PDA

View Full Version : How To "Make" Mulch Bed?


DSLND
07-31-2006, 12:45 AM
I was wondering how to make a "Mulch" bed out of an area that is either grass or dirt foundation. Do you just dig it out and put ur plants and edge, and then mulch? Is there a special machine? Heres a pic of what i am talking about. Thanks! -Mitch-

Ps. I would not want the plastic edging. I would want a real "edge" for the bed.

GardnerLandscaping
07-31-2006, 02:26 AM
books recommend placing a hose out to form the curve.

then, remove the grass either by mechanical means or by shading it with plastic tarp. Some people use grass killer which can stress your plantings later.

then, use a tiller to till the dirt to a decent depth. add a soil amendment to mix with the native dirt.

you'll want to trench the area where you will install the edging or use a flat shovel to just scoop out the tilled dirt. I prefer the plastic over metal, mainly because of cost, and secondly because it is easier to trim. If you're going to be maintaining the yard, I'd use plastic unless you like buying trimmer line.

make sure it is the high quality kind and you install it the right direction. The metal kind is held into place with spikes. Better quality plastic will have spikes as well. then, shovel the dirt back.

next, install your plants. finally, mulch. you can use a mulch like pine straw to provide a base mulch that is easy to rake out of the way and replace if the plantings aren't being done immediately.

GardnerLandscaping
07-31-2006, 02:35 AM
spray paint inside the hose so you can remove the hose for the next phase. look for spray paint designed for this purpose to minimize damage from over spray to the lawn.

DSLND
07-31-2006, 01:21 PM
Thanks! -Mitch-

GardnerLandscaping
08-01-2006, 06:28 AM
Oh, according to others, use of regular RoundUp shouldn't stress your plants after a day.

In either case, you should consider the use of a garden rake, thatch rake, or even a power rake to remove the dead grass so it doesn't come back later before you till. I think excessive plant material and roots mulched under can cause problems as well because when they decay, the suck up nitrogen.

In other words, what you do depends on the soil condition, what is already growing, and what is being planted.

GardnerLandscaping
08-01-2006, 07:59 AM
I also read repeated applications of RoundUp and tarp to kill bermuda properly. This is the stuff that books don't cover well.

In the past, I've dug up centipede which behaves a lot like bermuda and used the sod for patching the lawn. Very hard labor.

Team-Green L&L
08-01-2006, 09:23 AM
Use inverted marking paint and cut inside your lines with either power edger or edging shovel depending on the area size. Then cut the grass at a horizontal level to get rid of the excess grass. Irrigation tubing is a landscaper's nightmare if you ask me. Cut your edges 3-4" deep to allow for alot of definition.

TAZ
08-01-2006, 10:22 AM
Layout your shape, Round up the interior, Let it sit for a bit, either remove the interior with a sod cutter or manual means, Then as the above post mentined cut the shape with a power edger (little wonder bed shaper works well for this). Add any amendments to the soil, shape/sculpt the underliing dirt in the bed to allow for that 3-4" drop then apply mulch.

Also llike the above post mentioned I would stay away from any plastic or hose edging. A good drop on the edge and a trimmer turned sidways or a stick edger and it's allot easier to keep looking nice.

-TAZ

TAZ
08-01-2006, 10:25 AM
I also read repeated applications of RoundUp and tarp to kill bermuda properly. This is the stuff that books don't cover well.

In the past, I've dug up centipede which behaves a lot like bermuda and used the sod for patching the lawn. Very hard labor.

Poster is in IL... Killing cool season grasses shouldn't be problem with Round-Up.
-TAZ

DSLND
08-02-2006, 12:36 AM
WOW! Lots of replys! Great Info! Thanks Guys! -Mitch-