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Splicer
06-27-2006, 11:40 PM
Since I am being heckled here for running "Crapman and Ryobi" (said seriously;) ) equipment and therefore I must be a "professional" (said sarcastically:rolleyes: ) and it got me thinking (I know...no good can come from that activity) about my Ryobi and 'Crapman' equipment and just how tough they really are or aren't for use in this field (field meaning lawn care/landscaping field NOT a 'field' like where pastures are)...

The way I see it it all boils down to this: yesterdays residential equipment is todays commercial equipment...meaning that 10 years ago residential equipment was built tougher than todays residential as was the deal with commercial equipment. Therefore the more robustly built residential equip of 10 years ago equates to the approximate build quality of commercial today...

I have taken care of my equipment (the oldest is 17 years old the newest is 8 years) maintaining as required and all of it works equally as well as the same device wearing the commercial brand of today in my honest opinion.

Now I know I can't exactly compare the nimbleness of a Z to my GT...Can't be done...But I can compare the quality of the cut itself, that (to me) being the most important factor of a mower...nimbleness comes in a close second...but the cut itself, again, to me, (actually my customers as well) the cut quality does not suffer one iota...but my Ryobi with all the attachments keeps up with the commercial stuff with ease...in 8 years I haven't even changed the plug...doesn't need it to be changed...Fires 3 rd pull every time without fail when starting 1st time for the day...1st pull the rest of the day...unless its set for awhile and then it is 2 pulls...like friggin clockwork. I use this 1 motor for all these attachments: the blower isn't a 200+MPH version...I think it is 145MPH maximum but thats OK...it does exactly what I need to do...reliably...the edger works well as does the snow thrower for sidewalks and walkways...the straight shaft 18" .095 dual feed trimmer just goes through anything just about and what the string trimmer won't cut, the brush cutter gets easily...and in 8 years know what I have had to fix??? I just yesterday replaced the primer bulb cause the old one split I guess from 8 heavy years of use...thats it...I run the proper fuel mix and no problems in all this time:cool2: .


So what say ye??? Agree or not???:usflag:

ChadsLawn
06-27-2006, 11:50 PM
Back in the day when I originally started.. I had a Homelite trimmer and blower. I was maintaining approx. 60 yards a week.. The trimmer lasted maybe a week. Burnt the clutch in it. The blower on the otherhand lasted a long time.. Reason I went and bought a Shindawia Blower and used the homelite as back-up. But it sat for so long, I couldnt get it started..If the manufacturers find out your using personal use equiptment as Commercial. They will not warranty it when it breaks.

Save some money and buy commercial stuff.. You wont regret it.

oh Disagree with this statement
The way I see it it all boils down to this: yesterdays residential equipment is todays commercial equipment...meaning that 10 years ago residential equipment was built tougher than todays residential as was the deal with commercial equipment. Therefore the more robustly built residential equip of 10 years ago equates to the approximate build quality of commercial today...

Chad

Splicer
06-28-2006, 12:01 AM
So you think that commercial equipment of today is built as robustly as it was 10 years ago???

Scotts' Yard Care
06-28-2006, 12:03 AM
works for you is the way to go:drinkup: From the sound of it some people abuse their equipment so badly that only the heaviest commercial equipment would hold up for them. I knew an older guy who did acreages with a Roper
16hp garden tractor dating to probably the mid 70s or older and it was working great in the late 80s when I saw it. He towed this little tractor behind his pickup by winching the front wheels off the ground and attaching it to the bumper hitch:laugh: Roper built Craftsman for many years though I don't know when they were absorbed by buy outs. I like a commercial Z just because they're so fast and smooth for what we do. We have an 18hp Craftsman tractor that has seen nothing but the worst of conditions doing heavy weed mowing, light grading and rototilling. We have somewhere around 500 hrs on it with very little maintenance. Belts, one spindle and an electric clutch. I washed the tractor for years and very well could have shorted it out one time or another.

gunner27
06-28-2006, 12:07 AM
So you think that commercial equipment of today is built as robustly as it was 10 years ago???
I know this quote was not directed at me, but yes!!!! Some of the same models of trimmers, hedge trimmers, etc. are still available now. If craftsmen works for you, great! BUT, it is not commercial grade. And their is a differance between Craftsmen power equipment and true commercial grade equipment.

