent had a pallet to play with since. I think my machine is having some type of hydraulic issue, though.

hdwsales
11-26-2006, 11:07 AM
Hi Guys,
Here is a John deere site that shows videos of some of their compact equipment.
They are comparing them to other brands. It's a deere site so of course deere comes out on top. I was mostly curious about your thoughts on the pushing power of the 322 and 332 compared to other brands, is deere really that much, better? Also what about the relief valve on the cat, I find it hard to beleive that it underperforms like they show in the video.
I am looking to add maybe a 322 to my fleet and was curious.

Thanks for you input
Dave

Henry
11-26-2006, 11:11 AM
Canon, what would you say those pallets weigh? I was looking through a techo bloc catalog and see that most of the materials are under 4k lbs. The only thing I can think of that would weigh more is a pallet of keystone standards, which we rarely use.

Tigerotor77W
11-26-2006, 01:34 PM
hdw -- I think all settings can be adjusted so that the manufacturer comes out on top. It's also possible that the Deere feathered the controls so that its drive motors were giving maximum torque, where for the Bobcat, the guy just feathered a little, then gunned them forward bit by bit in order to kill the engine. In particular, the relief setting on the Cat can be adjusted quite largely -- there was a 287B this summer (that I loved to operate because it was easy to stall) that would spin its tracks while digging. It all depends on where that relief is set.

Personally, I think the marketing on those videos is bogus... and I sincerely hope that the competition knows how to sell against Deere by now.

ksss
11-26-2006, 01:36 PM
I found the same thing to be true during testing in AZ this last winter. The CAT tracked machine (277B from rental fleet) was not able to push loads that others could. The CAT really struggled in situations when it could not generate momentum. When the excercise required digging into the hard AZ caliche, the CAT very much struggled. There were testing areas that the CAT excelled in and dominated, (control feel and operator comfort) but those areas were not in the excavating side of things. The machines that were present were TK140, Bobcat T250 CAT 277B, CASE 440CT and CASE 445CT. The most dominate machine in the excavation excercises was the CASE 440CT. Hands down the most efficient machine at putting power to the ground.

Digdeep
11-26-2006, 04:03 PM
I got an ASV DVD from my salesman that shows the new SR80 compared to most of the brands (Bobcat, Deere, Takeuchi, New Holland, Case) in tractive effort, flotation, ground clearance, traction up a slope, speed, etc. I think that the closest machine to the SR80 in tractive effort was the Bobcat. ASV shows a scale attached to a chain and you get a view of the scale and the weight that it pulls. If i remember correctly the SR80 outpulled all of them even though it was the lightest machine. As someone posted earlier, the companies can run these comparison test, but the customer must verify the stated results themselves to ensure that hydraulics weren't jacked up and the test is balanced. It was a pretty impressive video though.

Tigerotor77W
11-26-2006, 09:27 PM
Digdeep -- does that DVD have a name? I'd like to request a copy from my dealer as well.

(No obligation to reply here if you don't want to -- either via PM or not at all is fine, too)

Henry
11-27-2006, 10:46 PM
Canon and hdwsales, do you have the electric quick tach? If so, how do you like it? I don't understand the reason for it being electric instead of hydraulic.

Canon Landscaping
11-27-2006, 11:23 PM
I have the hydraulic system it works great deere switched to the electric system so they could offer high flow and quick attach.

Henry
11-28-2006, 10:27 PM
The demo machine arrived today and I can't believe how loud it is. I was able to lift a pallet with 41 keystone compacs from our trailer but not a full pallet, which is 48. 5K lbs seems impossible. I'll definitely need a couple more days to decide on this.

ksss
11-29-2006, 02:51 AM
I agree with Tigerotor that the videos are largely for display. Its kinda like the comercial where the Ford 6.0 350 pulls the semi out of the tunnel so the ambulance can get by. Realistic no, I am not a Ford guy but that commercial is cool. Deere has always liked those videos. They had a similiar one when they released the 200 series. It showed CASE and Bobcat stalling going up hills that the 270 could traverse. I happened to talk to one of the operators in that video during CONEXPO one year. He stood by the video's validity. I could only laugh. The operators of the competative machines were obviously trying to kill the machines going up the hill.

