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absolutelawnman
07-06-2006, 09:37 AM
Interested in knowing what your opionion is on a net return on a $32k property payed over 12 months. Preferably from some guys close to our cost of living and similiar areas. I am doing a mid season checkup on some of my properties.

hoskm01
07-06-2006, 10:29 AM
$32k Is Your Charge Or Value Of The Property, A Little Vague On Info.

absolutelawnman
07-06-2006, 10:40 AM
The contract for the entire year is $32k this includes 29 mowings, weekly bed maintenance, fert and weed, and fall cleanup with misc other. They pay $2700 per month

MMLawn
07-06-2006, 11:03 AM
There is NO WAY that anybody on here other than YOU can even begin to answer your question. Nobody on here knows what your cost of doing business per hour is other than you and that will be the direct result of what you "net" on this acct. Hell, you should have known the answer to this question WHEN YOU BID THE ACCT. Otherwise how did/do you know you were even making any money at all on it. And even from guys in "Preferably from some guys close to our cost of living and similiar areas" as you ask is not revelent. Some other LCO right beside you may have a COB of $20 an hour and yours may be $50.

absolutelawnman
07-06-2006, 11:26 AM
MM Lawn,
I do know what the cost of doing my business is, I do know what my price per man hour is, I am just interested if you have a $32k property what you might expect to net after it is all said and done with, what would you want to take home to momma. 10%, 40% what is realistic.

MMLawn
07-06-2006, 11:32 AM
That's what I am saying though. Your COB and mine or the guy right next door to you will be different, so it really doesn't matter what others are doing. BUT in the "real world" (I least in my book, for what it is worth) you need to be around 30% profit at least, if you want to run a truely successful business. And 40% is even better, but is not really as likely if you are bidding and pricing agreessively.

bullethead
07-06-2006, 11:47 AM
That's what I am saying though. Your COB and mine or the guy right next door to you will be different, so it really doesn't matter what others are doing. BUT in the "real world" (I least in my book, for what it is worth) you need to be around 30% profit at least, if you want to run a truely successful business. And 40% is even better, but is not really as likely if you are bidding and pricing agreessively.

I assume you are talking "Gross Profit" margins in that range, not net profit margins?

absolutelawnman
07-06-2006, 12:08 PM
mmlawn,

so you are saying that on the $32k after I pay for everything (=net) that I should put $9600-$12800 in the bank?

jpa375
07-06-2006, 12:25 PM
:hammerhead:

MMLawn
07-06-2006, 02:37 PM
I assume you are talking "Gross Profit" margins in that range, not net profit margins?


Yes, but they "really" are the same thing anyway, unless you are a sole prop and taking the "profit" as your salary.


Net profit
Definition

Often referred to as the bottom line, net profit is calculated by subtracting a company's total expenses from total revenue, thus showing what the company has earned (or lost) in a given period of time (usually one year). also called net income or net earnings.


Related Terms

profit, profit margin



Gross profit
Definition

Calculated as sales minus all costs directly related to those sales. These costs can include manufacturing expenses, raw materials, labor, selling, marketing and other expenses.


Related Terms

gross profit margin

MMLawn
07-06-2006, 02:46 PM
mmlawn,

so you are saying that on the $32k after I pay for everything (=net) that I should put $9600-$12800 in the bank?

Yes. The only "excemption" might be that if you are a small sole prop operation and are taking your "salary" from the profit margin. In that case it would still be this amount,minus your salary. Remember you are in business for one reason. To make a profit. Yes, you may have to pay additional taxes on this profit, but it is what makes your company healthy, valueable and stable. In addition the profit is also where your "rainy day" or "opps, something came up" or as some say your "Murphy" money comes from. If you are in business, and even if you "think" you are doing well, but at the end of the month all you have done is pay your company bills including equipment and or vehicles, pay your employees, and pay your taxes, and pay yourself but you don't have any money left after that, then you aren't really in or running a successful business......you just have a job that you happen to "own"......and there is a big difference.

bullethead
07-06-2006, 03:43 PM
As you just posted the definitions, I'm not sure how you can conclude they are basically the same thing. I don't know about you but I can price commercial work all day at 30-40% gross margins and be competitive. If I shot for 30-40% net profit, people would start asking me if was Bill Gates and had some proprietary technology that could command those premiums.