Splicer
06-28-2006, 12:29 AM
I know this quote was not directed at me, but yes!!!! Some of the same models of trimmers, hedge trimmers, etc. are still available now. If craftsmen works for you, great! BUT, it is not commercial grade. And their is a differance between Craftsmen power equipment and true commercial grade equipment.
Oh I agree there is a difference...but my Craftsman has the exact same motor that many of your commercial Z's have with heavy duty ground engaging Hydro that I know is tougher than most Z hydros...

My Lawn Boy is technicly classified as a resdential model yet the ONLY differences between the commercial version and the residential is the commercial had/has grease zerk steel wheels and a 1 gallon fuel tank...The engine is the exact same engine, the deck is the exact same deck, and the blade is the exact same blade...Now why would I spend twice the amount for a model that says commercial on the deck when my residential model states it has a "Commercial Engine"??? Where do I save money then? Lawn Boys of today do not feature the same powerful, dependable 2 stroke engines or the cast aluminum staggered wheel deck.

Palmer'sLS
06-28-2006, 12:31 AM
are the lawn-boys a pretty decent mower?...howbout the cut? thanks

Splicer
06-28-2006, 12:37 AM
are the lawn-boys a pretty decent mower?...howbout the cut? thanks
I highly recommend Lawn Boy...Here is my LB and a yard he had just cut:

mulcahy mowing
06-28-2006, 12:43 AM
i have a "crapsmen" tractor. I don't cut with it it has a blade on it for landscape jobs and lawn repairs. it's a monster when i comes to pushing and when your plowing anything dirt snow leaf piles.. it dose it all.

LALawnboy
06-28-2006, 12:52 AM
i've got to second that on lawnboys...i have an older silverpro that i've used for a while and just bought an 06 commercial lawnboy. the thing i like the best about the commercial vs. the silverpro are as follows: 3 speed transmission (even in 2nd gear it seems to go faster than the silverpro), the 1 gallon fuel tank is definitely a plus, just last weekend, i did 13 yards on one full tank and it still has gas in it. time is money, so not having to stop and refill the mower every so often definitely helps. i've always loved the lawnboy 2 cycles. however, the new commercial came with a 4 cycle briggs and i honestly can't find anything bad about it. the engine is definitely quieter than the duraforce and can power through a lot heavier stuff. on top of that, when i was looking into getting the commercial lawnboy, i also looked at the toros (which were about 500-600 more) and the main complaint i had about them was no side discharge, it had to be purchased seperately. when the yard allows me to, i like to side discharge, and the lawnboy allows me to do just that. plus, it can mulch and bag as well, so i think i made out great with this new lawnboy. on top of that, who can beat the lawnboy green? lol

todd

mslawn
06-28-2006, 06:35 PM
If you been running homeowner ryobi for 8 years, you must not cut many lawns. We can only get about 1 to 1-1/2 years out of a commercial grade trimmer.

newz7151
06-28-2006, 07:28 PM
who can beat the lawnboy green? lol

todd

Geez.. and that Pink fuel tank and wheels? It's nice to see that Toro kept the old style deck on the commercial Lawnboys and didn't scrap em out like they did on the new Lawnboy residential units.

Dashunde
06-28-2006, 08:17 PM
I dunno... I lean towards disagree. Commercial stuff is about the same as it was 10 years ago, maybe even 15.
Grasshoppers appear to be almost the exact same as they were in the early 90's.

Then, on the other hand, I've got a 1967 WheelHorse Hydro(!!!) tractor that is very solid and it's Kohler (all cast iron) is still running strong.
It has a stamped deck with nary a crack, and I swear the cut is unbelievable.
My Grandpa has had it since I was a little kid (age 6'ish).
He mowed two acres with it every week during the St. Louis growing season and plowed his long driveway after snows for around 30 years, plus the 6-8 years it had on it (doing who knows what) before he bought it.
It also pulled around a trailer filled with firewood during the winters.

