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MDLawnman
07-09-2006, 10:58 PM
What does your company do with Bi-weekly contracts? Do you charge more because it's bi-weekly?
The grass is higher, it takes longer to cut - yadayada.
The weather here of late has been perfect for growing lawns. However I have one customer who calls and says that her grass did not grow this week - don't mow. I drive by her house and it's eight inches high and growing. She won't say that she wants her grass cut every other week, she just waits until it's really high.

Let me guess - drop her right? :hammerhead:

timmac
07-09-2006, 11:35 PM
dont you mean bi monthly?

MWHC
07-09-2006, 11:36 PM
We don't take bi-weekly accounts. Do you have time or money for gas to do a "drive by"? There are better customers out there. Go after them. The way we see it, if they don't want weekly mowing we can go make money doing something else. A mowing service is a luxury, go after customers that can afford you.

dcondon
07-09-2006, 11:42 PM
If you stay with her don't blow any grass clippings off the lawn or any extra work. If she wants it done charge her double. Thats what we do!!!

firefightergw
07-09-2006, 11:43 PM
We charge $5 more per cut for our bi-weekly accounts.

RyanD
07-09-2006, 11:46 PM
What is the negative about mowing bi weekly accounts? I have a commercial account that insist on a bi-weekly schedule. They even have it fertilized! I go over it once except for in the front area (high visibility) where I double or triple cut if necessary. I get paid for it. Takes me an hour. I charge $82. There are no drive by's. It gets done every two weeks until November.

Team-Green L&L
07-09-2006, 11:47 PM
Bi-Monthly clients are 90% PITAS. This is my experience. Scheduling is a pain, the grass is always overgrown and the reflection on your company is never as good as when you pull in front of a nice lawn to make it "nicer".

RyanD
07-09-2006, 11:49 PM
I will give you that much. Scheduling is a pain, especially if you have a few.

308
07-10-2006, 12:02 AM
Most accounts I mow only want it done once a month, I would kill to have get to cut my accounts twice a month. Joey S

K c m
07-10-2006, 12:23 AM
Run away from the job. its brutal. Especially if your 36 cant get through the gate :hammerhead:

DFW Area Landscaper
07-10-2006, 01:04 AM
I used to think these clients were the best because I assumed they would not call to skip in the early spring and late fall the way weekly clients sometimes do. What they do is, they cancel service in September when you've got 2 more months of mowing scheduled and then they wait until May to resume service the following spring. You schedule 17 mows on them and they weasel out of 8. Not all do this, but I've seen a small percentage try it.

We do have a lot of bi-weekly clients that don't do that kind of stuff and many are good clients...no complaints, no skips, no fertilizers, no BS. But the likelihood of bad things, like credit card declines, cancellations, complaints, etc, are much higher with a bi-weekly client than with a client who takes weekly mowing and the fert program.

The best clients are the ones who order mulch with their first clean-up. That is how you can spot a good client from a mile away...generally.

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper

Team-Green L&L
07-10-2006, 01:07 AM
I agree, good clients almost always want good services (ie, spring/fall clean ups and fert.)

HOOLIE
07-10-2006, 01:10 AM
dont you mean bi monthly?

Yes I've always wanted to take these folks on, then show up twice a week, then show them the dictionary definition of bi-weekly :laugh: "I'm sorry sir, but that's what you requested..." :laugh:

Around here, with the fescue, if you're getting enough rain on a regular basis, most every lawn needs it weekly. A few really crappy lawns can go every 2, but if they actually have a real lawn, it should be weekly.

topsites
07-10-2006, 02:12 AM
the likelihood of bad things, like credit card declines, cancellations, complaints, etc, are much higher with a bi-weekly client than with a client who takes weekly mowing and the fert program.

That's very interesting, I find zero difference between income classes on payment issues... I find someone in a rich neighborhood is just as likely to stiff me / bounce a check than someone in a low income area, but that's just me.

////////////

As for the scheduling, I make the schedule and each and every yard gets their very own cut schedule. The length of time between services depends on the condition of the lawn, class-A lawns get cut more frequently, lesser maintained lawns get cut less frequently, it's per lawn but also by the season:
All my lawns get cut most frequently in the spring, considerably less frequently in the summer, and it picks up some in september and then it slows down again until somewhere around october-november they all drop out with a few that grow up until X-mas.