To answer the poor guy's question, I would think a 40% gross margin would be fair. I would further define gross margin as sales - cost of goods sold. For cost of goods sold, in maintenance, you are talking about labor, fuel, supplies associated specifically with generating the related revenue.

Items such as rent, owners salary, insurance, utilities, and depreciation on vehicle & equipment, etc are fixed costs and are typically below the line (of gross margin). You incur these costs monthly whether your guys are mowing or not - you'll hear it referred to as overhead, as well.

What you have left over is profit and what you have left after taxes is net profit.

MMLawn
07-06-2006, 04:24 PM
As you just posted the definitions, I'm not sure how you can conclude they are basically the same thing. I don't know about you but I can price commercial work all day at 30-40% gross margins and be competitive. If I shot for 30-40% net profit, people would start asking me if was Bill Gates and had some proprietary technology that could command those premiums.

To answer the poor guy's question, I would think a 40% gross margin would be fair. I would further define gross margin as sales - cost of goods sold. For cost of goods sold, in maintenance, you are talking about labor, fuel, supplies associated specifically with generating the related revenue.

Items such as rent, owners salary, insurance, utilities, and depreciation on vehicle & equipment, etc are fixed costs and are typically below the line (of gross margin). You incur these costs monthly whether your guys are mowing or not - you'll hear it referred to as overhead, as well.

What you have left over is profit and what you have left after taxes is net profit.



Dang......that's a mouthfull :hammerhead: I'll take it that you just like to hear yourself talk.....cause all of that says the same thing......kinda like you said......d,j,e,o,n,h,o, just to say John Doe....:dizzy: Sounds like you just took a Business 101 class........I did...more than 30 years ago, and 7 years before I received my MBA........I also got a news flash for ya............seems to me that all you were looking for was an arguement, not to help the guy, that's why as I do with most all newbies on here I almost didn't even answer your question, but I knew what you were doing so I did....and you didn't let me down :laugh: an you've also got the right screen name :laugh:

ALarsh
07-06-2006, 04:33 PM
97% net profit. $31,040 in the bank after all said and done. That is if your running a tight ship and have slaves for labor.

:dizzy: :hammerhead: :sleeping: :hammerhead: ;)

bullethead
07-06-2006, 05:39 PM
Dang......that's a mouthfull :hammerhead: I'll take it that you just like to hear yourself talk.....cause all of that says the same thing......kinda like you said......d,j,e,o,n,h,o, just to say John Doe....:dizzy: Sounds like you just took a Business 101 class........I did...more than 30 years ago, and 7 years before I received my MBA........I also got a news flash for ya............seems to me that all you were looking for was an arguement, not to help the guy, that's why as I do with most all newbies on here I almost didn't even answer your question, but I knew what you were doing so I did....and you didn't let me down :laugh: an you've also got the right screen name :laugh:

Whatever, I went to college, too, even got myself one of them there MBA's - bfd. I read post after post of people talking about how much they "gross", or "make" or "net" or whatever. Personally, I think it would be interesting to see what people's true gross margins and net margins really are. But, everyone defines them differently on this site and that's - if they even know what they are. I was not looking for an argument, just looking for clarification - sorry you inferred otherwise.

Flex-Deck
07-06-2006, 08:25 PM
If I had a property that grossed $32,000 I would expect to bank $25,000. That type of account is gravy, as it is the smaller ones that pay the overhead. When I start the year, I have mostly fixed costs. Insurance is paid on a yearly basis. Depreciation is a know cost. I figure in $250 per month for maintainance and breakdowns - The only variable is basically fuel, and if my mowers are running, that is only 5% of the gross.

rodfather
07-06-2006, 10:02 PM
If I had a property that grossed $32,000 I would expect to bank $25,000. That type of account is gravy, as it is the smaller ones that pay the overhead. When I start the year, I have mostly fixed costs. Insurance is paid on a yearly basis. Depreciation is a know cost. I figure in $250 per month for maintainance and breakdowns - The only variable is basically fuel, and if my mowers are running, that is only 5% of the gross.

Brad, give me a friggin' break...where is your replacement cost? Labor? And the rest of your overhead? $250 for maintenance and breakdowns a month? What about a truck and trailer? Are you gonna tell me you run at 79% profit?

You have got to be kidding.

Flex-Deck
07-06-2006, 10:22 PM
Brad, give me a friggin' break...where is your replacement cost? Labor? And the rest of your overhead? $250 for maintenance and breakdowns a month? What about a truck and trailer? Are you gonna tell me you run at 79% profit?

