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View Full Version : What do you think of these two trucks?


mcwlandscaping
08-19-2006, 06:22 PM
1) http://www.autotrader.com/fyc/vdp.jsp?car_id=206015276&dealer_id=55991732&car_year=1997&mod_bookmark_id=null&search_type=both&num_records=&make=CHEV&transmission=&distance=50&make3=&model=CHEVC25&address=03062&make2=GMC&certified=&advanced=y&model2=GMCC25PU&max_mileage=&max_price=&bkms=1155965508153&min_price=&end_year=2000&color=&start_year=1996&drive=&engine=8+Cylinder&body_style=TRUCKS&doors=Two+Door&fuel=&lang=&cardist=22

2) http://www.autotrader.com/fyc/vdp.jsp?car_id=180801936&dealer_id=604634&car_year=1996&mod_bookmark_id=null&search_type=both&num_records=&make=CHEV&transmission=&distance=50&make3=&model=CHEVC25&address=03062&make2=GMC&certified=&advanced=y&model2=GMCC25PU&max_mileage=&max_price=&bkms=1155965508153&min_price=&end_year=2000&color=&start_year=1996&drive=&engine=8+Cylinder&body_style=TRUCKS&doors=Two+Door&fuel=&lang=&cardist=21

yes i know the diesel has a billion miles on it!lol just any input would be appreciated. Honestly though, i really like the 1997 Chevy Silverado reg. cab, the tan one.

thanks
mike

PerennialSuccess
08-19-2006, 06:26 PM
the tan gasser is nice. 6.5 diesel is one of the worst diesels ever.

Scag48
08-19-2006, 07:14 PM
Go read my second reply in your other thread thread. Then, if you must go this route, go for the tan truck. Cheaper, gas, less miles, and doesn't have the worthless 6.5 diesel.

TWUllc
08-19-2006, 07:38 PM
Go read my second reply in your other thread thread.
Agreed.

Let me ask you this. Why do you need a 3/4Ton pickup? I saw your shed pictures a while back, and all you had was a 48"WB. Start off with a lower priced, low mile truck, like an S10 or Ranger, until you NEED the larger truck.

The only reason I say that is from experience. My old S10 worked wonders for me when I first started. Just have a V6. Those trucks you're looking at will be great, until they don't start or run.

mcwlandscaping
08-19-2006, 08:10 PM
Agreed.

Let me ask you this. Why do you need a 3/4Ton pickup? I saw your shed pictures a while back, and all you had was a 48"WB. Start off with a lower priced, low mile truck, like an S10 or Ranger, until you NEED the larger truck.

The only reason I say that is from experience. My old S10 worked wonders for me when I first started. Just have a V6. Those trucks you're looking at will be great, until they don't start or run.
Im plowing and im putting a dump insert in the back, i don't just do mowing the majority of my work is landscape maintenance and new landscapes and hardscapes

mcwlandscaping
08-19-2006, 08:13 PM
Go read my second reply in your other thread thread. Then, if you must go this route, go for the tan truck. Cheaper, gas, less miles, and doesn't have the worthless 6.5 diesel.
i don't want to make it so dad has to find another vehicle for himself. Even though he's the one that said we could do that, i know he'd sell himself short and get something he really didn't want to just to save money and i really would feel like a total azz doing that. Its best for both of us if i get a truck

mcwlandscaping
08-19-2006, 08:14 PM
the tan gasser is nice. 6.5 diesel is one of the worst diesels ever.
my thoughts as well........i like the tan one, ill be looking at it tomarrow or early next week!

Scag48
08-19-2006, 08:18 PM
Sorry to bust your bubble man, and don't take this wrong way man because I was your age once. I'm 20 now, and I wanted all the landscaping business when I was 16, but it never happened. Focus on mowing, it's the most money you can make for a kid your age. Trust me dude, I've been there. I got into landscaping when the time was right and from there I got into excavation. At 16, the lawn maintenance is a big undertaking, don't try to take on the whole world. There's alot more money to be made in mowing for a kid your age than landscaping. Focus on getting a lawn empire built by buying the right trucks and equipment, don't get yourself spread out buying equipment for multiple divisions when you should just be focusing on one at this point. Do one thing well first, then expand from there. Once you have the lawn maintenance thing hammered down, a good customer base and a steady income, then extend yourself into other lines of service. Right now, you're trying to do it all. What happens if you get into the landscaping market and the demand goes soft? Get the lawn business extremely well structured and steady, then when you're ready to take on a new challenge you can afford to make some mistakes because they will happen, believe me on that. There will come a time where you screw something up or something comes along that is going to cost you out your @$$ and if you don't have that steady income from your lawn customers, you're outta biz bro.

