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DJ Contracting
07-05-2006, 04:09 PM
I have an employee age 40 that continues to make mistakes that in turn cost me money for example weedeating with very short strings :hammerhead: can't keep a straight line when mowing :hammerhead: does not know when to mulch or discharge, :hammerhead: till I tell him and today he was cutting for 1/2 hr before I noticed that he had not put the deck down :hammerhead: should I dock his pay for every time he cost me money. I should have never hired someone I know.

rodfather
07-05-2006, 04:14 PM
IMO replace him immediately

imograss
07-05-2006, 04:48 PM
Let him know about his frequent mistakes in a professional way. Make him understand how these things affect the overall performance of the business. Let him know that in the time it takes you to go behind and correct his mistakes, you could have done it yourself in the first place. If he continues to be careless, sever your business relationship with him. Just my .02

tacoma200
07-05-2006, 04:48 PM
Well your right you should never hire a friend or someone you know. What's his attitude like? If you worked harder with him is there a chance he would improve? I also work at a large factory and this is a very common thing. Some workers catch on fast and others seem to take forever. But some of the slower ones turn out better in the long run if you work with them and they have a good attitude. Being there on time and not missing days are a much bigger poblem. You know him better than us. Is he worth the extra training time, will he listen to instruction, I mean if he is on time every day and is trying that may make a difference. We would not have very many employees at our factory if we canned them without going the extra mile to try to help them learn the new job. The first 6 month is considered a loss on most new manufacturing jobs, its just the cost of doing business. I know mowing is simpler but you have to make the call.

gmenvirolawns
07-05-2006, 05:15 PM
Friends don't make you money. I have fired friends before its not fun, but when they get in the way of my money they are GONE
FIRE HIM

topsites
07-05-2006, 05:40 PM
Friends don't make you money. I have fired friends before its not fun, but when they get in the way of my money they are GONE
FIRE HIM

yup... they're right, never work with or for friends, relatives, or neighbors.

They test me, we get together and ask me if I can do whatever and I tell them the rule is never work for friends / relatives and ohhhh they cry and whine until I give in... Like today I showed up at a relative's to do something that should've taken 10-15 minutes, I wasn't even sure what to charge it was so mickey mouse... But it was easy work and with the dreary cloudy skies looking like they might drown the earth anytime, I thought this was a good day to do mickey mouse stuff... Well wouldn't you know it, I get 5 minutes into it and here they come with their own tools and motion around to get me to stop while they start working behind me and in front of me and start digging around and crap...
I says to them: Are you going to let me finish this?
And I got back to things and 2-3 minutes later they're at it again with the 'helping hand' nonsense.
So about 10 or so minutes into it, I figured I can't deal with this...
Without saying another word and just calm and nice as can be, I grabbed my 2-cyclers that I was using at the time, walked to the truck, put the stuff in the back, got in, started the engine and drove off.

Rules are rules, they ask me to break them and that's not right. So since they don't seem to give a rat, why should I?
Don't assume that because we're related or friends that I will put them before my business.
And if they really want to find out whether the business means more to me, test me and see.

The Captain
07-05-2006, 06:34 PM
Be sure you document all the problems and the actions you take/ have taken to correct each. Remember if you are indeed his 'employer', you fall under all of those stupid regulations that can get you sued. As much as we all would like to drop kick guys like this, don't. Be sure you handle this the proper way, like a pro and don't lose your cool.

Good Luck.......The Captain

MMLawn
07-05-2006, 07:17 PM
It is against the Law to dock his pay...esp for the reasons you gave :hammerhead:

SWD
07-05-2006, 07:31 PM
A continually poor performing employee is gone - period.
You have explained, trained and monitored and still he doesn't perform properly.
He's gone.
Don't loose sleep over it, don't fret the possible poor feelings - you aren't the root cause for his dumbassness, so why should you pay for it?

nitrotim
07-05-2006, 08:03 PM
I have an employee age 40 that continues to make mistakes that in turn cost me money for example weedeating with very short strings :hammerhead: can't keep a straight line when mowing :hammerhead: does not know when to mulch or discharge, :hammerhead: till I tell him and today he was cutting for 1/2 hr before I noticed that he had not put the deck down :hammerhead: should I dock his pay for every time he cost me money. I should have never hired someone I know.


In short I will go out on a limb and ASSUME you got into this buisness with your brain and not your heart. Enough Said.

Idealtim
07-05-2006, 08:28 PM
Fire him, he's holding you back and probly costing you money.

DJ Contracting
07-05-2006, 09:42 PM
Let him know about his frequent mistakes in a professional way. Make him understand how these things affect the overall performance of the business. Let him know that in the time it takes you to go behind and correct his mistakes, you could have done it yourself in the first place. If he continues to be careless, sever your business relationship with him. Just my .02

Thanks guys and thanks imograss very well said i'll take your advise and explain it this way.

dcondon
07-05-2006, 10:18 PM
IMO replace him immediately


I'm with you rod!! We went through a few people last year doing the same thing. Out the door you will go!!!:cool2:

MOturkey
07-05-2006, 11:28 PM
I've learned, in my 55 years on this Earth, that almost any human being can be taught to do almost anything. Just not necessarily taught to do it well.

Whether it is ineptness, lack of motor skills, mental capacity, laziness, or just a bad case of don't give a S***, some people are just never going to be good at certain things. Doesn't mean they aren't great people, or skilled in other areas, just means they aren't cut out to be jet jockeys, or lawn jockeys, or whatever.

Cut the guy loose before he drives you over the edge.

Howie's Lawn Care
07-06-2006, 12:27 AM
Well your right you should never hire a friend or someone you know. What's his attitude like? If you worked harder with him is there a chance he would improve? I also work at a large factory and this is a very common thing. Some workers catch on fast and others seem to take forever. But some of the slower ones turn out better in the long run if you work with them and they have a good attitude. Being there on time and not missing days are a much bigger poblem. You know him better than us. Is he worth the extra training time, will he listen to instruction, I mean if he is on time every day and is trying that may make a difference. We would not have very many employees at our factory if we canned them without going the extra mile to try to help them learn the new job. The first 6 month is considered a loss on most new manufacturing jobs, its just the cost of doing business. I know mowing is simpler but you have to make the call.
I worked with a kid at my weekend job until he got in a car accident and broke both his feet. The woman he hit died. Anyways, he has worked the last couple summers for his uncles construction company. I worked with him and he is a very reliable hard worker. We dicided he would work for me next year, but I don't know how things will work out now with the car accident still unfolding. He's done roofing for his uncles business and wanted to do some roofing jobs himself this summer. I'd like to have him work for me so maybe I can do some roofing with him. I'd like to maybe do roofing and landscaping. My friend did mow two lawns for a neighbor with a dixon, so I know he has experience with a ZTR. I just wanted to show an example were I think it would be a good hire. Some people have the ability to do good work and you CAN count on them.

-Nick Howard

StBalor
07-06-2006, 10:13 AM
In the famous words of Donald Trump " YOU'RE FIRED!"