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CletusT
06-22-2006, 04:40 PM
Has anyone heard anything good or bad about Riviera Bermuda? I have about 56,000 square feet of sparce fescue that I would like to overseed with Riviera.

Since my yard has a decent slope to it I don't want to go the route of killing off the fescue entirely, so as to try and stop runoff. I have a pretty hard packed clay soil. I've been running the sprinkler system twice a day (early morning and late afternoon) for 20 minutes per zone, and it is still hard as a rock. My plan right now is to cut the fescue really short (will probably kill the fescue with these temps) and have the entire yard core aerated and topdressed with a mixture of about 85% sand, and 15% peat. Next, seed and water until germination. Then apply starter fert. after germination. Does this sound right? Any tricks for seeding that really small Bermuda Seed? I would assume that a drop spreader would be better for this than a broadcast spreader. As expensive as Riviera seed is, I'd hate to screw this up too bad......

Also,

I'm getting the soil tested before seeding. Is there any rule as to when you can seed after applying lime?

CletusT
06-23-2006, 01:36 PM
anyone got any info on Riviera?

ThreeWide
06-23-2006, 10:56 PM
I have lots of info for you.

Do this link to see what I posted here last year.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=116088&highlight=bermuda+seed

Also, attached is a PDF showing how my project went.

ThreeWide
06-23-2006, 11:17 PM
Riviera produces great looking turf. Areas of my lawn now look just as good as 419 sod. Very dense turf when it is managed properly.

One thing I can tell you about seeding Riviera, or any Bermuda seed for that matter, is that seed to soil contact is critical. This means you should spray out any existing grass in that area before seeding. Ideally you should rototill the area as well to provide a soft seedbed. I tried your intended method and had problems.

Since you are on a slope, you might consider having the Riviera applied by a hydroseeder. This will include enough mulch material to keep the seed from washing before germination. I had difficulty getting the seed to germinate on a slope in my lawn.

You can apply this seed in a broadcast spreader if you mix it with lime. Be sure to purchase the micro prill lime. If you go the hydroseeding route, this won't be a concern.

Since I did not get full coverage last year due to excessive rainfall and little sunlight, the lawn was overseeded with Perennial Rye this past Fall. That naturally was hard on the new grass. Now that I'm trying to get full coverage with the Riviera this year, we have had a drought the past 2 months. With normal weather, I would have good density by now. Hopefully you have an irrigation system.

Your plan on using a starter is good, but apply it when you seed. Once you get new plants growing you should then fertilize weekly until September. Alternate with 19-19-19 and 46-0-0.

Be sure to have plenty of Drive available to spray crabgrass from time to time. Crabgrass will be a problem as you cannot apply preemergent. Hopefully you did not already. Drive will not harm your new Bermuda. Products I mention here cannot be purchased in common retail stores.

hmartin
06-26-2006, 06:00 PM
Was this site irrigated? I didn't realize that much fertilizer was needed. I will try your methods next time I get a chance. Do you use that much N on sod installs also?

ThreeWide
06-26-2006, 06:49 PM
No automatic irrigation, but there were manual sprinklers put out on occasion but not regularly.

As far as new sod goes, during the first 30 days I like to do 3 applications about 10 days apart. First is a starter fert (18-24-12) with Ronstar if appropriate, then 46-0-0 and the last application can be 18-18-18 or more 46-0-0 depending on how well things are progressing. I've done this for a few customers this year and it has been a big hit. This even works for an exsiting lawn that has been neglected. In those cases, weed controls are also part of it. You can change a Bermuda lawn from crap to cream in 30 days.

ThreeWide
06-26-2006, 06:50 PM
No automatic irrigation, but there were manual sprinklers put out on occasion but not regularly.

As far as new sod goes, during the first 30 days I like to do 3 applications about 10 days apart. First is a starter fert (18-24-12) with Ronstar if appropriate, then 46-0-0 (1/2) and the last application can be 18-18-18 (1/2) or more 46-0-0 (1/2) depending on how well things are progressing. I've done this for a few customers this year and it has been a big hit. This even works for an exsiting lawn that has been neglected. In those cases, weed controls are also part of it. You can change a Bermuda lawn from crap to cream in 30 days.

CletusT
06-27-2006, 11:48 AM
TurfUnlimited,

Sorry I haven't responded yet, I've been out of town all weekend. Thanks for all the info. The Fescue in my yard is pretty sparce right now. It was seeded last September and came up enough to help stop erosion, but thats about it. Even with irrigation and one round of fertilizer in the spring, its pretty much crap right now. I guess I'll wait to see how it looks after the aeration and topdressing to decide whether to kill off the fescue before putting down the bermuda, or just try and seed it in. I really don't think that I'll have too much problem getting seed to the ground on most of my yard. The fertilier info was very helpful. I'll try to take some before and after pics and let y'all know how it turned out.