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wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:26 AM
Last month I received an invitation to speculate on how to build a walkway up this.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:34 AM
I wasn't the first to be invited into this suggestion game. In fact I was a choice of last resort.:rolleyes:

I offered my idea to the engineering company that had called me out to the location.

One thing led to another and I got the job of installing my concept using their people and my son.

First we had to dig the holes.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:36 AM
Did I mention these were big holes?

Did I define "big"? Like twelve inches by five to six feet is big?

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:38 AM
Then there was the setting of the posts, that wasn't any fun either.:confused:

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:42 AM
Four by four inch by three eighths angle iron weighs just short of ten pounds per foot. These ten foot long pieces were heavy.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:46 AM
Think roller coaster track.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:50 AM
Think of, well, about seventy feet of roller coaster track.

And an occasional fire.;)

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:54 AM
Now I know you're ahead of me and have it all figured out.

But when I was standing at the bottom of the hill looking up that morning I saw the roller coaster track because it was what I had to do to accomplish this.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:58 AM
As you can see we have a walkway.

So far we have fifty each two feet by four feet by three to six inches thick sandstone slabs placed. They weigh between three hundred and four hundred pounds each. Thicker is heavier.

We're waiting for an additional twenty so we can complete the deck part of the walkway.

copeblk
07-09-2006, 12:03 PM
are the steps going to just be floating there or are you going to back fill? also are you going to put up a hand rail? and is this a resident or comercial project? looks good so far good thinking as how to go about this.

Squarepeg
07-09-2006, 12:25 PM
Wow. Thats a great looking solution.
Hope there's a handrail though! :D

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 07:29 PM
There will be no back fill involved. This is an engineered hill made to support one heckuva pool and entertainment area.

However, we are in discussions with the client about having a creek coming down along side the walkway.

For the handrail I picked up some hammered tubing from King Metals. 1 X 2 11 gauge for the top rail, 1 3/8 square 11 gauge for the posts and toe rail.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 07:32 PM
I've found a light coating of rust easier to deal with than the coating of grease and or oil that metal comes with when new.

The posts will be welded to the angle iron frame underneath and come out and up with a smooth bend.

Here's my bender.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 07:35 PM
Don't laugh.

It works.

Repeatedly and often.

BSDeality
07-09-2006, 07:52 PM
wow. I thought TX was flat! thats a hell of a grade to work on.

mulcahy mowing
07-09-2006, 08:16 PM
I have to see the finished product looks amazing! nice work there

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 10:53 PM
wow. I thought TX was flat! thats a hell of a grade to work on.

If we get the water feature project I've proposed we'll be working on this sidehill.

Imagine a line of stone stacked to mimic a rock formation in the mountains out west where you have dirt, then a line of stones, then dirt. Except this line of stones will have a stream being fed by springs in the side of the hill.

Did I mention that we can't get equipment back here and it all has to be done with manual labor?

wirenut
07-09-2006, 11:06 PM
just a few ?'s ...not ment to bash you
how are they anchored to the steel ?
what makes you think they will stay put ? just their weight...
what about building codes ? thats a lot of weight sitting atop a post
you think the welds will hold up being rocked back and forth ?
looks like galvy pipe weld to cold rold steel was the galvy ground off ?
is this a public place ? handrails ? i see a lot of liability issues here
kinda scary in this sue happy sociatey

THEGOLDPRO
07-09-2006, 11:17 PM
im not gonna lie to you it looks like ****, sorry man.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:34 PM
just a few ?'s ...not ment to bash you
how are they anchored to the steel ?
what makes you think they will stay put ? just their weight...
what about building codes ? thats a lot of weight sitting atop a post
you think the welds will hold up being rocked back and forth ?
looks like galvy pipe weld to cold rold steel was the galvy ground off ?
is this a public place ? handrails ? i see a lot of liability issues here
kinda scary in this sue happy sociatey

Every stone rests on the stone below it. AND it's bolted with galvanized studs epoxied into the stone to the angle iron.