You have got to be kidding.

You did not read my post - I said the smaller ones I already do cover all the bills - I can handle another $32,000 account, and at that point, it is not a lot of overhead - it is gravy. I figure $10 per hr. for depreciation, fuel and maintainance. I run my diesels for 5000 hrs. They are almost bullet proof. My cost of replacement, maintainance and fuel is minimal. The mowers I have mentioned above gross on average $95 per hr. of mower run time. My truck burns $250 per month of fuel - I would have a truck anyway. So do not jump to conclusions.

rodfather
07-06-2006, 10:35 PM
You did not read my post - I said the smaller ones I already do cover all the bills - I can handle another $32,000 account, and at that point, it is not a lot of overhead - it is gravy. I figure $10 per hr. for depreciation, fuel and maintainance. I run my diesels for 5000 hrs. They are almost bullet proof. My cost of replacement, maintainance and fuel is minimal. The mowers I have mentioned above gross on average $95 per hr. of mower run time. My truck burns $250 per month of fuel - I would have a truck anyway. So do not jump to conclusions.

I read your post Brad....that is why I replied to it.

I have 3 diesels mowers (325 Toros) on top of others and they are not bulletproof. And when they break, they cost 2 or 3X over all my other mowers actually...just like my diesel trucks vs. my gassers.

If you think replacement is minimal, go and buy something new...you are in for a rude awakening.

Jpocket
07-06-2006, 10:43 PM
:hammerhead: "Yes. The only "excemption" might be that if you are a small sole prop operation and are taking your "salary" from the profit margin. In that case it would still be this amount,minus your salary. Remember you are in business for one reason. To make a profit. Yes, you may have to pay additional taxes on this profit, but it is what makes your company healthy, valueable and stable. In addition the profit is also where your "rainy day" or "opps, something came up" or as some say your "Murphy" money comes from. If you are in business, and even if you "think" you are doing well, but at the end of the month all you have done is pay your company bills including equipment and or vehicles, pay your employees, and pay your taxes, and pay yourself but you don't have any money left after that, then you aren't really in or running a successful business......you just have a job that you happen to "own"......and there is a big difference.

YEP thats what I have "A job that I happen to OWN lol":hammerhead:

rodfather
07-06-2006, 10:52 PM
You did not read my post - I said the smaller ones I already do cover all the bills - I can handle another $32,000 account, and at that point, it is not a lot of overhead - it is gravy. I figure $10 per hr. for depreciation, fuel and maintainance. I run my diesels for 5000 hrs. They are almost bullet proof. My cost of replacement, maintainance and fuel is minimal. The mowers I have mentioned above gross on average $95 per hr. of mower run time. My truck burns $250 per month of fuel - I would have a truck anyway. So do not jump to conclusions.

Brad, with all due respect, you are a dentist by profession. You don't do this 50 or 60 hours a week like some of us.

greenscapes,inc.
07-06-2006, 10:55 PM
If I had a property that grossed $32,000 I would expect to bank $25,000. That type of account is gravy, as it is the smaller ones that pay the overhead. When I start the year, I have mostly fixed costs. Insurance is paid on a yearly basis. Depreciation is a know cost. I figure in $250 per month for maintainance and breakdowns - The only variable is basically fuel, and if my mowers are running, that is only 5% of the gross.

That does not make much sense. So you are saying you will make $25,000 on that one account and the small accounts pay the overhead? Then you are making nothing on the smaller accounts. It all evens out how ever you put it. I can say my big accounts pay my overhead and the small accounts are money in my pocket. Wow $250 a month for maintenance and $250 a month for vehicle gas? I would kill for that.

MMLawn
07-06-2006, 10:56 PM
Brad, with that flawed "profit" and "COB" thinking you just displayed in your post......PLEASE remind me to never get you to fix my teeth.....or cut my grass :waving:

boatdude
07-06-2006, 11:09 PM
OK...I have to weigh in...I can't help myself. Full disclosure...I am an entrepreneur wannabe...full time job is as an accountant.

Bullethead...besides being right, your explanation is crystal clear. I have no idea why MMLawn (who I believe is the real deal and really knows his shzznit about this business) jumped you about your post. When talking margins it is always important to be clear whether or not it includes a load for fixed costs ("overhead").