Like I said, I'm not trying to shut you down because that always pissed me off too, people telling me I couldn't do stuff and I ended up proving them wrong, I'm just trying to help you out because I've been through it.

LindblomRJ
08-19-2006, 08:50 PM
Go with the tan one. Stay away from the diesel. Headaches and repairs are expensive.

Gravel Rat
08-19-2006, 09:02 PM
The 6.5 isn't bad if the maintenance is kept up it gets decent fuel mileage and works fine in a 3/4 ton P/U. The only way I would buy one in a higher mileage truck is with records on what has been done to the engine. The injection pumps on the 6.5s were not that great and expensive.

Myself I don't buy Chevs only Ford trucks for me :canadaflag:

You have to watch Chevy 3/4 tons you want the heavy duty version which has the 14 Bolt Full float rear axle the lighter gvw truck has a semi floater rear axle. If you plan on putting any weight in the truck you want the heavier rear axle (Full Floater).

If the truck has a 454 for power it will have a healthy appetite for gas but it has the power you need. Just every time you tromp on the power there goes 5 gallons of gas and the gas gauge needle drops.

For a newbie I would stick with a gas pot you may not want to buy a diesel if you never had experience with the 6.5 or if your not mechanically inclined.

ALarsh
08-19-2006, 09:02 PM
Sorry to bust your bubble man, and don't take this wrong way man because I was your age once. I'm 20 now, and I wanted all the landscaping business when I was 16, but it never happened. Focus on mowing, it's the most money you can make for a kid your age. Trust me dude, I've been there. I got into landscaping when the time was right and from there I got into excavation. At 16, the lawn maintenance is a big undertaking, don't try to take on the whole world. There's alot more money to be made in mowing for a kid your age than landscaping. Focus on getting a lawn empire built by buying the right trucks and equipment, don't get yourself spread out buying equipment for multiple divisions when you should just be focusing on one at this point. Do one thing well first, then expand from there. Once you have the lawn maintenance thing hammered down, a good customer base and a steady income, then extend yourself into other lines of service. Right now, you're trying to do it all. What happens if you get into the landscaping market and the demand goes soft? Get the lawn business extremely well structured and steady, then when you're ready to take on a new challenge you can afford to make some mistakes because they will happen, believe me on that. There will come a time where you screw something up or something comes along that is going to cost you out your @$$ and if you don't have that steady income from your lawn customers, you're outta biz bro.

Like I said, I'm not trying to shut you down because that always pissed me off too, people telling me I couldn't do stuff and I ended up proving them wrong, I'm just trying to help you out because I've been through it.
Great advice and I would have to agree with it. I sub out all my landscape/hardscape work to a local guy. He gives me a price discount, I tell the client how I work that side of my business and they agree. I take a small amount home for doing some paper work. I haven't invested a bunch of money into equipment I would use 2-5 times a year and while it depreciates.

Good luck.

Howie's Lawn Care
08-19-2006, 09:38 PM
i don't want to make it so dad has to find another vehicle for himself. Even though he's the one that said we could do that, i know he'd sell himself short and get something he really didn't want to just to save money and i really would feel like a total azz doing that. Its best for both of us if i get a truck
He didn't sell himself short when he (maybe your mom or him and your mom) decided on a $1200 vacuum cleaner!:laugh:

mcwlandscaping
08-19-2006, 09:42 PM
He didn't sell himself short when he (maybe your mom or him and your mom) decided on a $1200 vacuum cleaner!:laugh:
LOL HAHAHAHAHAHAHA you should have seen the look on his face when he walked in after work, saw it in the living room, and found out how much it cost!!lol, priceless facial expression!

Howie's Lawn Care
08-19-2006, 09:44 PM
By the way, screw getting a dump trailer. You should get a 3/4 since it will be so much more versatile with a dump insert. Can the front end of a suburban handle a plow that well. I don't know much about plowing, but I thought they were hard on the front ends. I also remember someone on here paying like 7K for a 7' X 14' dump trailer. Why not get a $5K truck and $2.5K dump insert? It's nice to be able to throw stuff in a truck bed anyways. I like your idea of getting a 3/4 ton and dump insert, atleast in opposition to getting a suburban.

Howie's Lawn Care
08-19-2006, 09:49 PM
People also said to take the Suburban and sell it, but I would feel bad taking a nice solid vehicle and turning around to sell it. I wasn't expecting you to do that, but I'm just using that as a reason to get a 3/4 ton. How much do you think the size of dump trailer you want would cost? What happened to the red 2500 you posted pics of? I also think a truck would be more professional. You could put some sideboards on a dump insert with your logo.

mcwlandscaping
08-19-2006, 10:10 PM
that red truck, i went to look at yesturday, dealer tried to hide all the frame rust with black spray paint so, that's not an option anymore. Ive always wanted the dump insert, the mention of the dump trailer was for only if i got the suburban. Ide get a Downeaster 8ft version w/ tarp roller and cab protector for $2645 installed. Howies lawn care, i totally agree with what you are saying

mrusk
08-19-2006, 10:47 PM
Ok Scag gave his advice and now i will give mine. I am 20. I been around the block.

In this changing world, with the rising gas prices, i would buy the smallest truck that could tow the equipment you have now most efficently! You do not need a 3/4 ton pickup and a $2600 dollor dump insert at 16!!!! Get your supplies delivered!!! I do big hardscape project. All my stuff gets delivered, down to a yard of top soil!!

Once you spend 2600 on a insert, and take into consideration the extra time it takes to pick stuff up, the wear and tear and the truck, and your really bad gas mileage, it makes no sense to pick up your stuff.

If i was you i'd try to find a f150 with the inline 6 engine. They are bulletproof and run for ever. Run the f150 for a couple of years doing just lawns and mulch etc. Once you get out of school buy a bigger truck and than go into hardscaping etc.


Feel free to PM me with any questions.
Matt

Scag48
08-20-2006, 12:21 AM
Oh yeah, totally forgot about the dump insert. Dude you're just trying to take it all on too fast. You'll drop $7K into a truck with a dump insert, that would be a TERRIBLE investment at this point. Most of the landscaping you'd actually be capable of doing at your age wouldn't require a dump insert and if you need materials just have them delivered on the customer's dime. For landscaping, I suggest all you try to do is plant plants, install mulch, plant some trees, maybe do a little stone work, NOTHING MORE right now. If you try to take on too much it's possible you're going to get slapped in the face by a mistake that will cost you money or you're going to realize you're in too deep. Like I said man, not trying to hack you down, you just gotta realize that you're buying all the equipment before the business, I know exactly how that goes, I used to do the same thing. Big dreamin' is fine and good, but just do yourself a favor and kick some @$$ mowing lawns and light landscaping, you gotta get off this landscaping thing it'll ruin you man, there's a lot more to it than you think.

mcwlandscaping
08-20-2006, 12:46 AM
landscaping is where the money is, not in lawns, you need to have 120+ lawns that being a resi/comm mix before you can make any decent money off of mowing lawns. having stuff delivered is a royal pita, even when james (other LS member) does it, just because you have to arrange a time to meet and everything like that. SO much easier to do as much as possible yourself. You charge the customer your time and gas to go pick up materials and to take stuff away. I can make money off lawns right now because im too young to be a registered and insured company, but im not going to build up the business in lawns just so when im 18 and paying all the taxes and insurance i have to haul azz to get landscaping jobs to make money to pay for all that and still make actually pay myself.

my next landscape/hardscape job ive got lined up, i could almost buy that tan truck with the amount of money involved and that's after materials cost

ALarsh
08-20-2006, 12:56 AM
landscaping is where the money is, not in lawns, you need to have 120+ lawns that being a resi/comm mix before you can make any decent money off of mowing lawns. having stuff delivered is a royal pita, even when james (other LS member) does it, just because you have to arrange a time to meet and everything like that. SO much easier to do as much as possible yourself. You charge the customer your time and gas to go pick up materials and to take stuff away. I can make money off lawns right now because im too young to be a registered and insured company, but im not going to build up the business in lawns just so when im 18 and paying all the taxes and insurance i have to haul azz to get landscaping jobs to make money to pay for all that and still make actually pay myself.
I think that is where you are not seeing the light. Lawns are a weekly income, you will have work to do every week, now and in 3 months. Landscaping isn't. You can make some good money landscaping, but you have to have the expensive equipment to really make out like a bandit (backhoes, large dump trucks, etc etc).