I'm building this for an engineering firm that specializes in soil stabilization and retaining walls. Their experts have okayed my system. We not only have my own multimillion dollar product liability insurance but theirs behind the construction.

Evidently you're not familiar with welding. We used galvanized schedule forty three and a half inch pipe because of the ground contact. I did the welding myself. I know the welds are good. I've been doing this kind of welding for almost thirty five years.......successfully.

If you read the posts you'd have noticed I am building a handrail for the project.

I've never been sued. Not for my work, products, nor anything else. I operate on the priniciple of doing the best I can the best way I know how and carrying liability insurance.:clapping:

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:37 PM
im not gonna lie to you it looks like ****, sorry man.

I can live with that.

Kind of reminds me of a bumper sticker on a bud's forty six Ford hot rod in primer "Only a fool criticizes a project in progress."

THEGOLDPRO
07-09-2006, 11:51 PM
well ill let you know if my opinion changes when i see the final product.

wroughtn_harv
07-09-2006, 11:55 PM
well ill let you know if my opinion changes when i see the final product.


That's more than fair.

gammon landscaping
07-10-2006, 02:05 AM
guys i like it, it is not the same ole thing we all see and install everyday. this is a very challaging site. it seems that i have to work in sites like this more and more often these days.i like the approch and the work to date. any time we think out side the box we make progress. if we did things the same way as we use to, we would all have all grass propertys and be parking in the yard. but when people think of new ideas like side walks, bushes, fountains, lighting, and anything else we can thing of to sell home owners, we evolve.
i like, good work, keep it up, god speed

Up North
07-10-2006, 11:59 AM
Well Harv, I have to say...an elevator would have been easier!:dizzy:

Personally I think it's really cool. That's a heck of a challenge and I think having a stone walkway that looks suspended like that is kind of cool. Good job and definitely show us the finished product.

Buck

jd boy
07-10-2006, 12:29 PM
very few people, me included would tackle that. That is a creative solution and it is going to be awesome!

mag360
07-10-2006, 09:06 PM
http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=94150&highlight=welding+wood

Check out some of wroughtn-harv's finished projects at the above link. I think it's a safe bet that this project will be equally impressive.

wroughtn_harv
07-12-2006, 11:05 PM
Thanks for the kind words.

We've been at a standstill over getting the rest of the stone. I've finally got it arranged where I'll go to the quarry up in Oklahoma myself to pick it up.

We should have the job looking real small by the middle of next week.

I didn't take any pictures and I should have because some of you might have enjoyed seeing how I bent the top rail (one by two bent the hardway). Basically I cut three pieces of top rail about six feet long. I put one piece at a time into my furniture maker's forge. When the steel was orange enough to almost see through I pulled it out. The orange part was about eighteen inches long. All I had to do was gently tap the end against the floor. A perfect gentle bend appeared.

I put three of these bends in each piece.

Think using a CAD program on your computer. I'm going to use the same principle on the top rail. When I come to a curve I'll cut and paste one of the curves I made into the railing.

Thanks again. Attached is a picture of the forge with a piece of pipe cooking in it to help you understand what I'm describing.

VWBOBD
07-13-2006, 12:13 AM
This Dude Must Have Been $$$$$
Well A Fool And His Money.........

firefightergw
07-13-2006, 12:37 AM
Harv,

Keep attaching pictures. Really innovative what you are doing. Most of us have learned to do good work but it looks to me like you have moved beyond learning a craft and are into artistry. Wish I had your talent.:clapping:

wroughtn_harv
07-15-2006, 10:35 PM
Today was a very hard day on us physically. It was hot (bank sign said 107) and there wasn't a breeze to be found.

The stone was delivered this morning about the time that I found my skid steer had a diesel leak. One of the things you don't do in multimillion dollar neibghorhood is bring a piece of equipment that's leaking oil or fuel.