As for actual variations... I use 8 days, 8-10, 10, 10-12, 12, 12-14, 14 and 14+, then it goes 2-3 weeks for the odd ones in the heat of summer. So right by everybody's name there is a number, and that is the current delay between services. If one results in a drive-by, if spring is over and the lawn is on 10-12, I change it to 12-14 and that usually fixes it, as an example. If that still doesn't do it, then change it to 14+ and all this comes with experience, usually a few drive-by's are inevitable but I don't get too many.
On the flipside, if it's overgrown when I get there and it's on 14, I change it to 12, as another example.

I do agree you have to watch out for pitas that like to let the grass grow up to your thighs before they think it needs cutting, but again, all my lawns are scheduled individually and I make the schedule. I will take some input from the customer on how often they think it needs it, but if we disagree then ultimately it's my schedule or the highway.

So, flexible scheduling, per individual lawn according to condition of turf and also by time of year.

MDLawnman
07-10-2006, 07:32 AM
Many thanks for all of the input. I had to look up biweekly in the dictionary just for my own info after some of the posts here. From the internet dictionary:

bi·week·ly

ADJECTIVE:

Happening every two weeks.
Happening twice a week; semiweekly.

NOUN:
pl. bi·week·lies
A publication issued every two weeks.

ADVERB:

Every two weeks.
Twice a week; semiweekly.

Have a good week!

crawdad
07-10-2006, 07:53 AM
...
As for actual variations... I use 8 days, 8-10, 10, 10-12, 12, 12-14, 14 and 14+, then it goes 2-3 weeks for the odd ones in the heat of summer. So right by everybody's name there is a number, and that is the current delay between services. If one results in a drive-by, if spring is over and the lawn is on 10-12, I change it to 12-14 and that usually fixes it, as an example. If that still doesn't do it, then change it to 14+ and all this comes with experience, usually a few drive-by's are inevitable but I don't get too many.
On the flipside, if it's overgrown when I get there and it's on 14, I change it to 12, as another example.

....

So, flexible scheduling, per individual lawn according to condition of turf and also by time of year.


Sounds too complicated. My lawns are every week, or in a few cases, every other week. Most of them are mowed on the same day of the week. No more ten day lawns.
If they say, after a week, "It doesn't look bad," I reply, "I'm not in the business of making it look bad." If you wait until it looks bad, it's a lot more work.

HighGrass
07-10-2006, 06:18 PM
I charge about 33% more for bi-weekly units. Some are a pain but they pay 99.99% of the time.

EvandSeby
07-10-2006, 09:39 PM
I asked my mom (English teacher) about whether its bi-weekly or bi-monthly and she gave me this answer, "bicycle = two wheels, bi-centennial = 200 years, bi-weekly = two weeks, bi-monthly two months" And bi-the way I still have a few bi-weekly clients who get charged extra for every little extra thing I can think of including $1.50 for a 15 cent 2 gph drip emmiter. Nickle and dime me, and I nickle and dime you right back. Most people have got the hint, but some just haven't got it. Bi-weekly are the first to get a price increase.

parkeeee
07-10-2006, 10:01 PM
Sounds too complicated. My lawns are every week, or in a few cases, every other week. Most of them are mowed on the same day of the week. No more ten day lawns.
If they say, after a week, "It doesn't look bad," I reply, "I'm not in the business of making it look bad." If you wait until it looks bad, it's a lot more work.

That's perfect crawdad.


The longer between cuts, if there's not a drought, the more it takes to make it look acceptable. I went into this business because I know what I'm doing and am very good at it. If a client can do it better... they can help themselves.

Steve

waffletown20
07-11-2006, 12:37 AM
I have a customer who was sick of mowing there lawn but could only afford bi-weekly so I mow it every other week as long as they mow it in between. It works really well for both parties.

MDLawnman
07-17-2006, 04:22 PM
OK now this is what I'm talking about. The person that made me start this post has not had her yard cut in three weeks, at her request. The grass in her yard is mid-shin high and it is 100 degrees outside. She just called and left a message that she wants her grass cut right now. I'm a bit too angry to call her back right now . . . . . I started cutting at sunup to beat the heat and now I'm home for the day. :mad: