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View Full Version : Mclaren Rubber tracks for Skid steer


racetra
08-06-2006, 07:34 PM
Howdy all,
I just found this forum...Very cool!.
I have a Bobcat 863 that I was gonna sell and replace it with a track machine. Problem is, their like $45K for a new one. I just saw the Mclaren rubber tracks and watched the video and was impressed. Has anyone used these. I don't have a lot of clearance between the boom and the tire when the boom is all the way down. Any info would be great.

gammon landscaping
08-07-2006, 12:48 AM
well i was going to trade mine for a rubber track but the wanted 20k and my machine(close to new). and the mclarian tracks are 15k. so i spent 2k and got steal tracks

i am happy

racetra
08-07-2006, 03:14 AM
I have seen the rubber traCKS FOR $3200ish. I also really like my 863. Lots of power

all ferris
08-07-2006, 09:56 PM
well i was going to trade mine for a rubber track but the wanted 20k and my machine(close to new). and the mclarian tracks are 15k. so i spent 2k and got steal tracks

i am happy


I think you are thinking of logering VTS track that are 15k.

Just trade the 863 in on a nice used T200.

racetra
08-07-2006, 11:15 PM
I was lookin but pretty much all the used machines I saw looked like they were rode hard. All were mostly in the mid west where as you know the conditions are much more severe than they are here in Ca.

badranman
08-14-2006, 07:22 PM
If you find a used machine, call the dealer and ask for a price for a complete undercarriage. You'll have an idea of what you're faced with when it's time to replace. I had the same dilema. I decided on the solideal over the tire tracks. About $3500.00 Cdn here. Alot cheaper then dedicated tracks and we can take them off and use tires when the need for tracks isn't there.

racetra
08-15-2006, 12:45 AM
So, how are they working? I have seen a couple of not so good comments on those tracks. How are yours wearing? I am probably gonna order the Mclaren rubber tracks tomorrow. I guess I will be the guini-Pig for these....We'll see!

Scag48
08-15-2006, 03:43 AM
Now are you talking about the 100% rubber track or a steel track with rubber pads? Either way, the steel's with pads are bombproof and I've heard that the solid rubber tracks are fine as well as long as you don't get too crazy with the machine making turns.

badranman
08-15-2006, 06:07 PM
Well, the Solideal tracks have performed good with a bit of chunking. I'm talking pieces the size of teaspoons. Yes, these are the solid rubber tracks. We're careful to treat them right and not do crazy a$$ things with them installed. Only had them off once and I think it took us about 1/2 hr to do both, same to put them on. The tires don't show any adverse wear. We've rented tracked machines before and I'd say our machine performs about 80% as good. Tracked machine seems to have more flotation and be better balanced. our tracks seem to clean the insides better so we don't drag as much mud onto driveways like the tracked machines we've had. All in all they've served us quite well for the money. This year has been especially wet for us. i would've spent more than their costs in tracked machine rentals. I just can't justify the cost of a dedicated tracked machine when we only need it 10-20% of the year.

ksss
08-16-2006, 01:07 AM
It says a lot that you analyzed your need for track and made the appropriate decision. Many guys are buying a dedicated tracked machine for less than 20 percent of the jobs they do. There are guys are around here who have bought them for the 1 month a year it is actually muddy. I predict that the sale of tracked machines will stablize as prior owners trade back to tired machines. Certianly not all of them but I think many will. Mainly the ones who shouldn't have had one in the first place.

Scag48
08-16-2006, 01:32 AM
Many guys are buying a dedicated tracked machine for less than 20 percent of the jobs they do.

Yeah, my old man made that mistake. We really didn't NEED a tracked machine, but it certainly was nice to have that extra traction in the sandy soil we have out here, plus be able to run across pavement. I think if we need tracks again, steel tracks with rubber pads will be our move, but on a larger skid, a 216 wouldn't sling those heavy tracks very well.

ksss
08-16-2006, 02:52 AM
I have talked to a few guys who have said they are nice to have for certain situations. However when its time to put money back into the machine I wonder if the "nice to have here and there" will seem worth it. I think if your in the situation like the OEMs like to emphasize in their ads that their tracked machines buys you more work days a year than a wheeled machine, then your ahead of the game. However factoring in the higher inital up front costs and the upkeep you need to be logging a significant increase in productivity. The other issue I am seeing is the a$$kicking guys are taking at trade in time. I watch what my dealer is offering to take on trade for these used tracked machines and what I see on Iron Planet and it is bad.