So I borrowed a friend's New Holland with a set of forks I made for him.

This is my son in law (in shorts) and my adopted son (his choice) moving one of the slabs on to the forks.

wroughtn_harv
07-15-2006, 10:40 PM
We had some fun with son in law over this scenario. But it worked out really good. One man operating the tree dolly with a three to four hunded pound slab of stone and one man acting as the brakes.

Son in law lost a finger nail and had two fingers broken when one of the slabs split when we weren't ready for it. That was in the morning. We found out how bad it was this evening when he finally went to the emergency room.

Kid's gottem'.:clapping:

wroughtn_harv
07-15-2006, 10:52 PM
We have all the stone in place for the walkway. The additional stones will be placed between the stairs out of sight built by the pool builder or we'll split them into two inch thick pieces to continue the walkway across the lawn.

I'll be working on the handrails next week. But the stone work is done.

Up North
07-16-2006, 01:18 AM
:clapping: :clapping: Bravo! Fine looking job Harv.

Buck

mbella
07-20-2006, 10:59 PM
Harv, that is the most ridiculous looking back yard I've ever seen. It looks like the landfills we have around here.

I have to ask, what in the hell is at the bottom of the steps that would make somebody feel that they need to get down there with the ease that a set of steps, such as those you installed, provides?

Cremlor
07-21-2006, 12:27 AM
Harv....I think your work is phenominal and I'm looking forward to viewing your next projects...great work!!!:canadaflag:

wroughtn_harv
07-21-2006, 07:40 AM
Harv, that is the most ridiculous looking back yard I've ever seen. It looks like the landfills we have around here.

I have to ask, what in the hell is at the bottom of the steps that would make somebody feel that they need to get down there with the ease that a set of steps, such as those you installed, provides?

Think of a private park on a lake with picnic facillities etc landscaped and maintained. This is one of the premium lots in the area. The hill you find offensive was created to hold a swimming pool. Water is heavy. You can't just put it anywhere and expect it to stay.:laugh:

DoetschOutdoor
07-21-2006, 02:27 PM
I dont even want to think about what their bill is going to be when everything is finished...excellent work also

South Florida Lawns
07-24-2006, 08:37 PM
Harvey your work is amazing.

I took a long look at your website especially that pond you re-did, boy I'm amazed.

All those pictures gives you an idea just how much work went into the projects.

Very nice work, your like the jack of all trades kinda person.

Fro
07-24-2006, 09:09 PM
I'm curious harv, where did you get your start? You got a ton of knowledge and experience. I'm young and always tryin to learn new things to advance my knowledge and ability in the field. Just wonderin what got you kicked off so that you are where you are today?

lawncare18
07-24-2006, 10:42 PM
Great work.. must have been bad witht hat heat.. how did you guys work all day doing that hevay labor with it being so hot.. i understand your from down south but man that is hard work you do.. Show us more pics of you and your projects and of the crew !!!! Keep up the good work harv.

wroughtn_harv
07-25-2006, 08:07 AM
I'm curious harv, where did you get your start? You got a ton of knowledge and experience. I'm young and always tryin to learn new things to advance my knowledge and ability in the field. Just wonderin what got you kicked off so that you are where you are today?

Thanks for all the kind words everyone. I think our advantage is we are enjoying what we're doing.

Interesting observation Fro.

One of my advantages came at the supper table when I was a kid. My father is one of those guys who never say much to you about how good you're doing. In fact his silence says you're doing good if you know what I mean. He comes from the school of thought that you know when you're doing good and you don't need to be told.

Over the supper table my father would talk about the work he did and the kinds of men he worked around. He built fence and eventually took some classes and learned to weld. Then he became the gate man at the fence company where he made the gates and was in charge of the inventory.

He'd talk about the men at the fence company. He'd have respect in his voice for some and disgust for others. The ones he respected were the hard workers who thought on their feet and could do anything the job required.