I think video's like that are successful for a couple of reasons 1. The buyer may buy strictly on the merits of the video. These are most likely Deere customers already or those that don't put much research into their equipment purchases and are easily impressed(I am not saying Deere customers don't research their purchases, only that they don't need any more information as they are a Deere customer already) 2. The more informed buyer may at least demo a Deere based on the video where the buyer may not have considered a Deere prior to the video. That is the person I think Deere most wants to target with the video. 3. It generates talk both on the internet and at dealerships and water fountains around the dirt moving industry. That also is very helpful, even if you hold the video and its outcome with suspect you've watched it and now your talking about it, maybe next you'll want to see for yourself. That may lead to a sale.

Deere is aggressive with their marketing both in sales literature and open solicitation. I have been called three times since Spring wanting to know if I wanted to demo a Deere. Anything Deere skid steer, tracked loader, excavator they didn't care. I have never got calls from CAT, Bobcat, Volvo or CASE for that matter like that (meaning from the factory not the local dealership). I think its smart marketing. The more buyers that demo your equipment 1. the more machines you sell and 2. if you listening to what these guys are telling you, your learning what operators of competative equipment have to say about your machine. Thus providing information on product improvement and areas to help expand your marketshare by capturing marketshare from other OEM's.

I am not a Deere fan boy by anymeans but I think their marketing makes sense to me.

AWJ Services
11-29-2006, 09:44 AM
The demo machine arrived today and I can't believe how loud it is.

Neither could I.


I was able to lift a pallet with 41 keystone compacs from our trailer but not a full pallet, which is 48. 5K lbs seems impossible. I'll definitely need a couple more days to decide on this.

It really does not matter what any machine will do for anyone else.It only matters what it will do for you.
The Deere I demoed seemed much stronger lift wise if the the boom was starting from a raised position rather than a off the ground.

In regards too all those videos I refer back too the old saying

"Are You Buying or Are You Selling"


I dwelled on lift capacity at first then I sat down and penciled out what my Skid Steer would be used for.
I went through all my jobs and calls over the last couple of years and dirt moving/excavating came out on top as most most glaring weakness and greatest need.
Look past Brands and the Color of the machine.Buy what will make you happy.

cdawg02
11-29-2006, 12:07 PM
I got an ASV DVD from my salesman that shows the new SR80 compared to most of the brands (Bobcat, Deere, Takeuchi, New Holland, Case) in tractive effort, flotation, ground clearance, traction up a slope, speed, etc. I think that the closest machine to the SR80 in tractive effort was the Bobcat. ASV shows a scale attached to a chain and you get a view of the scale and the weight that it pulls. If i remember correctly the SR80 outpulled all of them even though it was the lightest machine.

i don't buy it. if they have such great tractive force, why don't they publish that spec like everyone else does (except cat and maybe new holland). i find it hard to believe that the asv has more tractive force than a takeuchi. the only thing that machine is good for is landscape applications.

cdawg02
11-29-2006, 12:10 PM
but like everyone says, it's about the application and what you need out of a machine. asv does ride great.

Tigerotor77W
11-29-2006, 07:22 PM
cdawg2: there isn't a specific specification for rating tractive effort or "push force." I believe most manufacturers do it differently. In addition, even if the ASV did have the highest rating, there's nothing to prove that ASV didn't tweak the settings prior to shooting film. It looks like you work for Takeuchi (by location and picture :D), so welcome to the site! BTW, Bobcat doesn't publish any torques in its literature -- only in technical specifications for the dealerships. :)

AWJ Services: that observation is logical (from one point of view) because the Deere cylinders start off mostly horizontal and do not apply load in the direction of motion (up). However, once the load is up, the cylinders are being to point up -- applying load in the direction the load is moving.

ksss
11-29-2006, 09:55 PM
I am no engineer but in other types of equipment (excavators specifically) the tractive effort or draw bar pull is very close to the weight of the machine. I have not seen the ASV video but mathmatcially I don't see how a lighter machine can generate more pull than machines that weigh more. Granted this assumes that the machine has enough hp and torque to pull its weight. I believe they all do. The TK is damn heavy and has the highest hp ratings in its class. The Deere and CASE are also have a high weight to hp ratio. The CASE machine has particularly high torque rating. Perhaps the ASV has a longer track and therefore is able to keep pulling while others spin out. However I would think too much track and not enough weight would also spin out. Tigerotor enlighten me.