Here is a quote from justmowit about landscaping vs. mowing income:
I agree to net $200K on 2M sales sounds about right if you are doing landscaping, hardscape, fertilizing etc. , since so much of those gross sales dollars go to materials, managers, supervisors, plants, expensive heavy duty trucks, etc..... That is why large landscape companies have such huge sales figures 5, 6,7, 10 Million annually, but net dollars is only 10 or 11%.

This same math does not apply to companies who only mow, net dollars is about twice that on poorly run operations and 3 times that on well run operations that watch expenses

Gross, money is there. Net, I don't know.......

qualitylawnmanagement
08-20-2006, 12:58 AM
Get at least a 3/4 ton truck if you plan to do plowing and hauling heavy loads. Also if you were smart get a dump trailer, load the trailer up with mulch or stone and drop it off at the job site with a couple of guys. This way you aren't tying up a truck. You can drop them off and you can do other misc jobs or doing you lawn maintenance and then when they are done have them call you and pick them up. This is what I plan to do next season.

mcwlandscaping
08-20-2006, 01:05 AM
yup, dump insert for now so i can also tow an equipment trailer too. But once i start hiring more guys, and adding another truck, a dump trailer will follow soon after

Scag48
08-20-2006, 05:29 AM
Dude I really hate to tell you but you're really in for a big hurt. Sorry man, you're 16 and you have more of an attitude than I had. I'm just trying to offer you some advice but you'll learn it the hard way.

Here's some simple numbers for you to crunch. Lawn maintenance pays around $60 an hour out here for a reliable, well established company. I was making $60 an hour with about $7K worth of brand new equipment, I bought nothing used. I spent more on a truck, all together I had about $18K riding around mowing lawns. Now a truck can be had for about $5K easily, I just spent a little more because my work truck was my personal truck and I wanted something fairly nice. Now, not counting the truck, $7K worth of equipment produced $60 an hour. When we got into landscaping, and we have it good for skid steer hourly rates out here, you gotta drop $20K for a new skid steer to get to about $75 an hour. You could buy used, but we're comparing new lawn equipment to new landscaping equipment. Then you have to buy a decent sized truck and a big trailer to haul it around, I won't even get into those numbers, that's just part of the biz, but actual billable hours the mowing route made me more money for less investment. Now let's see what makes more steady income for less investment. Do the math. Mowing isn't a glamor job, nobody ever said it was, but if you manage it right there's potential for big money.

I'm just having a really hard time believing that anyone is going to put big money on a kid doing landscape/hardscape jobs who isn't insured, licensed, or bonded. I can speak from experience on this one, I'VE BEEN THERE. There's so much more to the business than you can even comprehend, especially when you think you need 120 lawns to make any money. I know guys that had 60-80 lawn accounts grossing $120K a year, pretty good money for cutting grass. And getting materials delivered? Not a big deal. If you're really in the landscaping business, no fooling around BS with $3K jobs, would you rather be wasting your time driving to and from the jobsite hauling 3 yards of material at a time for $40 an hour to cover your hauling costs or staying on site with your crew billing $70 an hour for your time? You just don't have it figured out yet, management is absolutely key in this business, forget the equipment because ANYBODY can go buy the equipment. It takes someone smarter to buy the equipment and put it to use effectively, all you want to do is buy the toys and pretend you're a big shot. Efficiency and logistical decisions are what make you or break you. You bid a job and miscalculate the quantity of material. Who pays for it? Not the customer, it comes out of your net profit for the job. Do that enough and you've just worked for free. Lawn maintenance that doesn't happen, there's NEVER a negative day in the lawn business unless you toast a mower or something disasterous.

Do as you please, far be it for me to stop you. But when it's all said and done you'll be out of high school wondering why you're still in this game when you could be at college. You have a lot to learn and by god it'll teach you. I can give you credit for jumping into this stuff, I did, but you will pay a price at some point, make no mistake about that.

Tony Clifton
08-20-2006, 09:56 AM
MCW, if landscaping is what you enjoy doing, then do it. Really, the only equipment you need is a shovel, a rake, and a wheelbarrow. That is much less of an investment than is required for maintenance. If you need a skid steer, rent one,,,need a mortar mixer rent one, etc. As far as the truck is concerned, the gold one seems like a good deal, I would recommend a 3/4 ton any day. The repairs are a bit more expensive, but you are better off with a 3/4 ton than you are overloading a 1/2 ton and wearing it out quicker.
Now for the dump insert, (I will play devil's advocate here) What are you really planning on using it for? Mulch? Why do you need an insert for mulch? I think that an insert could come in handy, but you really don't need one. I never had one when I worked alone. Can't you use the bed of your truck in combo with the trailer you use for your maint. equipment to haul trash etc. Also, I would not recommend a dump trailer,,,in a way that is an ignorant statement because I have never owned one of those either. I just dont think they are worth the money. If you actually need a dump trailer, then get a dump truck, that way you can pull a trailer with it to haul your skid steer, chipper, trees or whatever.

stuffdeer
08-20-2006, 10:33 AM
Really...If all your doing it Getting mulch in your Dump, Why not just use the truck as Tony Clifton Said.

I mean, Sure, you can load pavers and such into your truck, but you still have to unload them manually, and in a case like this, A dump wouldn't matter, as you can't dump pavers out the back of your truck.

mrusk
08-20-2006, 11:02 AM
You can make ALOT of money cutting grass!!! You do not need 120 lawns to make a killing.

MCW we are trying to help you out, since we have been there before. When i was 17 i decided to start mowing lawns. Dad rushed out and bought me a exmark 60in lazer liquid cooled (which i paided him the 9k back). When i turned i formed a legal business bought a 32k 3/4 ton and a 18 ft enclosed trailer. Now i was 18 years old going down the road with almost 50k worth of equipment cutting grass. I could of made alot more money if i had 1/3 of the overhead.

Getting deliveries is not a PITA. Even though i am only 20 all my supplier know i am the real deal. I just make a call and my supplies are there when i want them, even if i am not on the job site. The point i am trying to make is i do BIG projects and it does not make financial sense to pickup materials. I can't understand how you can think the 2600 dollor dump insert will make you money.

To many people let their egos run their business. Wait till you guys see how i am going to run my company as i grow. I am forgetting the way other hardsape design/build companies do things (equipment, trucks, labor, managment) and coming up with my own more efficent, cost effective system.

Matt

ALarsh
08-20-2006, 11:03 AM
JMHO, dump inserts are pretty useless. Pay $2,500 so you can dump 2-3 yards of mulch. Such a little amount of material you would have to make 7 trips to do a 20 yard mulch job (typical job). At the expensive of gas, maintenance and time = useless. Last time I checked, it cost $15 to get it delivered here depending on how close they are to you. Pay them by credit card, you don't have to be there. Show up on the jobsite with your workers and get working right away. Brainless to me, but its your decision.

mrusk
08-20-2006, 11:13 AM
With a dump insert in a 3/4 ton can you even haul a yard of top soil or stone LEGALLY?

craftsmanlover
08-20-2006, 01:35 PM
why get a truck when u could use a bike with a small trailer one it saves gas. two u get exercise instead of driving a truck and getting fat. three u can take the trailer off and have fun.

FearThisDeere
08-20-2006, 01:57 PM
Don't get the diesel. I drove by that place and popped in to see what they had. That truck is junk. There are many reasons why it is priced the way it is. Go for the tan one. That looks like a good truck.

mcwlandscaping
08-20-2006, 04:26 PM
Well boys, just got home, i bought the tan truck. Beautiful condition, paid $4500 for it. It drove great, ran great, and everything on it worked perfectly!!!! guy that sold it was really cool too! Can't wait to get it home tomarrow!!!!

qualitylawnmanagement
08-20-2006, 06:54 PM
Well boys, just got home, i bought the tan truck. Beautiful condition, paid $4500 for it. It drove great, ran great, and everything on it worked perfectly!!!! guy that sold it was really cool too! Can't wait to get it home tomarrow!!!!

Good luck with your new truck mike. But if I were you I wouldn't get a dump insert. How often would you going to use it? That is 800lbs of stuff you can't get in your truck. Just go and get a dump trailer. Works like a dream. I use my buddy's 14ft ez-dumper trailer and can get alot of mulch in there and just drop the trailer of at the job site with a couple of guys and you can go do the easy work or even prep another job. A dump insert is great if you are bagging leaves or grass alot of the times, but that is the only thing I could use it for here. But hey it's your money. Good luck with the new truck.

Jamesgateslandscaping
08-20-2006, 07:33 PM
Lawn maintenance that doesn't happen, there's NEVER a negative day in the lawn business unless you toast a mower or something disasterous.
Never a negative day? Anytime something breaks it becomes negative. Anytime it rains it becomes negitive, I could keep going on and on. Yes, there is less capital equipment cost in the start up of a lawn care business, yes it has GREAT cash flow, but you will never make the money in it. The money is in full service companys. The cash flow is great with lawns because it finances other aspects of the company and allows you to grow. Mike has the ambition to do this work and works very well, he just helped out on a wall job we did down the street from his house so he could learn the hardscape side of the business. Last year I spent the year building up my mow crew, this year it was my construction crew the money went towards. Yes it can be easier to have materials delivered, but not every yard can cater to you. Mike is not looking to take out loans and do all this crazy stuff, he is paying cash for his equipment and that is the way to go. We try to pay cash for most of out equipment (anything below $10k) so we dont have this small debt. There is no reason you guys should be bashing him for his decisions, hes looking for advice, not to be critisized. He is slowing building an empire IMO. You need to take steps for the future if you want to grow and he is doing it at a young age. Yes he is only doing maintence but someday will be up to the large construction projects, it does take a few years.
Yes, Scag does make many valid points but some are not very valid. You do need to build up a good deal of lawn accounts (which mike is doing just fine right now) to really get the good cash flow into the company. With one maintance account and a yard sign in front of the house, It got me 2 jobs worth $30k, 2 new lawn accounts and 2 new plow accounts.
It took my company a few years to build up the construction part of the company and now I am starting to sign work for next year. We have been booking for a very long time in hardscape and planting projects for this season and there is a good chance I will be working until january this year by the time Im done with this season (not including plowing).
There is money in EVERY aspect of this business, it just depends of how you approach it. I did not want to be just a straight mow and go company, I wanted to offer everything and that is what we do. We have doubled in size every year and I have been trying to slow growth but it just doesnt seem to help. Within the next 2-3 years we will be one of the larger construction and maintance companies in the area. We are constintly complemented on our work, work ethics and out equipment. Mike is doing just fine for his age, better than I was then. It will take time but he is building for the future, not today.
James

craftsmanlover
08-20-2006, 08:49 PM
Sorry to bust your bubble man, and don't take this wrong way man because I was your age once. I'm 20 now, and I wanted all the landscaping business when I was 16, but it never happened. Focus on mowing, it's the most money you can make for a kid your age. Trust me dude, I've been there. I got into landscaping when the time was right and from there I got into excavation. At 16, the lawn maintenance is a big undertaking, don't try to take on the whole world. There's alot more money to be made in mowing for a kid your age than landscaping. Focus on getting a lawn empire built by buying the right trucks and equipment, don't get yourself spread out buying equipment for multiple divisions when you should just be focusing on one at this point. Do one thing well first, then expand from there. Once you have the lawn maintenance thing hammered down, a good customer base and a steady income, then extend yourself into other lines of service. Right now, you're trying to do it all. What happens if you get into the landscaping market and the demand goes soft? Get the lawn business extremely well structured and steady, then when you're ready to take on a new challenge you can afford to make some mistakes because they will happen, believe me on that. There will come a time where you screw something up or something comes along that is going to cost you out your @$$ and if you don't have that steady income from your lawn customers, you're outta biz bro.

Like I said, I'm not trying to shut you down because that always pissed me off too, people telling me I couldn't do stuff and I ended up proving them wrong, I'm just trying to help you out because I've been through it.
hey scag 48 no one wants to hear your worthless thoughts just answer the d@mn quistion. i bet MCW is saying the same thing in his mind but he got his truck next time do so.

murray83
08-20-2006, 09:04 PM
just wondering why his comments are useless? they seem very well thought out and he has the experience good and bad to back them up.

scag found out the hard way sadly going big too fast can sink you in other posts and is just simply warning this guy as whats to come possibly.

none the less i think the dump insert is a bad idea,save that money and invest in the dump trailer its better in the long run.

mcwlandscaping
08-20-2006, 09:09 PM
im waiting on the dump insert till spring so i can think it over durring the winter and see how business will pan out for next year before i make my final choice between dump insert and dump trailer.