During that time he probably put a piston and rings in it, maybe a few spindles, and if there was not a zerk on a pivot point he put one there.
You gotta watch where you touch the thing as it will get you greasy real quick. ;)

He finally sold his house and property at age 86 and moved into a nice, no maintenance condo a few months ago and thats how I ended up with it.

Just goes to show that if you take really good care of solidly built old stuff it will last almost forever.
Can you get 40 years out of a new Toro tractor? I kinda doubt it... well, maybe Gramps could. :laugh:

WJW Lawn
06-28-2006, 08:40 PM
All I know is I bought a John Deere JS40....for trim work...it lasted 2 weeks then it broke. Took it back today. There is a difference in residential and commercial IMO.

LALawnboy
06-29-2006, 02:37 AM
Geez.. and that Pink fuel tank and wheels? It's nice to see that Toro kept the old style deck on the commercial Lawnboys and didn't scrap em out like they did on the new Lawnboy residential units.

i'm guessing you're being sarcastic because the wheels and fuel tank are actually orange. and i have to agree with you on toro keeping the traditional lawnboy deck. i've used a staggered wheel deck my whole life (dad has always owned lawnboys) and i just find so many advantages of having it. true, you can only trim on one side (the left) but it just seems so much easier after using many different models. as for the lawnboys new residential models, they looke like crap....and look very cheaply made. they're definitely running down the traditional lawnboy name. hell, my dad's first lawnboy he bought back in the early 80's ran for nearly 15 years before he got rid of it. and the only reason he got a new one was because he wanted a self propel model.

WJW Lawn
06-29-2006, 07:33 AM
You guys are gonna think this is funny...but i have an MTD Yard Machine-21-push. That little sucker is the most reliable 21 I OWN! When my Lawn Boy blew up....I pulled out the MTD....when the John Deere lasted for 2 weeks...Pulled out the MTD. Its been in service for 7 years...and Ive only had to replace the starter dog on it. I dont know if I bought the most well built MTD with a Briggs in the history of the company....but all I know is I paid 250 for it, and Im constantly amazed with how this supposed-to-be-POS still runs and runs.

Idealtim
06-29-2006, 09:38 AM
What ever floats your boat. if you can get your money out of crapsman stuff, go ahead, good for you. If you can get away with cheaper equipment it reduces your overhead and increases your profit margins. I definately dont see the quality in homeowner stuff, it's just not there. It may be fine for some but I need the heavy duty decks, drive train, and frames.

newz7151
06-29-2006, 09:49 AM
i'm guessing you're being sarcastic because the wheels and fuel tank are actually orange.

All I have to go by is the picture on the LB website. http://www.lawnboy.com/productinfo/mowers/commercial/index.html
Looks pink to me ?

Sandgropher
06-29-2006, 10:57 AM
When i first was involved in the industry(15 years ago) the 1st trimmer i got was a Ryobi it would go all day on big block clearing jobs(didnt like the bump feed) and would be the one i relide on when things were tough it outlasted a sthil and husky, so when it died i got another the same model ,didnt last five minutes, i think they put superior parts in the early home owner stuff to get a good rep, then put cheap materials in later to save money,anyway my top 3 trimmers Ryobi,Shindy 27 and kawa kbl in my 8 and a bit years in lawn care.

i still laugh some times when i think about it, it was known as cheapo stuff even then but that one was a ripper.:)

Lynden-Jeff
06-29-2006, 10:59 AM
I think the only good thing about a lawnboy is a honda engine! I woulden't touch a briggs powered lawnboy.

Jeff

daveintoledo
06-29-2006, 05:58 PM
you have very little real experience in this industry....:dizzy:

lawnmaniac883
06-29-2006, 06:45 PM
You cannot even compare the differences between residential and commercial equipment for there are too many. That said if you can ever afford a piece of commercial equipment then buy it and see the difference for yourself. The biggest distinguishable factor that I can think of is ease of servicing. Almost all residential products have numerous plastic guards and JUNK in the way of grease zerks, spindles, and mainly the engine whereas commercial products aim towards ease of service by putting HOLES where you need to get through to something, etc.

Lugnut
06-29-2006, 08:25 PM
Thats a great point about the ease of service...even once you get the damn plastic guard off and service the mower you're probably going to have a helluva time putting the plastic back on...what ever happened to good old nuts and bolts? As for the lawnboys the design either makes you love them or hate them...personally i hate them bacause the right front corner of the deck will constantly bottom out when mowing slopes of any significant degree...and isn't that why most of us have 21 inch mowers? to get places where we don't want to take our ztrs and walkbehinds ex. steep slopes

WJW Lawn
06-30-2006, 07:35 AM
Residential sucks! It simply is too much of a pain in the butt to keep those things running. For me...it's worth the extra cash to only get commercial. Except for that MTD 21" Yard Machine....Strapped a grenade to it last night...still runs!! lol

Envy Lawn Service
06-30-2006, 05:54 PM
Well, I gotta say, and everyone has to admit....
Most RESIDENTIAL stuff just ain't built tuff like it used to be.
Most of it falls under the 'cheap & disposable' category these days.

Ryobi for example had an excellent split-boom trimmer years ago. I had one and several attachments. It did all my commercial use trimming and edging, as well as several other odd tasks with other attachments. It lasted me through several years of commercial service, which is saying a lot coming from me, because the little unit logged more hours per day than my mowers. Never had but one small problem with it up until the day it died.

It needed a $9 gasket kit that no one had in stock and it was going to take weeks to get. I couldn't wait weeks. So I bought Stihl stuff to replace it. Love the Stihl stuff, but the Ryobi is still sorely missed because of the straight shaft trimmer with clockwise rotating head, and the attachments.

Today, I doubt a new Ryobi would last me a week.
They are just not made with the same quality anymore.

Anyways, if you have some quality residential stuff you are happy with and you still intend on staying a one-man or two-man operation, where you are operating the equipment or very closely supervising it's use... well then I don't see a problem with sticking with what you have.

The crappy part is that once the Ryobi goes, you'll be like me. You'll have to convert to a commercial handheld and you'll have to attempt to get used to the backwards spinning heads. When the Craftsman goes, you'll have to move over to a high-end Simplicity, Cub, or John Deere to replace it with anything close if you do not move to commercial mowers too.

Flex-Deck
06-30-2006, 07:51 PM
Since I am being heckled here for running "Crapman and Ryobi" (said seriously;) ) equipment and therefore I must be a "professional" (said sarcastically:rolleyes: ) and it got me thinking (I know...no good can come from that activity) about my Ryobi and 'Crapman' equipment and just how tough they really are or aren't for use in this field (field meaning lawn care/landscaping field NOT a 'field' like where pastures are)...

The way I see it it all boils down to this: yesterdays residential equipment is todays commercial equipment...meaning that 10 years ago residential equipment was built tougher than todays residential as was the deal with commercial equipment. Therefore the more robustly built residential equip of 10 years ago equates to the approximate build quality of commercial today...

I have taken care of my equipment (the oldest is 17 years old the newest is 8 years) maintaining as required and all of it works equally as well as the same device wearing the commercial brand of today in my honest opinion.

Now I know I can't exactly compare the nimbleness of a Z to my GT...Can't be done...But I can compare the quality of the cut itself, that (to me) being the most important factor of a mower...nimbleness comes in a close second...but the cut itself, again, to me, (actually my customers as well) the cut quality does not suffer one iota...but my Ryobi with all the attachments keeps up with the commercial stuff with ease...in 8 years I haven't even changed the plug...doesn't need it to be changed...Fires 3 rd pull every time without fail when starting 1st time for the day...1st pull the rest of the day...unless its set for awhile and then it is 2 pulls...like friggin clockwork. I use this 1 motor for all these attachments: the blower isn't a 200+MPH version...I think it is 145MPH maximum but thats OK...it does exactly what I need to do...reliably...the edger works well as does the snow thrower for sidewalks and walkways...the straight shaft 18" .095 dual feed trimmer just goes through anything just about and what the string trimmer won't cut, the brush cutter gets easily...and in 8 years know what I have had to fix??? I just yesterday replaced the primer bulb cause the old one split I guess from 8 heavy years of use...thats it...I run the proper fuel mix and no problems in all this time:cool2: .


So what say ye??? Agree or not???:usflag:

I have said over and over - Any mower with sharp blades and a level deck will mow well, and the biggest most expensive mower in the world with dull blades and an unlevel deck will mow like crap.

Lawnmedics
07-10-2006, 11:35 PM
I bought a handheld Homelite blower/vac at a store because it was on sale. I figured it would be good as a backup to my echo backpack blowers. I expanded to another truck and it has been in pretty much constant use for two years with no problems. My helper loves it and is pretty quick with it. The tube is taped into position and still sucks up leaves well. I still buy only comercial equipment and will replace it when it dies with commercial equipment. Maybe it is a freak of nature but it has gone against everything I believe in.

MTR
07-11-2006, 02:42 AM
Is this post all nostalgic about the beginning of your all business?
You guys, talk like back in the days...and such...woow.
Ryobi....so excited....:clapping:

Lumberjack
07-11-2006, 09:54 AM
The quality of both residential and commercial equipment has fallen so yes in many cases the residential equipment of old was built as good as some commercial units today.

At best most residential equipment if babied can be a short term stepping stone to better stuff but in the long run the commercial grade stuff will ususally out last it.

jkingrph
07-11-2006, 01:01 PM
I am homeowner, and long ago learned that most of the "homeowner" equipment, power tools are too expensive in the long run. I will only buy commercial grade. You get what you pay for!!!

PowerEquipmentWarehouse
07-11-2006, 01:01 PM
A lot of our customers started out with residential units due to the heavier price of commercial machines. Most guys who went to the next level (professionally) replaced their homeowner stuff with commercial units as they could afford it. The weekend cutters and "after-work" guys mostly stay with the residential equipment. I echo the sentiment of most people, keep the blade sharp, the deck level and perform regular maintenance. Most residential or pro equipment will perform well. The commercial stuff just seems to last a lot longer....Mike

MOW ED
07-11-2006, 04:44 PM
Some people are going to have luck with homeowner stuff. If you are making money, are happy with the time you have to spend and your customers are happy with residential stuff then who am I to say buy commercial.
My expeience has been different but that is me. I basically demolished a Toro lawn tractor in 8 months. My Craftsman mower did cut grass but it cut it too slow. My hand held Singer blower was OK until I got into leaf season then I was sunk and I was not too fond of the homeowner rake. In my case if I continued to use homeowner grade equipment I would be out of business.

Yes some of the older equipment was built solid. It was all they knew. Find an old Case tractor or the like. But then again some of that stuff was dangerous too. Open belts or shafts, no safety interlock seats. Quality of cut was nonexistant. It was just made to cut and they did. I commend you for making things work, I must admit that I can't do it that way.

I did once think of a gimmick type lawn service, just picture this. Mow with an old push reel mower, trim with the hand snippers and edge with the rubber wheeled star cutter, when finished use a push broom and sweep it clean. Now thats nostalgic but thats how I started about 40 years ago. :clapping:

tallimeca
07-11-2006, 06:39 PM
If you are a commercial cutter, don't buy consumer equipment and expect a full warranty. Not even if you register it under your personal name. The dealer reserves the right to squeal on you.

If you come in and buy a White Outdoor (MTD manufactured) tractor for landscaping use, and file it under your name, and the spindles are hanging out of it after 3 months because you've already exceeded the hours that any homeowner would put on it in it's lifetime.....it will be obvious.

The advantage to buying commercial equipment is simple.

1) It's designed to handle the hours and some minor abuse (hahahaha) with the everyday hard work it sees, where is a home owner trimmer is not. It's all about down time. If you aren't using it, your not making money. That's the whole point isn't it?

2)Performance. Many home owner lines just won't cut the mustard in the field for some of the jobs you face. Plain and simple.

3) Warranty. Home owner lines sometimes carry no warranty, or shortened warranty (90 days, maybe only 1 year) for commercial use.

Quick scenario. We are a fairly large Echo dealer.

Now, Echo obviously subs some "Home Owner" rated models to Home Depot. Husky does the same thing with Lowes and Sears.

PB200 hand blowers, $159. SRM2100 Straight shaft trimmer $199. CS305 chain saw $199. These are examples of some units that are commercially designed, but still sold more to homeowners.

These carry a 2 year home owner warranty, 1 year commercial. 90 day if you were renting it.

Now, the PB200 blower is great for blowing off grass clippings, and small debris, but that's about it. For $199, you can go with the PB230LN, which has more power, quieter, and padded, anti vibe handle, and protected gas tank. Still carries a 1 year warranty, but much nicer unit. You can buy a SRM260S trimmer at $319.99. WAY more power. Solid steel drive shaft, rather than flex shaft. Still 1 year commercial warranty, but well worth the money. You can buy a CS370 saw for $259. Way more power and bigger bar. Rated Light duty commercial, but still a far jump.

Now, you can go buy a Homelite or Poulan hand held blower for 129 bucks. Horizontal fan, so it twists your arm back and forth, and you have to disassemble the whole unit to change the rope. For what.......$30?? Then try to find someone to work on it.

Same goes for the other equipment. The price difference is minimal in the long run when you factor everything in.

Poulan or homelite saw. Has a 20 inch bar!!!! But the muffler falls off and melts the housing, the clutch burnt out after about 15 hours use, and it only runs and half choke. But you saved $40 bucks and got a 2 inch longer bar!!!

Dont' add up.

REALSLOW
07-11-2006, 06:49 PM
If you are a commercial cutter, don't buy consumer equipment and expect a full warranty. Not even if you register it under your personal name. The dealer reserves the right to squeal on you.

If you come in and buy a White Outdoor (MTD manufactured) tractor for landscaping use, and file it under your name, and the spindles are hanging out of it after 3 months because you've already exceeded the hours that any homeowner would put on it in it's lifetime.....it will be obvious.

The advantage to buying commercial equipment is simple.

1) It's designed to handle the hours and some minor abuse (hahahaha) with the everyday hard work it sees, where is a home owner trimmer is not. It's all about down time. If you aren't using it, your not making money. That's the whole point isn't it?

2)Performance. Many home owner lines just won't cut the mustard in the field for some of the jobs you face. Plain and simple.

3) Warranty. Home owner lines sometimes carry no warranty, or shortened warranty (90 days, maybe only 1 year) for commercial use.

Quick scenario. We are a fairly large Echo dealer.

Now, Echo obviously subs some "Home Owner" rated models to Home Depot. Husky does the same thing with Lowes and Sears.

PB200 hand blowers, $159. SRM2100 Straight shaft trimmer $199. CS305 chain saw $199. These are examples of some units that are commercially designed, but still sold more to homeowners.

These carry a 2 year home owner warranty, 1 year commercial. 90 day if you were renting it.

Now, the PB200 blower is great for blowing off grass clippings, and small debris, but that's about it. For $199, you can go with the PB230LN, which has more power, quieter, and padded, anti vibe handle, and protected gas tank. Still carries a 1 year warranty, but much nicer unit. You can buy a SRM260S trimmer at $319.99. WAY more power. Solid steel drive shaft, rather than flex shaft. Still 1 year commercial warranty, but well worth the money. You can buy a CS370 saw for $259. Way more power and bigger bar. Rated Light duty commercial, but still a far jump.

Now, you can go buy a Homelite or Poulan hand held blower for 129 bucks. Horizontal fan, so it twists your arm back and forth, and you have to disassemble the whole unit to change the rope. For what.......$30?? Then try to find someone to work on it.

Same goes for the other equipment. The price difference is minimal in the long run when you factor everything in.

Poulan or homelite saw. Has a 20 inch bar!!!! But the muffler falls off and melts the housing, the clutch burnt out after about 15 hours use, and it only runs and half choke. But you saved $40 bucks and got a 2 inch longer bar!!!

Dont' add up. What are you talking about?, Echo is homeowner stuff.

Envy Lawn Service
07-11-2006, 10:29 PM
I am homeowner, and long ago learned that most of the "homeowner" equipment, power tools are too expensive in the long run. I will only buy commercial grade. You get what you pay for!!!

Yup... that's the truth.

Using commercial stuff is usually cheaper in the long run and saves me money.
I just have to keep it more than a year.

jkingrph
07-11-2006, 11:52 PM
Yup... that's the truth.

Using commercial stuff is usually cheaper in the long run and saves me money.
I just have to keep it more than a year.