Flex-deck (Brad)...it is because of posts like yours that discussions about margins always become confusing (you are better than your last post indicates...I have been reading you on here for a long time) Rodfather made all the right points about your comments so I won't repeat them.

Later,
bd

bullethead
07-07-2006, 10:10 AM
OK...I have to weigh in...I can't help myself. Full disclosure...I am an entrepreneur wannabe...full time job is as an accountant.

Bullethead...besides being right, your explanation is crystal clear. I have no idea why MMLawn (who I believe is the real deal and really knows his shzznit about this business) jumped you about your post. When talking margins it is always important to be clear whether or not it includes a load for fixed costs ("overhead").

Flex-deck (Brad)...it is because of posts like yours that discussions about margins always become confusing (you are better than your last post indicates...I have been reading you on here for a long time) Rodfather made all the right points about your comments so I won't repeat them.

Later,
bd

Thanks.

Boatdude take the plunge - relative to being a CPA you can work the same or even more hours for less money. I know. firsthand. LOL

Flex-Deck
07-07-2006, 09:21 PM
It is bash time again huh: Here are my exact numbers so far this year, and my reasoning for making the statement above that I made. See if this makes sense to any of you. Maybe I am in left field and do not know it, or maybe I am on to something::: You tell me.
1. I have 11 accounts rangeing from 1 acre to 40 acres.
2. So far this year they have generated $25,000, and I have put 100 hrs. on my 595, and 159 hrs. on my 495 - Total of 259 hrs. This averages out to $96.50 per hr. of production by the mowers. This is a very consistant number that applies to about any size property I do.
3. My total fuel bill (All diesel - truck is diesel as well as mowers) since the mowing season started Apr. 1 is $1097 Which divided by 259 hrs of mowing is an average of $4.23 per hr. (This is truck and mowers total)
4. My total Farm Plan bill at John Deere (Includes filters, new blades, etc for maintainance) is $560 so far this year - divided by 259 hrs. = $2.16 per hr.
5. My total insurance bill for the year (Work Comp - Liability - Ins. on the mowers - truck - trailer) is $2300 - We will probably put on 700 hrs for the year - = $2300 divided by 700 hrs. = $3.28 per hr. This number is fixed so it gets cheaper the more hrs. I mow.
6. Mower and Truck depreciation - $7,000 per yr. - divided by 700 hrs = $10 per hr. This number also becomes less with more hrs. to a point.
Therefore here are the totals:
1. Income = $96.50 per hr.
2. Expenses:
A. Fuel - $4.23 per hr. Includes truck and mowers ---------- $4.23
B. Maintainance - upkeep per hr = -------------------------- $2.16
C. Insurance - Based on 700 hrs. mowing Per hr. = ---------- $3.28
D. Depreciation - Based on 700 hrs. mowing Per hr. = ------ $10.00
Total per hr. = -- $19.67

It is obvious from the above that I am only a half time mower - We mow from First week in Apr to about the end of the first week in Nov. = about 30 weeks. Which means I average 23 hrs. per week total mower running time. (700 divided by 30 = 23hrs.

I could easily handle a $32,000 dollar property, and if it was bid the way I have my present properties bid, it would involve $32,000 divided by $96.50 per hr. = 332 hrs mower running time. Even though the per hr. cost of Insuance would go down, I will not even change that - $19.67 per hr. cost times 332 hrs. = $6530 overhead (Truck-mowers-depreciation-Ins.-Fuel-Maintainance)! Therefore, $32,000 minus $6530 = $25,470

This was actually good for me, to sit down again and really figure costs, income etc. Thanks for the head-up.

DLS1
07-07-2006, 09:55 PM
Oh my the big boys (big company and or MBA's) are playing the big boy game of one upping each other. Since I have an MBA I guess I can play.

MMLawn Gross Profit is not the same as Net profit. Either you don't have an MBA or you never took Accounting 101. Or maybe you just forgot basic accounting.:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Flex-Deck
07-08-2006, 01:57 PM
OK guys - you read one of my posts, and came to the conclusion I was way off base, and it was bash flex-deck. Now you owe it to me to respond to the post two spots above this one so I can ascertain as to the fact I am on track or not.

DLCS
07-08-2006, 02:58 PM
5. My total insurance bill for the year (Work Comp - Liability - Ins. on the mowers - truck - trailer) is $2300.


Ok, one question. What company is your insurance through, seems like good prices. How much coverage do you have on your liability?

