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dogchapman
06-24-2006, 01:41 PM
I have recently upgraded my equipment to include a TORO 36 Proline HYDRO.
This mower is a floating deck. Does anyone have advice to reduce scalping?
THANKS

rodfather
06-24-2006, 02:38 PM
A 36" mower with a floating deck should not scalp at all IMO....that or you are cutting just too damn low.

Lynden-Jeff
06-24-2006, 07:55 PM
Not to highjack or anything but how can you reduce scalping with a fixed deck?

Cheers
Jeff

Steppenwolf
06-24-2006, 08:19 PM
Not to highjack or anything but how can you reduce scalping with a fixed deck?

Cheers
Jeff
If you scalp a piece of property that means you miss read the area you were cutting,it happens but it should not happen every week.Change your pattern,lift your deck a little. I run 52" fixed decks and don't have any problems to speak of but if I hit a hole I didn't see and scalp,it won't happen again. It's not really hard not to scalp but more of the fact that you are paying attention to what you are doing. Sorta like keeping the chute side of the mower facing away from the mulch beds and cars etc.
Jeff, I thought it was a good question.

quiet
06-24-2006, 09:34 PM
(sigh) More advice from Northern boys about our southern turfgrasses. . . thanks for the help fellas, now go sit down.

True, raising the deck will reduce the scalps, but bermuda varieties. and zoysia need to be cut short. Zoysia gets matted and thatchy, while bermuda gets stemmy, puffy, less dense, less healthy, and REALLY shows a nasty scar when a scalp occurs at higher heights.

Gotta make a decision: have the customer live with the scalps in favor of the overall health, or raise the height and deal with the less healthy turf, or fill in the holes to stop the scalping. A 1" deep hole on bermuda cut at 2" is gonna leave a mark. You simply can't memorize every hole in every lawn, and you can't see a depression that shallow after it grows over again - and customers remind me that it grows over, and is finally gone just before I get back the next week!

The floating deck helps a little, but not as much as you would like. I add spacers to help adjust in 1/8" increments on my 36" TTHP . . . then explain the tradeoffs I gotta make to the customer. Right now I'm cutting at 2 1/8" and that's too high . . .

Steppenwolf
06-24-2006, 09:52 PM
quiet, what I was replying to was Xoo's coment and he is in canada and by raising the deck I ment for him to just push down on his pistol grips, t bar or ecs and raise the deck over the area that he is scalping. You guys down south are dealing with a whole different ball game, so not tying to give advice to you southern boys:-)

Idealtim
06-25-2006, 10:38 AM
I used to try to scalp with my 36 and couldn't. I think your deck is way to low.

quiet
06-25-2006, 10:44 AM
I used to try to scalp with my 36 and couldn't. I think your deck is way to low.

(sigh) . . . more help from up North

poonero
06-25-2006, 10:48 AM
buying a toro is never an upgrade in equipment

topsites
06-25-2006, 10:50 AM
Not to highjack or anything but how can you reduce scalping with a fixed deck?

Cheers
Jeff

Practice, in both cases. ALL wide decks scalp, that is not to say you should accept this as a normal event but it is to say that you need to learn how to prevent it. On maiden cuts you will likely scalp more than ever, it is best to learn what parts of the yard this happens on so one can prevent it the next time around, happen it will, just learn where and how and don't do it again, so to speak.

I have two 48" fixed decks, scalping is rare now, it was a lot more common when I first started with two 52" float decks but it has little to do with that. See, all wide decks scalp, floats just as easy thou the float prevents it some, it isn't like it is completely independent of the rear frame, float only swivels a little bit but beyond that it is up to you.

As for the fixed deck, the front is light enough I find lifting the front over certain parts is the easiest way to prevent it. Other times, angling the entire mower helps but the mower doesn't usually want to angle any other way than the terrain dictates, so lift the deck.
On that note, the angle or direction of approach can make a world of difference, a lot of times simply changing the direction in which you come into that scalp-prone section of the yard fixes the problem. No, I am not saying mow it in the exact opposite direction, I am saying try different directions coming into it (and going out of it as well).

For most parts, watch the ditches, especially the top angle of the ditch but really a lot of times it is easier to weedeat the entire ditch, at least those parts where you can not find a way to not scalp, certainly remembering those sections makes it easier to at least try something different on the next cut.