JDSKIDSTEER
11-29-2006, 11:18 PM
hdw -- I think all settings can be adjusted so that the manufacturer comes out on top. It's also possible that the Deere feathered the controls so that its drive motors were giving maximum torque, where for the Bobcat, the guy just feathered a little, then gunned them forward bit by bit in order to kill the engine. In particular, the relief setting on the Cat can be adjusted quite largely -- there was a 287B this summer (that I loved to operate because it was easy to stall) that would spin its tracks while digging. It all depends on where that relief is set.

Personally, I think the marketing on those videos is bogus... and I sincerely hope that the competition knows how to sell against Deere by now.

I always encourage my potental customers to have the compitition bring out their comparable size machine and demo them at the same time if they will. We always out push and out lift. Deere's weak points loud cab and dusty cabs. Never hear complaint about boom sway although they do it does not seem to be a problem. New presurized cabs and joy stick as a option are in the future. Not sure how far off though.

ksss
11-30-2006, 12:25 AM
How can the boom sway not be a problem? I see it as potential safety hazard. Working on side slopes with the bucket raised is quite dangerous with any amount of slap in the lift linkage. I find it difficult to believe that Deere by design built that boom to sway like it does. Especially since the sway is much more pronounced after they get some hours on them.

AWJ Services
11-30-2006, 12:38 AM
We always out push and out lift.

The CT 322 i tested in no way would come close too the Takeuchi 140 in the pushing category and was close in the lifting.

Moving dirt and grading the Takeuchi walked circles around it.
But the Takeuchi was a bigger machine than the CT322 .

Here they were just a few thousand dollars apart in price no matter the size difference.

Ultimatly price is the only fair comparisson not just size and lift classification.

Digdeep
11-30-2006, 12:50 AM
I went and dug out that DVD again, but boy am I a pack rat. ASV is careful to point out each machines weight and the percentage of the machine's weight that it can pull. As an example, the narrator states the machines weight as tested and then reports the actual traction in pounds. The soil conditions appear to be the same for all of the machines. The ASV pulled the same amount in poundage as the Deere, both had a tractive effort of 7,100lbs, the Bobcat was a couple hundred pounds less (and came in second as compared to both it's pull force as a percentage to it's operating weight, and so on. The New Holland had the lowest poundage. the interesting thing that the narrator pointed out was that even the the SR80 had an operating weight that was 1,700lbs lighter than the John Deere 332 it pulled the same amount on the scale. The reasons given were that the machine is built from the ground up to be a tracked machine with a 50/50 weight distribution (the video said that all of the other machines with the exception of the TL140 were built on a skid steer chassis with skid steer chassis weight distributions. It also stated the SR80 had more track surface on the ground with more contact points (wheels) transmitting the machines weight to the ground, thus giving it greater traction. this skid steer chassis weight distribution point is very very evident when the machines climb a hill in the video as you can see all of them tilt back onto their rear bumpers as they try to climb a hill follwing right behind the SR80. The video is called: When comparing 80hp Class Rubber Track Loaders...you only have two choices. the point I beleive that they are trying to make is that all of the other machines utilize a similar undercarriage design, use an existing skid steer chassis (except for the TL140), and that this compromises traction, ride, width, ground clearance, traction flotation, etc.

dozerman21
11-30-2006, 01:43 AM
The SR-80 looks like it's put together nicely, and is probably a good machine. I haven't ran any ASV's but I sat in the SR-80 at a trade show. I just don't like the undercarriage. I prefer the simpler rigid design. JMO.

