PDA

View Full Version : Over Fert 1,000 sq ft patch with 14,700 sq ft of fert


T.Wells
07-04-2006, 12:01 AM
Hello-

Well I made a mistake today while spreading some Mach 2 with 24-0-11 included. My spreader control opened up all the way and I didn't take notice very quickly. :nono:

Well, to make a long story short, I basically dumped a bag set to cover almost 15,000 sq feet on about 1000 sq ft of grass. :dizzy:

I need some help here. Will my lawn (straight stripe of the side of my property) dye out here? It will look really bad in this specific area so I ran the sprinklers for 30 minutes today in the affected area. Is there something else I should do? Maybe run them some more?

Thanks,
T.Wells

i_plant_art
07-04-2006, 12:05 AM
wait a few days and then run them (the sprinklers) some more so that the grass wont be in shock as much when it uptakes the fert. id water frequently for long periods of time like at least an hour at a time 2x a day every 3 days........ its wont be that bad i used a 50lb bag of urea on my front and back yard (1/4 acre) and then about a week later used an entire 50lbs bag on the back itself..... needs less to say its think as anything and green too but before it was thin and about 60% dirt and weed. ...... youll be ok just keep the water on it...

jeffinsgf
07-04-2006, 11:50 AM
This is a non-professional opinion, but I would lay the water to that area and not stop. 15 times the normal application is going to burn up that area if you don't leach it out, now. I would water it until the water was running off, and then I would water it some more.

topsites
07-05-2006, 02:22 AM
This is a non-professional opinion, but I would lay the water to that area and not stop. 15 times the normal application is going to burn up that area if you don't leach it out, now. I would water it until the water was running off, and then I would water it some more.

Yup, and when that's done, throw down a 40-lb. bag of lime on Wide-open in the same area and then do the water bit again.

T.Wells
07-05-2006, 12:17 PM
Well, between me and mother nature, there has been a good amount of water given to the area. I used my irrigation system to lay down water for 2-hours over the last day and last night we received some good rain showers (1.5 inches).

I'll have to go get a bag of lime and proceed as directed.

Thanks!

T.Wells

upidstay
07-05-2006, 01:50 PM
Umm, well in my professional opinion, your lawn is toast. You applied 15 times the recomended amount of fertilizer. That is a huge oops. Not to mention the environmental damage of all of that insecticide and nitrates leaching into the groundwater. Nature can filter out small amouints, but not that much. Pay attention to what you are doing. This stuff is safe when used properly. That means confirming spreader settings before you start. Better yet, hire a professional. And pray the area you did wasn't over your well.

T.Wells
07-05-2006, 02:55 PM
Pay attention to what you are doing. This stuff is safe when used properly. That means confirming spreader settings before you start. Better yet, hire a professional. And pray the area you did wasn't over your well.

The spreader was set properly and but the nut came loose during the application process. It was a mistake and I am here owning up to my own error and doing my best to take corrective action which is more than most would do.

We don't have well water here so no worries there but thanks for pointing that out as it could have been an area which I overlooked.

Considering that my lawn in this area may very well be toast, how long would until I start to see the effects. I imagine that browning would be the first glimpse of the mistake.

Thanks again for all the valuable information in the thread.

-T.Wells

mbricker
07-06-2006, 03:54 AM
Either the grass is burned out for the season, or DON'T STAND TOO CLOSE TO IT, it may knock you down as it shoots up.

T.Wells
07-06-2006, 10:29 PM
Either the grass is burned out for the season, or DON'T STAND TOO CLOSE TO IT, it may knock you down as it shoots up.

hehe, good one.

I am starting to wonder if my mistake was not as bad as I initially anticipated. My spreader (Earthway 2170) had only 30 setting on the handle. It was set to 14 per the bag but as I indicated the bolt came loose (under tightened by me) and I started spreading at 30 instead of 14.

Now if the number are incrementally higher, i.e. a setting at 28 is double rate coverage, maybe I won't come out so bad in the end.

-T.Wells

lawnmaniac883
07-07-2006, 12:34 AM
So you put what a 50lb bag on 1000sqft of grass?? WOW. If it doesnt die out take some pictures of your new rainforest.

T.Wells
07-07-2006, 08:56 AM
So you put what a 50lb bag on 1000sqft of grass?? WOW. If it doesnt die out take some pictures of your new rainforest.

Well, at first I thought I had but read my post above. I think it was a little better than that but still, it certainly was terribly wrong. :nono:

TurfProSTL
07-08-2006, 01:32 AM
You put 10-12 lbs of nitrogen (2 years worth) on that 1000 sqft, depending on if it was a 40 or 50 lb bag. I think it's going to be toast. Either from fert burn or fungus disease.

Don't know that lime would help at all, but gypsum might help with the salt buildup. It seems to help with dog urine burns.

I think you have some renovation work in your future this fall.....

T.Wells
07-26-2006, 03:45 PM
Well, I wanted to update everyone on my problem. It has been a little over 3 weeks and the lawn has not given up. It certainly is very green and growing faster in the affected area but it has not browned out yet.

How long do you all think it will take for the grass to die?

T.Wells

TurfProSTL
07-26-2006, 04:39 PM
If it hasn't burned yet, it probably won't.....

you must be pouring the water to it. Good job.

hmartin
07-26-2006, 06:52 PM
You must have been dreaming about the 2006 Calendar girls to have dumped a bag 16 times faster than normal and not noticed it.:sleeping: :sleeping:

Gatewayuser
07-31-2006, 11:27 PM
It won't burn don't worry. Things happen it was not your fault you did not know your spreader was falling apart.
Do what topsite said about the lime it will help control the damage from the sulfur in the fertilizer by bringing it back down to the proper pH. Also try to get the smallest granular pelli lime possible so it will break down and work faster.
Good luck!
P.S. if you ever go with a professional, Chem Lawn does NOT fall under that category. Hope I don't get in trouble for saying that!

Critical Care
08-01-2006, 12:46 AM
I think that everyone has had boo boos at one time or another. You’re a bit lucky in that there is only 1.93% of ammonia nitrate in Mach 2, which in higher amounts could have spelled disaster for you. The rest of the nitrogen, 22.97%, is sulfur coated urea. Urea has high burn potential, however the sulfur coated urea has low burn potential.

The pesticide active ingredient is slightly toxic – moderately toxic to aquatic animals. Unfortunately, whenever you overwater turf, you generally get runoff. And wherever that runoff goes, so does the pesticide. Tough situation.

T.Wells
08-01-2006, 11:31 AM
Hello-

Thanks for all the support and kind words folks. I am really happy that the yard did not burn in this area and do feel bad about the excess pesticide. This chunk of the yard is much greener than the rest but right now, that is much better than the reverse.

Is there something specific I should do for this area on my next fert application (other than not make the mistake of having too much fall from the spreader). I plan on aerating the yard (it is only 1-year old turf, new home) and overseeding with a fescue/rye/bluegrass blend (Teammates Plus is what I have been using).

Thanks again,
T.Wells

TurfProSTL
08-01-2006, 07:15 PM
Skip that area.....

Critical Care
08-02-2006, 11:42 PM
Nitrogen naturally leaches through soil. The low percentage of ammonium nitrate, used for greening up your lawn in a hurry, will leach through the soil fairly rapidly. However the synthetic sulfur coated urea leaches slowly. How fast, how soon, when to fertilize next, are questions dependent upon a number of factors… such as the amount of irrigation being used, and the type of soil.

I’d be tempted just to keep an eye on that area, and in a month if it begins to show signs of yellowing, then perhaps consider an organic fertilizer. The organic fertilizer will have less nitrogen, but should offer a longer residual effect. And then, later on in the fall, get an “autumn fertilizer” with a higher percentage of potassium while maintaining a lower percentage of nitrogen.

Your new lawn shouldn’t have much of a thatch layer, but dumping on nitrogen will surely speed that process up.