Last but not least, a little scalp here and there is ok, so long it is not everywhere.

Freddy_Kruger
06-25-2006, 11:10 AM
topsite, why did you go from floating decks to fixed?

topsites
06-25-2006, 11:20 AM
topsite, why did you go from floating decks to fixed?

Truth be known, it was by accidental discovery. I started with two used 52" Wb's and back in my 2nd year I found a 5-year old 48" 15hp Kohler with velke and bagger for a grand, it was such a good deal at the time I had to buy it.

The 48" was in excellent shape, it still had some of that new mower sound (which it has lost by now, hard to describe but it's that jet-engine like sound) and the first couple of weeks I wasn't too happy with it... Went back to the dealer to ask some questions, and they gave me a bunch of hints and tips and pointers specific to the fixed deck, most of all they said it takes about a month of practice to halfway get it, some people never get it but for those who do, the dealer said they never go back.

And he was right, once I 'got it,' I fell in love with it and swore I'd never use a float Wb again. Back in those days, all floats came with a 4-speed tranny while the fixed had 5 forward gears (this has since changed) but among other things, the fixed is 300 pounds compared to the floats 500, which:
- A LOT easier to get unstuck and easier not to get it stuck in the first place.
- When it breaks, I can actually push a fixed deck back on my trailer by hand.
- In the field, the light weight makes it a LOT more fun to use, the ease with which the deck lifts makes this mower one FUN machine to do stunts with, even regular mowing I like much better, it climbs hills like no float ever would.
- Curb jumps are a lot better going, the machine is one solid piece so it never clatters and clanks and no springs and things ever come flying off it coming down a curb even at full speed. Mounting the curb is easier as well.
- It does not play around, there is no game in this mower because it doesn't 'float' around, it is built and handles like a tank.
- As a bonus, it just so happens to cost a thousand less new, thou I like the fixed so much I'd be willing to pay more, this last bit came as a surprise when I bought the '05.
In summary, the fixed deck is lighter, faster, and considerably more accurate.

So it is true:
It does take some time to get used to, and some never get it... But for those of us who do, we never go back.

To me, the fixed deck is to the float deck what a straight razor is to scissors for a barber: Anybody can cut hair with scissors.

Freddy_Kruger
06-25-2006, 12:28 PM
Truth be known, it was by accidental discovery. I started with two used 52" Wb's and back in my 2nd year I found a 5-year old 48" 15hp Kohler with velke and bagger for a grand, it was such a good deal at the time I had to buy it.

The 48" was in excellent shape, it still had some of that new mower sound (which it has lost by now, hard to describe but it's that jet-engine like sound) and the first couple of weeks I wasn't too happy with it... Went back to the dealer to ask some questions, and they gave me a bunch of hints and tips and pointers specific to the fixed deck, most of all they said it takes about a month of practice to halfway get it, some people never get it but for those who do, the dealer said they never go back.

And he was right, once I 'got it,' I fell in love with it and swore I'd never use a float Wb again. Back in those days, all floats came with a 4-speed tranny while the fixed had 5 forward gears (this has since changed) but among other things, the fixed is 300 pounds compared to the floats 500, which:
- A LOT easier to get unstuck and easier not to get it stuck in the first place.
- When it breaks, I can actually push a fixed deck back on my trailer by hand.
- In the field, the light weight makes it a LOT more fun to use, the ease with which the deck lifts makes this mower one FUN machine to do stunts with, even regular mowing I like much better, it climbs hills like no float ever would.
- Curb jumps are a lot better going, the machine is one solid piece so it never clatters and clanks and no springs and things ever come flying off it coming down a curb even at full speed. Mounting the curb is easier as well.
- It does not play around, there is no game in this mower because it doesn't 'float' around, it is built and handles like a tank.
- As a bonus, it just so happens to cost a thousand less new, thou I like the fixed so much I'd be willing to pay more, this last bit came as a surprise when I bought the '05.
In summary, the fixed deck is lighter, faster, and considerably more accurate.

So it is true:
It does take some time to get used to, and some never get it... But for those of us who do, we never go back.

To me, the fixed deck is to the float deck what a straight razor is to scissors for a barber: Anybody can cut hair with scissors.
thanks. Light and cheaper and less problamatic, very good. I assume you recommend hydro eh?

Love your posts btw.:canadaflag:

dcgreenspro
06-25-2006, 02:11 PM
2 things. 1. why aren't you using a reel mower? that would virtually eliminate scalping in your tough areas and give the bermuda/zoysia a way better cut. 2. Get on a top dressing program, extra heavy in the areas you are already scalping.

quiet
06-25-2006, 03:25 PM
2 things. 1. why aren't you using a reel mower? that would virtually eliminate scalping in your tough areas and give the bermuda/zoysia a way better cut. 2. Get on a top dressing program, extra heavy in the areas you are already scalping.

I've thought about it a lot. I just don't think reel mowers are practical for your typical LCO. They're costly to start with, and very expensive to maintain when you're running a commercial maintenance route. Every stick or rock in the lawn can cause nicks or misalignments of the blades or bedknife; imagine a gang reel setup big enough to do a decent sized property efficiently. . . and now you're talking about a big machine to haul around all day.

The Tru-Cuts are what, 20 or 27" wide? That's a lotta work on a 10,000 sf lawn. I recall down in Australia they have a mfr of reel mowers down there that makes 33" (or that neigborhood) wide reel mowers. That gets me thinking . . . until I see the stick and rocks in your typical lawn.

A regular top dressing program is a good suggestion, but getting the average homeowner of a decent sized property to buy into that is another matter.

Dashunde
06-25-2006, 04:10 PM
A floating deck on a small wb is like a tank with a kick-stand. Pointless.

If your about to encounter a spot where you think it is going to scalp, simply push down on the bars to raise the front a little.

Lynden-Jeff
06-25-2006, 07:13 PM
Well I'm using a 32" fixed deck for backyards. I haven't even come close to scalping yet but I thought I would ask to prevent it in the future. Thanks topsites!

Cheers
Jeff

Freddy_Kruger
06-25-2006, 07:25 PM
Xoopiter I just bought a book called Lawns for Canada by Don Williamson, looks very good and lots of pictures. He's a horticulturalist. It has all kinds of info on grasses we have and tips on maintenence. I already learned the difference between kentucky blue grass and creeping fescus (at least I think I did; I'm going to study this book so I can give renovation advice for bad lawns)

K.Carothers
06-25-2006, 11:01 PM
[QUOTE=quiet](sigh) More advice from Northern boys about our southern turfgrasses. . . thanks for the help fellas, now go sit down.QUOTE]


;) ;) ;) ;)

I would love to see you cut what us northern LCO's cut and not scalp.

Northern LCO's are better at handling triple pain in the a** grading everyday -


kc

quiet
06-26-2006, 12:03 AM
[QUOTE=quiet](sigh) More advice from Northern boys about our southern turfgrasses. . . thanks for the help fellas, now go sit down.QUOTE]


;) ;) ;) ;)

I would love to see you cut what us northern LCO's cut and not scalp.

Northern LCO's are better at handling triple pain in the a** grading everyday -


kc

. . . Hunh? I'm in a area called the Hill Country of Texas. New subivisions built on clay and rock. Think all of our properties are graded smooth as a pool table down here? Or is we jes' to stoopid to raze them deks cuz we is too bizzy drinking a beer, hootin' and hollerin' and shootin' at critters while we is mowin' to see them holes?

Most C-4 turfgrasses NEED to mowed a lot shorter than your C-3 grasses. So even small depressions can cause scalping, and you gotta make tradeoffs for appearance vs. overall turf health . . . that was my point.

Your posts are usually informative . . . what WAS your point?

K.Carothers
06-26-2006, 12:07 AM
[QUOTE=K.Carothers]



Your posts are usually informative . . . what WAS your point?


Just busting on ya for the " go and sit down" comment.

It's all good.:waving:


kc

Dashunde
06-26-2006, 12:54 AM
[QUOTE=K.Carothers]

. . . Or is we jes' to stoopid to raze them deks cuz we is too bizzy drinking a beer, hootin' and hollerin' and shootin' at critters while we is mowin' to see them holes?[QUOTE]

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Thats priceless.