So like every other son of a father I wanted my father's respect. I didn't want anyone to hear disrespect in his voice when he talked about me. The end result is I wanted to be the kind of man my father respected and admired.

It wasn't until I was in my forties that I realized where and how I got my work ethic. That realization was quickly followed with the understanding and appreciation that I'd had my father's respect and admiration since I was in my twenties.

You might say my best break in life was eating supper with the family at home every night.

The next best break came with having a curiosity about how things work and how those who make things work think.

I just turned fifty eight this month. So I have forty plus years of questioning and observing to draw upon when I'm facing a situation.

One of the reasons I like to post on sites like this is to get people thinking out of the box. It isn't a Walmart world no matter how much some want us to think it is.

wroughtn_harv
07-25-2006, 08:15 AM
Great work.. must have been bad witht hat heat.. how did you guys work all day doing that hevay labor with it being so hot.. i understand your from down south but man that is hard work you do.. Show us more pics of you and your projects and of the crew !!!! Keep up the good work harv.

I've found the heat is just something you have to deal with this time of year.

I've decided it's about eight degrees.

Last week when we were running in the middle one hundreds I was thinking I had reached that magic age where the legs go and we have to fold our tents.

But since Saturday when the temps have modified to the mid nineties I'm like a brand new man.:)

I have to be careful in the heat. In my younger days I was one of these guys that always reached down for a lower gear and kept on trucking when the heat kicked my butt. Just about every year there would be a situation where I'd get sun sick and work on through it.

Those times have added up now. I'm very in tune with my body and the heat because I know that I can't work like I used to in it. I drink a lot of water and I pace myself.

I have to do this. The alternative is to give up being a working dawg and learn to become a pointer.

Fro
07-25-2006, 09:01 PM
You do good work and may you be blessed with forty more years of great service. My ole man has backed me alot and i strive to do the best i can just as he does. its all about hard work and a great attitude towards whatever you do.

wroughtn_harv
07-29-2006, 10:08 PM
We're getting down the good part of the job. The good part is when the end is in sight and pay day is around the corner.:)

One of the things I see often in people who want to make things but don't is they're afraid of failing. From my perspective that makes no sense at all. Because we learn more, a lot more, from our mistakes than we do from our successes. Well, except our successes give us confidence and we need confidence, right?

The other thing I see holding people back is they don't understand that it isn't perfect every step of the way. Certain phases of a project in progress is down right ugly, gawdawfull ugly sometimes.

Here's an example of what I mean.

This is a shot of the handrail after welding.

wroughtn_harv
07-29-2006, 10:14 PM
In that phase of the process we've got the ug and ly in ugly. It looks terrible.

This handrail had to be formed in place because every step of the way there's a curve or dip that would be almost impossible to successfully duplicate in the shop.

So the technique I used on this one was the old cut at a time with the portaband saw. If you think about it any curve is a series of bends tied together. Depending upon the curve, tight or long, I make cuts with the bandsaw and then I make my bends. When I have the bend I want I weld it all back up.

This was a compound bend, up and out.

wroughtn_harv
07-29-2006, 10:19 PM
Here's the same bend after the welds were ground down.

wroughtn_harv
07-29-2006, 10:27 PM
And here it is after a coat of primer and the first coat of color.

Yup.

I picked that ugly pea soup green on purpose.

I picked it for the same reasons I picked the hammered tubing for the material for the handrail.

Think of a puppy.

Now think of a puppy that's so ugly that it's beautiful.

Same principle.

I have one more step after the handrail is all that pea soup green. I'm following that with a can of Rustoleum black spray paint. I put on a light coat of black over the green and then I wipe it off just right-wrong. What is left is a very old appearing handrail that once was an old school (bike term, I watch tv too) pea soup green.

wroughtn_harv
07-29-2006, 10:40 PM
As you can see we got the hundred and fifty six feet of three and a half foot high handrail-fence to match our handrail on the walkway. It'll be the same color but have hammered solid bar pickets with four inch spacing.

Some will look at the handrail and wonder how I got away without putting pickets in. Architectual code requires pickets and four inch maximum spacing when the drop is more than thirty inches. When they're done with the landscaping and wall below my staircase we'll have less than thirty inches of drop off.

I'm always surprised at the difference a coat of paint makes.

crab
07-29-2006, 11:10 PM
i dig it it funky as hell!.i like everthing floating with the right plantings that would look killa.

mcwlandscaping
07-29-2006, 11:57 PM
Thanks for all the kind words everyone. I think our advantage is we are enjoying what we're doing.

Interesting observation Fro.

One of my advantages came at the supper table when I was a kid. My father is one of those guys who never say much to you about how good you're doing. In fact his silence says you're doing good if you know what I mean. He comes from the school of thought that you know when you're doing good and you don't need to be told.

Over the supper table my father would talk about the work he did and the kinds of men he worked around. He built fence and eventually took some classes and learned to weld. Then he became the gate man at the fence company where he made the gates and was in charge of the inventory.

He'd talk about the men at the fence company. He'd have respect in his voice for some and disgust for others. The ones he respected were the hard workers who thought on their feet and could do anything the job required.

So like every other son of a father I wanted my father's respect. I didn't want anyone to hear disrespect in his voice when he talked about me. The end result is I wanted to be the kind of man my father respected and admired.

It wasn't until I was in my forties that I realized where and how I got my work ethic. That realization was quickly followed with the understanding and appreciation that I'd had my father's respect and admiration since I was in my twenties.

You might say my best break in life was eating supper with the family at home every night.

The next best break came with having a curiosity about how things work and how those who make things work think.

I just turned fifty eight this month. So I have forty plus years of questioning and observing to draw upon when I'm facing a situation.

One of the reasons I like to post on sites like this is to get people thinking out of the box. It isn't a Walmart world no matter how much some want us to think it is.
You have just made me realize SO SO much about my dad and me with that post, i understand now, he treats me and talks to me the same way. Thank you very much!

mcwlandscaping
07-29-2006, 11:58 PM
You have just made me realize SO SO much about my dad and me with that post, i understand now, he treats me and talks to me the same way. Thank you very much!
That walkway is so SWEET!

wroughtn_harv
07-30-2006, 09:23 AM
i dig it it funky as hell!.i like everthing floating with the right plantings that would look killa.

I'm hoping the landscape guy will look at the palet I'm leaving him and see it as opportunity. There's so much potential there for the right combination of plants.

I wanted to build a stream that ran down along side the walkway. I think the combination of sound and scenery would be almost overwhelming. But I'm also the guy that sees too much as being just enough most of the time.

wroughtn_harv
07-30-2006, 09:39 AM
You have just made me realize SO SO much about my dad and me with that post, i understand now, he treats me and talks to me the same way. Thank you very much!

I'm glad for you to find this out this early in your life. I think little life truths like this make us better people, better parents, better spouses, and better kids to our parents.

I know the current school of thought is "good job" for everytime a child or person makes a move. I personally see that as almost as abusive as degrading someone every chance we get. They're both about distorting the reality of the situation for our own purposes.

With knowledge comes responsibility. So now you have to be more responsible in how you treat others because you understand relationships better. It makes life more complicated in some situations and richer in others.

Probably one of the most difficult and yet rewarding conversations you could ever have would be to share with your father your appreciation of his attitude on work and people. It would take your relationship with him to a new level. And it'll make him more appreciative of his own position in the lives of those around him because he'll be more aware and less instinctive in some situations.

I believe we're here to make life better for those around us. Not easier, better, they're not even related in some situations. From that perspective I've received more from your reply than you received from mine. And there's a lesson in that too.

paponte
08-13-2006, 07:46 PM
All I can say is unique. Thats what it takes to get ahead in ANY field. You definitely set yourself apart from others. Great solution IMO.:clapping:

wroughtn_harv
08-13-2006, 10:45 PM
I'm done.

