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teejet
07-01-2006, 11:00 PM
what is the best way to install a retaining wall using "J-blocks". The company literatue says to dig down 6in. and put down 1in. of granular fill then compact that using compacter. Also compact behind the wall one course at a time with 12'' wide bed of granular fill. The place that sells the stones recommeds using pea gravel base and backfill with pea gravel or small gravel. also use leach pipe. The wall supports a hill that is lawn 40ft. from top of hill to wall and drops about 6ft. The wall will be 6 courses high or 32 in tall, and 40 ft. long. Soil is clay but not heavy. Has any one used these small ''J-blocks" they are everywhere around here.

Dirty Water
07-01-2006, 11:08 PM
In WA you need to have a engineer design any wall over 4', or build 4' walls with set backs.

I would not use a block like you are describing to hold back 6' of earth.

Use something like Versa-lock with proper drainage installed on the reverse side and geo grid installation.

Mike33
07-01-2006, 11:29 PM
I think you are staring off wrong from the get go. Your footer with little stone , clay , and the block does not sound impressive. Do your homework and dont get bit.
Mike

Squizzy246B
07-02-2006, 12:00 AM
I don't know J block here but I would be compacting 4" of clean sand and 4" to 6" of road base or crushed fines, granite (we use recycled,crushed concrete or bricks fines a lot) for the footing. It may only be a 32" wall but there is some surcharge and its a large catchment area..water will travel horizontally in clay and the correct drainage will be important.

teejet
07-02-2006, 01:54 PM
What is the purpose in having a footing that deep. Is it for extra drainage or to keep the wall from settling. Maybe it is for water to drain out from under the wall. I mean why do a bunch of extra digging for nothing. Also why compact the fill behind a wall.:confused:

Mike33
07-02-2006, 10:37 PM
What is the purpose in having a footing that deep. Is it for extra drainage or to keep the wall from settling. Maybe it is for water to drain out from under the wall. I mean why do a bunch of extra digging for nothing. Also why compact the fill behind a wall.:confused:
Again many of my post read " all based on location ". I like a descent footer in my area we have clay or shale. I like to get down to something solid. Also that footer is working for drainage also the purpose of srw is proper drainage. I never build a wall on less than 12" of gravel. Yes i compact my back fill 1 reason that is my manuf. says also when i lay my grid it will stay where it belongs instead of a big sag from settling. Also you give a finish product when you leave and not have to return to fix low spots. All of my walls get some kind of landscaping behind them.
Mike
www,bobcatservice33.com

Squizzy246B
07-03-2006, 05:46 AM
Also why compact the fill behind a wall.:confused:

Mike has covered most of it but essentially if you are not going to compact the backfill area don't bother with the grid. Put quite simply, compacting the toe and the backfill strenthens the wall...by a HUGE amount. It makes the wall act as one interlocked unit..altogether stronger. You should talk to an engineer with lots of SRW experience and understand the fundamentals of the structure you are building. Thats what I did it helped a lot..that and some forums like this one.:drinkup:

Mike33
07-03-2006, 07:29 AM
Mike has covered most of it but essentially if you are not going to compact the backfill area don't bother with the grid. Put quite simply, compacting the toe and the backfill strenthens the wall...by a HUGE amount. It makes the wall act as one interlocked unit..altogether stronger. You should talk to an engineer with lots of SRW experience and understand the fundamentals of the structure you are building. Thats what I did it helped a lot..that and some forums like this one.:drinkup:
Thanks, i guess we build them the same from the outback to the colonies good to know.
Mike:weightlifter:

teejet
07-05-2006, 11:06 PM
thanks for the info guys.:waving: