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manfromearth
08-11-2006, 07:50 PM
Hi all,
I have built fire pits, bbq pits, but no fireplaces. I'd like to build an outdoor fireplace for a client. I have extensive experience building mortared walls, flagstone patios, and the pits I mentioned. If you guys have any experience building outdoor fireplaces, I'd sure appreciate any advice you might have for me. I have included 3 attachments. They are the plans I drew up for this project (they are not very complex, at all). Please let me know what you think,,,comments, suggestion, criticisms are welcome! Thanks much.
Rob
ps...the plans do not reflect that I will be corbling the fire brick so that the top of the fire box will wrap nicely around the flue opening. I'll do this instead of using the 1/4" metal that I've shown on the side view plan. Also, I plan to use cinder block as the support structure for the fireplace to about the 8'8" mark and then corbling the mortared stone to acheive the narrowing of the chimney.

scarymary
08-11-2006, 10:04 PM
Hi there, I'm no expert on this subject, but I have been studying this as I would like to have an outdoor fireplace off my patio one day, and it seems to me that I read on a website somewhere, that since it is an outdoor fireplace, that a flue wasn't necessary. I wish I could remember what website it was so I could direct you to it, but I can't. I think your design is wonderful. And since you have that experience in masonry, I think you should go for it.

manfromearth
08-13-2006, 02:54 AM
thanks,,,I've done quite a bit of fireplace construction research since this post. I do think I'm going to go with the flue, even though it may not be necessary. Also, I've change the design a bit to make the chimney taper in more than I have on the original. Anyway, I made a visit to the customers home today and sold the job. They know I haven't done a large fireplace, but they are confident that I'll do a good job. I did tell them that I was my own worst critic and that really is true. So, thanks for the kind comments and if any one else has any words of wisdom regarding outdoor fireplace construction, they are very welcomed.

hortiscape
08-14-2006, 09:52 PM
Make sure you use a solid cement foundation.

manfromearth
11-04-2006, 12:23 AM
It was my first, but hopefully not my last. This is a quick pic...hope to have more, soon.

manfromearth
11-04-2006, 12:37 AM
I really do have the pic!

Lawnworks
11-04-2006, 02:17 PM
Wow, that looks like you have been doing fireplaces for years. I am sure the client was completely satisfied. How long did it take? How much $ in materials?

manfromearth
11-04-2006, 11:34 PM
Thanks for the comments. Yes, the customers are thrilled. The rock and mortar joints from my fireplace are matching an old wall they have within the courtyard that the fireplace is in. I spent about 14 days building this one, although I believe, now that I've done one, I could do it in 10. Of those 14 days, I had one helper for about half. I used a masonry insert, which made things go smoothly and insured that the fireplace would draw and not smoke excessively. Total materials was: insert (included firebox, smoke chamber, flues, fire brick, fire clay, and flexible lentel) 1,750, stone 400, mortar, cement, and rebar 400, misc. 150 .... fireplace has a gas log starter which the customer paid a plumber to install and I "masoned" (sp) around.

Mike33
11-05-2006, 09:55 AM
Very nice
Mike

scarymary
11-07-2006, 12:25 AM
gorgeous. If you don't mind me asking, what was the total cost, and how much did you get for building it?

PROFESSORRAIN
11-07-2006, 01:03 AM
Great Job Man!

manfromearth
11-07-2006, 08:55 AM
Hi Mary....my cost, materials/mileage/ham sandwiches and diet Code Red was around 3,000....did the job for around eight, but wish I had charged a little more [of course :-)] . Thank you for the kind words.