Now all that's left is the landscaper gets to do his thing.

This is a shot from behind the pool looking out.

wroughtn_harv
08-13-2006, 10:47 PM
I got to do the fence around the top of the hill too.

What I wanted was the fence to be there but not be obvious or intrusive.

wroughtn_harv
08-13-2006, 10:49 PM
Here's the transition from my stone steps to the concrete steps provided by the pool builder.

wroughtn_harv
08-13-2006, 10:55 PM
Here are some shots of the finished product.

I feel I've left the landscaper a pretty decent palet with which to work his magic.

prostriper
08-14-2006, 04:06 AM
Job well done my friend! I couldn't wait to see the finished product. I must say it was more than I was expecting. Very well done!

oldsaw
08-29-2006, 03:15 PM
Wow! Harv
You do some awsome work,from another Texan that really appreciates your Hard work.I first your work a couple years ago on MTF
I think it was or maybe Hobart's or Millers forums anyway I still have your Home page and check in every now and then to see what you've done lately.
My favorite project of yours is still the bridge you built over the creek,for the cows to cross,The one with big Texas stars on the railings and stone around
All around the huge Culverts and the fancy post with chain.
Hope you don't mine if I show of you work,I still have pics of that project.
Truely Amazing :clapping:
oldsaw
Mike E.


A Harv Lacey Project

oldsaw
08-29-2006, 03:44 PM
oldsaw]Wow! Harv
You do some awsome work,from another Texan that really appreciates your Hard work.I first your work a couple years ago on MTF
I think it was or maybe Hobart's or Millers forums anyway I still have your Home page and check in every now and then to see what you've done lately.
My favorite project of yours is still the bridge you built over the creek,for the cows to cross,The one with big Texas stars on the railings and stone around
All around the huge Culverts and the fancy post with chain.
Hope you don't mine if I show of you work,I still have pics of that project.
Truely Amazing :clapping:
oldsaw
Mike E.

[QUOTE= It was at TBN where i saw my first project of yours!

A Harv Lacey Project[/QUOTE]

oldsaw
08-29-2006, 03:46 PM
oldsaw]Wow! Harv
You do some awsome work,from another Texan that really appreciates your Hard work.I first your work a couple years ago on MTF
I think it was or maybe Hobart's or Millers forums anyway I still have your Home page and check in every now and then to see what you've done lately.
My favorite project of yours is still the bridge you built over the creek,for the cows to cross,The one with big Texas stars on the railings and stone around
All around the huge Culverts and the fancy post with chain.
Hope you don't mine if I show of you work,I still have pics of that project.
Truely Amazing :clapping:
oldsaw
Mike E.

[QUOTE= Sorry for double post I;ve never used the quote feature Obviously![/QUOTE]


A Harv Lacey Project

firefightergw
08-29-2006, 10:42 PM
Harv,

Very good job! What all do you do?

wroughtn_harv
08-30-2006, 08:08 AM
Harv,

Very good job! What all do you do?

I like to think that I make things out of steel, wood, and stone. If you've been to Robson Ranch north of Ft Worth you've seen those eighteen foot wide cedar beam gates at their entry way. Today I'm installing a matching set at their new entry a mile or so west of the old one. I built a steel skeleton, two by six by eleven gauge rectangular tubing. Then I clad it in cedar two bys. When I'm done done it has the strength of steel and the appearance of cedar.

The job old saw was commenting on was one of mostest favorites. If there's anything more fun than making things it's helping people make things they never thought they could.

That bridge started off with a photograph by a TBN (tractorbynet) member shot of an eight foot diameter culvert six feet long in a gully on his ranch in central Texas. He wanted ideas how to build a bridge with it so he could drive his golf cart across it and save himself a mile's travel.

A bunch of us started bouncing ideas back and forth. That was followed by a get together at my shop on a weekend. We had about thirty people from Texas and Oklahoma over for bar b que and work.