I saw the Deere DVD before I bought my CT332, but I already knew I was going to buy the machine from comparing and trying other brands first. I got a kick out of some the tests, but some of comparisons are legit and not just fabricated by the operator(s). It is a good selling point though.

As far as the boom slop is concerned, I think it gets blown out of proportion. I know guys with high hours on the 200 series that may have more play than other brands of skids, but not enough to effect performance or be a real safety hazard. If you're working on a slope with the bucket in the air, especially if it's loaded, you know you have to be more careful regardless. I'm not saying Deere shouldn't continue to try to make it better, I just think it gets overplayed. I guess I look at it like a minor flaw (on some machines) that you as the operator adjust to. Just like every other machine has some kind of "hitch". The Deere is more balanced than any other skid that I've ran, and it's a big plus. The way the boom arms are designed gives it it's good weight distribution- like the New Hollands. I haven't been around as many NH's and I don't know if they have the same play in theirs or not, since they are similar designs. Nice machines too.

AWJ Services
11-30-2006, 08:32 AM
The reasons given were that the machine is built from the ground up to be a tracked machine with a 50/50 weight distribution (the video said that all of the other machines with the exception of the TL140 were built on a skid steer chassis with skid steer chassis weight distributions.

Was there any weight in the bucket?

How much tractive forced did it have going backward back dragging a dirt pile?

All machines weight bias are never static ,they are dynamic.
They are ever changing depending on the job so why test it any other way.

The dagger in the CT 322 for me was when I pushed over a small tree and I went down a slight incline and grabbed it by curling the bucket down with the teeth teeth and tried too back out pulling the tree .
It was very humorous too say the least.The tracks were almost free Wheeling.
I spent a couple hours with a field engineer talking about the machine and they did not like my point of view.


Trust me my Takeuchi can stand for some improvement as well and do not think I am singling out Deere either as the only one with problems.

cdawg02
11-30-2006, 01:23 PM
tigerroto: no...but i do see how it could look that way. i actually have a friend who works there. he invited me out to watch their sales guys operating the machines. got some cool pics. anyway, thanks for welcoming me to the site.

Construct'O
11-30-2006, 02:22 PM
AWJ did the Deere 322 that you demo have the 12" tracks or the 17" (which is an option] ? How wide are the ones on your TL140? Track size will make a difference on performance.

Plus you also mentioned the TL140 was a bigger machine on other post.

To be fair to the Deere,in your opinion do you think the track size with the undersize machine would have made a difference on how the two performed at the time of the demo????????

AWJ Services
11-30-2006, 07:53 PM
AWJ did the Deere 322 that you demo have the 12" tracks or the 17" (which is an option] ? How wide are the ones on your TL140? Track size will make a difference on performance.

The Deere had the smaller tracks and the Takeuchi had the 18 inch tracks.

I see your point but all the tests are done with the small tracks.
I also do not think the wide tracks would help either.

I had a slight grade too smooth and the machine could only excavate going down hill.
The Takeuchi would dig going up and down on the same hill.

I am a firm believer that units should be compared by price range only and nothing else.

The safety features on the JD are a pita too say the least.
The door has too be closed too reach the key too start it.
The machine would not move with the door open either.
I think I would probally buy a JCB before a JD .

As I said before I needed a machine that could really move some dirt and I regularly clear small lots with it.

I am anxious too demo the Case as soon as they get Pilots.
They seem too be the only other machine design for heavy excavating.

I would also recommend that anyone set a Takeuchi beside any skid steer and compare the thickness of the metal in the lift arms and also the overall bulk of the arms and quality of build.
They are so overkill.

ksss
12-01-2006, 06:12 PM
CASE released the pilots to be ordered several weeks ago. Get a demo with the pilots I am anxious to hear what people think.

Scag48
12-02-2006, 03:41 AM
CASE released the pilots to be ordered several weeks ago. Get a demo with the pilots I am anxious to hear what people think.

As am I. I wish Case had a dealer closer to us.