Scag48
08-16-2006, 05:05 AM
Yeah the guy looking to buy our 277 is hosed because the dealer is going to give him absolutely nothing for his 257 so he wants to take that out on our price for the 277. 257's, in my opinion, seem to be large boat anchors, I've only talked to a few who actually like their's. I ran one a little, just messing around, and it felt extremely underpowered for it's size, whereas the 277 is heavier, but it's 78 horses, it really doesn't have any problem getting up on it. But you have be working in an environment that constitutes the use of tracks. We definately could use that, our productivity went up a ton when we ran the 277 on our landscape jobs, not only because it was a larger machine, but I know for a fact it would be faster than a 248 with decent tires on our sandy/steep terrain. Problem is, it was only useful in those conditions about 30% of the time, not really worth having around. Actually, we bought the 277 to assist in pushing small apple trees to a central pile when we do orchard removals. It does extremely well in that arena, so does a D5, but a D5 is about $50-60K for anything worth bringing home used and dozers sit 85% of the time around here, not a real multi-functional piece whereas the 277 could bounce around and do sitework, landscape work, and large volume debris removal.

racetra
08-17-2006, 12:53 AM
Well Guys,
I ordered The Mclaren Rubber tracks today. I should have them next week. I did look at the Solideal tracks a bit. They look pretty nice also. I think in the long run though, the mclaren units will be better suited for my use. I run a T-190 for my regular job and really do like the track thing. It will be nice to go to tires when I need to. I will let ya'll know how they work.

Timberman
11-22-2006, 08:15 PM
How do you like your tracks? I've been thinking about a set of the rubber padded McLarens for my S150, just not ready to cough up the $$$ yet.

racetra
11-22-2006, 10:12 PM
Hey Timberman
I like them a lot. They are defenetly the best way to go for over the tire tracks. The one thing I don't like is they change the final drive gearing. They are taller than the tires. It is like putting 35in tires on a truck that is setup for 32in tires. You lose some of the torque. Basically you need to just change the way you operate your tractor.

janb
11-23-2006, 03:24 AM
It says a lot that you analyzed your need for track and made the appropriate decision. Many guys are buying a dedicated tracked machine for less than 20 percent of the jobs they do. There are guys are around here who have bought them for the 1 month a year it is actually muddy. I predict that the sale of tracked machines will stablize as prior owners trade back to tired machines. Certianly not all of them but I think many will. Mainly the ones who shouldn't have had one in the first place.

I think a lot of us could use more 'flotation' this year... NH and Vt, last spring, now the PNW... nearly 30 inches rain since 1st of Nov...:cry: 10 day forecast = more of same. *trucewhiteflag* I have sold 2 of 4 commercial properties, (only my 'view' stuff remaining, should be ez to sell) so I'm hoping for 'the great escape' :walking: by next spring (graduate May 31). Back to the Mt. states, after 25+ yrs of this. (I hope, I hope)

ksss
11-23-2006, 03:35 AM
Come on out, still plenty of room, strong economy especially near the larger population centers. You may have to get a heavier jacket and insulated boots, but it is a small price to pay for the quality of life.

Timberman
11-23-2006, 09:11 AM
Glad to hear you like the tracks. I've also considered some superfloat tires for it, but I'd have close to 2K in wheels and tires. Gonna have to get one or the other this spring.

RockSet N' Grade
11-23-2006, 09:17 AM
JanB....same as Idaho, maybe even more so. We are on fire here - there is so much work it is hard to keep up. Some excavators I work with are booked solid with large crews through march, april , may of next year. Of course, that could all change in a heart beat, but for now it is good and the air is clean, mild 4 seasons.

bobbyg18
03-25-2007, 12:34 PM
its muddy out here...i have several jobs waiting for me, but i cant even attempt them until it drys out...even when it does i think i should be adding a pair of tracks to my operation...

what are better rubber or steel?...im thinking of adding a pair of these and need some feedback on which tracks i should be looking at?...ive looked at past posts but couldnt come to any conclusions...

i looked on ebay and see rubber tracks by both McLaren and Solideal...McLaren are going for $3K and Solideal for $2K...

also see alloy stee chains for $500...any suggestions?

tallrick
03-25-2007, 02:52 PM
The over-the tire tracks work well in the sand, but in the mud perfoamance varies according to type. The open style, segmented tracks work fine as long as you don't sink down. If that happend they clog with every piece of debris and mud. Even worse are the rubberband stle which can clog and come off when you turn. It's a shame that the no one has come up with a tensionig system for over the tire tracks.

The steel chai type seem to work just as well as rubber segmented, and do not change gear ratio. Bad thing, they make lots of noise and leave marks on pavement, as well as tearing out grass. Very easy to install and remove though.

racetra
03-26-2007, 12:31 AM
Howdy again, Been a while. I did like the tracks. Unfortunately I had some rather large medical issues so I sold the 863 with the tracks. After talking to a few friends with track machines, I have decided that that is not the best way to go. The tracks are scary on an icey hill. Especially if it starts to go a little sidways. Without the tracks and chained up in the rear works good but tears stuff up. If you chain up all 4, it works great but really tends to tear stuff up. With that said I have decided to look a little deeper at a Bobcat A300. With the 4 wheel steering you can chain up all 4 and not really tear anything up. Where I live there are a lot of folks with there 5 and 6000 sq ft. "Cabins" that really whine about everything. They all think it is a great place but they can make it better. Anyways, anyone runnin an A300