It was a ton of fun watching stock pieces of new steel become all curved and special. It was even more fun watching the participants as it started coming together.

Then we had a party in place outside of Lexington Texas for the rock installation, again, work and food, what a combination.

I have been blessed with a perspective that's commonly called "out of the box". It's a handicap in most situations because I don't see things like everyone else. But there are occasions when it's in it's place and we get to have fun.

Lawnworks
08-30-2006, 12:34 PM
I would like to see pics of how the landscaper tied your walkway into the hill. If you don't mind what was the total bill for your walkway?

Up North
08-30-2006, 11:29 PM
I have been blessed with a perspective that's commonly called "out of the box". It's a handicap in most situations because I don't see things like everyone else. But there are occasions when it's in it's place and we get to have fun.

I wouldn't say it's a handicap...seems to me it's more of a gift. Maybe we should have you running for President with the vision you have. Always have been very impressed with your work Harv, very unique and very tastefull.

Buck

stevo22
08-31-2006, 07:04 AM
first of all i would like to say that is one of the most incredible walkway/handrail down a steep incline i have ever seen...plz do not take any offense to this but since no one else has asked do you care to share a balpark number of what you charged for such a great piece of work...

DoetschOutdoor
08-31-2006, 09:14 PM
Ive been wanting to ask that also since reading about that bad boy a while back

wroughtn_harv
08-31-2006, 09:56 PM
I'm working north of the Texas Speedway this week. I'll try to swing by and take some pics if the landscaper is done.

Quoting price is a touchy subject. First because clients follow us via the internet and if we do a lot of price quoting that can make life difficult in business. Let's say they see my walkway and then figure the one you're proposing is comparable. And they aren't, by a long shot, you can look like you're either a fool for working so cheap or you're a bandit trying to rip people off.

I'm not really sure what the final price was because I went doing my part and as a subcontractor. The only numbers that I know for sure and the only ones I'm interested in and am entitled to know about is what I charged for my part.

If a client had a similar situation and I was on my own I'd probably want between thirty and thirty five thousand to replicate it.

That's a lot of money I know. But it's also a lot of work and it's specialized to boot.

I appreciate all the complements and the private messages. One of my primary passions in life is work. And I hope in some small way I get to help others learn about the benefits of having a passion for the work.

wroughtn_harv
09-05-2006, 08:49 AM
I stopped by the job and took some photos the other day.

They ended up shooting hydromulch on the bank. It's some kind of grass that will cover, not require mowing, and soften the shape of the hill for the neighbors.

wroughtn_harv
09-05-2006, 08:56 AM
It will be interesting to see how it looks next spring. Right now the homeowner has been in construction mode for almost two full years between the house construction and the back yard.

But what a view!

wroughtn_harv
09-05-2006, 08:59 AM
One of the small challenges was transitioning from the walkway to the stairs provided by the pool builder.

wroughtn_harv
09-05-2006, 09:06 AM
Here's another shot of the last piece.

What we had was a ten inch or so rise from my last stone to the bottom step of the pool builder's stairs.

I didn't like it. Everything else was six inches or less.

So I picked up another stone, split it, and then using a small masonary bit on an angle grinder and a chisel trimmed it to fit.

wroughtn_harv
09-05-2006, 09:16 AM
Here's some shots of the pool and landscaping. It is gorgeous to be sure. I also want to emphasize that all I've contributed to this spectacular project was a little bit of fence and some stairs.

Everything else was done by professionals and they designed and did it well in my book.

wroughtn_harv
09-05-2006, 09:20 AM
Here's another shot of the last piece.

What we had was a ten inch or so rise from my last stone to the bottom step of the pool builder's stairs.

I didn't like it. Everything else was six inches or less.

So I picked up another stone, split it, and then using a small masonary bit on an angle grinder and a chisel trimmed it to fit.

Evidently I did something wrong submitting the photo. Here's another attempt.:)