Flex-Deck
07-08-2006, 06:22 PM
Ok, one question. What company is your insurance through, seems like good prices. How much coverage do you have on your liability?

I have $1,000,000-2,000,000 - Insurance is thru Farm Bureau - Since I only have a very part time employee - like 40 hrs. per yr. and the rest of the mowing is done by family, I pay the minimum WC. Also I only carry liability and comprehensive on the truck.

topsites
07-08-2006, 06:32 PM
I don't really think it matters where you live or how much you charge...

I use a small % as a rough guide as to how much net profit I should have left after all is said and done (including my pay, I mean everything said and done). So while 10% would be on the high end of a guide, I'd say any profit is good, certainly I wouldn't scoff at 4% either, if it's pure profit, anything more than nothing is profit but too much is not that great either for more than one reason, takes too long to explain but anywhere around 4-6%, 2-3 is ahhh, 7-8 is great and 10% is high.

See now that makes it easy, on 32k, one maybe two grand by end of year should be pure savings, somewhere in that range.

Flex-Deck
07-08-2006, 06:44 PM
I don't really think it matters where you live or how much you charge...

I use a small % as a rough guide as to how much net profit I should have left after all is said and done (including my pay, I mean everything said and done). So while 10% would be on the high end of a guide, I'd say any profit is good, certainly I wouldn't scoff at 4% either, if it's pure profit, anything more than nothing is profit but too much is not that great either for more than one reason, takes too long to explain but anywhere around 4-6%, 2-3 is ahhh, 7-8 is great and 10% is high.

See now that makes it easy, on 32k, one maybe two grand by end of year should be pure savings, somewhere in that range.

It is obvious that we are on different pages. I have an S. Corp. Everything after expenses goes on my tax return. I do not pay myself a specific amount. Everything left is mine.

Mr.Mow-It-All
07-08-2006, 07:07 PM
If I had a property that grossed $32,000 I would expect to bank $25,000. That type of account is gravy, as it is the smaller ones that pay the overhead. When I start the year, I have mostly fixed costs. Insurance is paid on a yearly basis. Depreciation is a know cost. I figure in $250 per month for maintainance and breakdowns - The only variable is basically fuel, and if my mowers are running, that is only 5% of the gross.
__________________


Ok, Flex-deck so on all your properties you don't do any trimming or edging or blowing? Those too take time that you should figure into your cost per hour. Not bashing, just wondering if it something you missed. Also, you keep saying you could do this property very easy since you assume it is a "big" $32000 per year account. Well since I am from the same area as the original poster, I would assume that the property that is in reference is an HOA or something to that effect. I have an account that is over a 40k per year account that I spend only about 1 hour with my 60" diesel and the rest of the time is spent with the 21" and 48" walker mowers because there are 54 5-7k sq ft properties (house and yard) that all have to be bagged and of course are very small.

So I don't think you could do this account for 32k per year.

For the original poster, I can tell you we spend about 27 hours per week for 28 weeks (3 of us total, we weed beds and trim shrubs once a month) on this account, but like others have said only you can figure out how much you can make.

Flex-Deck
07-08-2006, 07:16 PM
Ok, Flex-deck so on all your properties you don't do any trimming or edging or blowing? Those too take time that you should figure into your cost per hour. Not bashing, just wondering if it something you missed. Also, you keep saying you could do this property very easy since you assume it is a "big" $32000 per year account. Well since I am from the same area as the original poster, I would assume that the property that is in reference is an HOA or something to that effect. I have an account that is over a 40k per year account that I spend only about 1 hour with my 60" diesel and the rest of the time is spent with the 21" and 48" walker mowers because there are 54 5-7k sq ft properties (house and yard) that all have to be bagged and of course are very small.

So I don't think you could do this account for 32k per year.

For the original poster, I can tell you we spend about 35 hours per week for 28 weeks (3 of us total, we weed beds and trim shrubs once a month) on this account, but like others have said only you can figure out how much you can make.