Yes, Keep mine more than a year, Stihl chainsaw and handheld blowers about 15 years old and two string trimmers not quite so old still going strong, Keep them clean and drain old fuel when not using often. My new Scag will probably be the last mower I buy, Am planning on 20-25 years service from it.

Jeff

sweatyclippingcoveredguy
07-12-2006, 09:46 AM
I do know one thing is for certain when it comes to old vs. new machinery.

The developers change things around unneccessarily to either.

a. make a part wear out or break faster
b. make it harder to actually fix a specific thing yourself when it breaks

Nowadays, it's all about making the money. While the cutting quality may be better than before, the engineers who make this stuff are using that to lure people in to buy it, meanwhile the company feeds itself and the dealers more from parts and servicing. Just like new cars.

MTR
07-12-2006, 01:23 PM
If you use Ryobi or homelite stuff in # 4 of top5 ranking gated communities in my city, you will be laughed at like never felt before. All of Mexicans and Haitians crew use strictly Redmax & Stihl for all stuff on the green and large common areas...they do bushes all day, I mean all day, now you go in with homeowner stuff, I think you might make a fool of yourself, in addition to heaven sake.. that cable in trimmer snapped!!:dancing:

Willofalltrades
07-12-2006, 05:12 PM
I started with a Craftsman handheld blower. It lasted one year of light comercial activity. Then the first big spring cleanup of the year it took a poo on me. I am now running a redmax 8000 and love it.

I know the reliability is a big factor but lets look at the profitability to. Commercial equipment just gets the job done faster with, most of the time, a better cut than today's residential. I can tell who has their lawn maintained by commercial cutter and homeowners. I love it when a homeowner's deck isn't level. Its funny to see how bad they messed their lawn. lol

jkingrph
07-12-2006, 06:47 PM
I started with a Craftsman handheld blower. It lasted one year of light comercial activity. Then the first big spring cleanup of the year it took a poo on me. I am now running a redmax 8000 and love it.

I know the reliability is a big factor but lets look at the profitability to. Commercial equipment just gets the job done faster with, most of the time, a better cut than today's residential. I can tell who has their lawn maintained by commercial cutter and homeowners. I love it when a homeowner's deck isn't level. Its funny to see how bad they messed their lawn. lol
Please don't knock homeowners so bad. Some of us started off in places where there was not much in the way of commercial services, living in a development several miles out of a small town. Had to learn to do things the right way to look right, and also learned the hard lessons of cheap vs good equipment to work with.

sweatyclippingcoveredguy
07-13-2006, 11:25 AM
I started with a Craftsman handheld blower. It lasted one year of light comercial activity. Then the first big spring cleanup of the year it took a poo on me. I am now running a redmax 8000 and love it.

I know the reliability is a big factor but lets look at the profitability to. Commercial equipment just gets the job done faster with, most of the time, a better cut than today's residential. I can tell who has their lawn maintained by commercial cutter and homeowners. I love it when a homeowner's deck isn't level. Its funny to see how bad they messed their lawn. lol


Did you forget to add fuel stabilizer in the winter?

Splicer
07-13-2006, 02:07 PM
Commercial equipment just gets the job done faster with, most of the time, a better cut than today's residential.

Exactly my point...Now compare TODAYS comm equip to YESTERDAYS residential equip...I say that yesteryears residential equipment is equivalent to todays commercial equip...Yes they made cheap residential equip back then but it was not the norm...

Willofalltrades
07-13-2006, 04:24 PM
Did you forget to add fuel stabilizer in the winter?

I did not add fuel stabilizer to it. My echo is 4 years old and has never had it either, that runs great. It blew the rings while I was on the job.

Willofalltrades
07-13-2006, 04:35 PM
Exactly my point...Now compare TODAYS comm equip to YESTERDAYS residential equip...I say that yesteryears residential equipment is equivalent to todays commercial equip...Yes they made cheap residential equip back then but it was not the norm...

My parent's IH Cub will never die! You have a good point. The quality of some of the residential equipment from the '80s and very early '90s is incredible.

BBN
08-17-2006, 05:35 PM
jumping in late in this one but I bought a Murray residential lan mower back in 1984 as a kid and did about 10-12 lawns a week for 7 years with the same mower and never had a problem with it.