I do not do flower beds, or shrubs. I mow and trim yards only. Yes. we trim everything everytime. I carry a trimmer on the mower on big properties, and since everything is so spread out, on the first round I start the trimmer, and when I come to an obstacle that needs trimming, I stop, (tractor at idle, but still counting hrs.) trim, throw the trimmer back in the rack and go. This is very fast. I lower my flex-deck castor so it mows 1", and blends up to my 3" height of the main deck, run it down the curbs, and with double blades, it sucks all the weeds up and trims the curb for me. I have one place with a mile of curbs. Just as well be mowing a swath while you are trimming curbs. Right!!!! For me a $32,000 account would be mow - trim - blow only the grass areas. Good Point though. However my figures still stack up, because for me the $32,000 is what I do, and do well.

Flex-Deck
07-08-2006, 07:52 PM
Ok, Flex-deck so on all your properties you don't do any trimming or edging or blowing? Those too take time that you should figure into your cost per hour. Not bashing, just wondering if it something you missed. Also, you keep saying you could do this property very easy since you assume it is a "big" $32000 per year account. Well since I am from the same area as the original poster, I would assume that the property that is in reference is an HOA or something to that effect. I have an account that is over a 40k per year account that I spend only about 1 hour with my 60" diesel and the rest of the time is spent with the 21" and 48" walker mowers because there are 54 5-7k sq ft properties (house and yard) that all have to be bagged and of course are very small.

So I don't think you could do this account for 32k per year.

For the original poster, I can tell you we spend about 27 hours per week for 28 weeks (3 of us total, we weed beds and trim shrubs once a month) on this account, but like others have said only you can figure out how much you can make.

The original poster gave no details - just said $32,000 property. An this brings up an interesting point which I have addressed before. I have two mowers, and am dedicated to mowing and trimming grass only. Every day I leave the house, all my machines are up and running and producing. If I was into landscaping also, I would need twice the investment, and when I was landscaping, the mowers would be idle, and when mowing the landscaping stuff would be idle. I truely believe that one needs to dedicate himself to one line of the business (I am solo - wife and me). It keeps invesment in equipment minimal, and profits maximized.

David Haggerty
07-08-2006, 07:55 PM
This thread highlights some of the differences between businesses and a sole proprietorship. Or entrepreneur or DBA or whatever else we're called.

I understand Flex's position because I'm in the same situation. Our expenses don't fluctuate with every contract won or lost. It's not really worthwhile re-figuring cost of business with each job.

I'm guessing a sole proprietor's fixed expenses are a much greater percentage than a normal business. When we hit the level of income where our fixed expenses are covered, the next job coming along is "gravy" or profit.

On a $32k job like this I suppose a business would calculate their costs, figure in an acceptable margin of profit and cut their bid in half. Or more likely use that profit to put on another crew or otherwise expand their business.
The only way to expand my operation would be to have myself cloned. Because I'm not hiring anyone. That leap in profits would be mine.

We have different parameters and different goals. What if my new truck isn't halfway worn out by the time I retire. I don't think it was a foolish investment. It'll make a mighty fine camper toater. Paid for by the Lawn Care Company.:)

Personally I always thought most businesses were entirely too short sighted. All that hiring and firing to keep pace with market trends. Buying the cheapest equipment out there so it could be depreciated on a 3 yr schedule. Nothing I've seen in the past 30 some years I've been mowing has made me change my mind.
Dave

lsylvain
09-13-2006, 06:01 PM
There is a million ways to figure out how much you earn on a specific job. Not one of them is 100% correct and not one of them is 100% wrong. It depends on what information you are trying to gain. I know this because I am a cost accountant. ie. I get paid to figure out how much of our product cost was/will be spent on paperclips this/next year. In reality profit is what you have in your checking account. Yes, so of you are correct saying that it cost you X per job and you profit Y on this job etc etc. but in reality you may only have $4.00 in the bank, so your as it was so eliquently put "take home to mamma," is only $4.00.

Fact is, in my operation an extra Mow job for $32,000 estimated by me and mowed by me, with my equipment, etc. and most importantly at my current level of business would put about an extra $22,000 in the bank. Now, if I cost out each paper clip, stamp, drop of gas, insurance, etc, etc, etc. it would be much lower profit allocated to this particular job. But, the profit on all of my other accounts would go up since now I would be speading my insurance, rent, repairs, depreciation and other fixed and semi fixt cost across one more job reducting my cost per hour and cost per job. So again, I would take home about $22,000 extra to mamma durring the year, because of this extra job. You may be different. If this is your only job, you probably will be lucky to break even depending on your expenses of course. If you have a huge company and currently have contracts on the properties beside, behind and accross the street from this one walking with $30,000 isn't out of the question.

Hope this helps.