DBL
08-20-2006, 09:15 PM
i skipped the middle couple pages but any leads on a truck

LindblomRJ
08-20-2006, 09:35 PM
just wondering why his comments are useless? they seem very well thought out and he has the experience good and bad to back them up.

scag found out the hard way sadly going big too fast can sink you in other posts and is just simply warning this guy as whats to come possibly.


Well put. I thought the purpose was to share thoughts and idea. Its up to you if you want to agree or dis-agree. His comments are based on his experience. He gave an honest assessment.

TWUllc
08-20-2006, 11:34 PM
Well boys, just got home, i bought the tan truck. Beautiful condition, paid $4500 for it. It drove great, ran great, and everything on it worked perfectly!!!! guy that sold it was really cool too! Can't wait to get it home tomarrow!!!!

106,00 miles. "Unless the vehicle has a remaining factory warranty, all sales are "AS-IS" with no warranty."

Best of luck sport.

TWUllc
08-20-2006, 11:37 PM
. Yes, there is less capital equipment cost in the start up of a lawn care business, yes it has GREAT cash flow, but you will never make the money in it.

Never say never.....

mike lane lawn care
08-20-2006, 11:45 PM
good job, i see you have found a nice looking truck to suit your needs. congrats!
I'm not a big fan of that body style, but it's just appearances andjust my opinion
Be easy on her and she will last a long time.

Best of Luck

Scag48
08-20-2006, 11:51 PM
I'm just trying to help the kid out, my old man and I got in too deep with our excavation business and luckily we were able to sell the equipment and get out without losing our shirts. I've been there boys, don't tell me I haven't. I've taken advice from guys on here, looked at my options, and realized keeping the excavation division going at this point in my life would be a sanity killer. We decided to streamline our landscaping division and not get ourselves stretched out. So, I'l state again, I've been overextended and know what it's about. You'll know when you get there, not a good feeling. I never said don't take a risk, but don't go out and blow a wad on trucks, dump inserts, and dump trailers before you have the business to support. I never told the kid not to give the landscaping deal a shot, it's a real wild card for a 16 year old kid, no hard feelings man but I wouldn't hire a 16 year old kid to do any serious landscaping on my house, but if you can get the business go for it. But buy equipment as you need it, not before you have the work to justify. THat's all my original advice to you is. If you can make it work, do it, but buying all your equipment before you have the work and at 16 no less is just absolutely crazy.

Don't get me wrong, I wish you the best of luck man, truly I do. But if you aren't careful about your purchases you will get sunk. We had a brand new Cat 312 and a 277B that were busy making money every day and we had to let them go just because the logistics of running the business didn't make sense for us at this point. We were turning a good profit, had business coming down the wire, and we still had to let it go. Lesson? Just because you're making money doesn't mean what you're doing makes sense. Some times you have to step back, take a look at what you're doing, and ask yourself if this is the right route to go. It isn't always about the money, your sanity is worth something as well. That's all I'm trying to say. I wish you the best of luck and I hope you take a little of what I've said to heart because I've struggled through this business for years and have had first hand success and failure in lawn maintenance, landscaping, hardscaping, excavation, general construction, a bunch of different walks of the business.

J&R Landscaping
08-21-2006, 12:33 AM
The tan truck looks nice. I have heard so many bad reports about the gm 6.5 it aint even funny. I look right past them! Good luck with the new truck! I would definitly invest in some timbrens if you plan on plowing and having a dump insert.

South Florida Lawns
08-21-2006, 01:13 AM
Wow you should have gotten an s10 or ranger those are the real trucks.

3/4 ton, thats too many tons there, what were you thinking?:dizzy: :dizzy:

BTW get a dump insert and a dump trailer, with a dump insert in the dump trailer. Then you will be cool but not quite as "kewl" as me and my 6 cylinder 1/2 ton Chevy on dubs:laugh: .

ALarsh
08-21-2006, 01:14 AM
Don't get me wrong, I wish you the best of luck man, truly I do. But if you aren't careful about your purchases you will get sunk. We had a brand new Cat 312 and a 277B that were busy making money every day and we had to let them go just because the logistics of running the business didn't make sense for us at this point. We were turning a good profit, had business coming down the wire, and we still had to let it go. Lesson? Just because you're making money doesn't mean what you're doing makes sense. Some times you have to step back, take a look at what you're doing, and ask yourself if this is the right route to go. It isn't always about the money, your sanity is worth something as well. That's all I'm trying to say. I wish you the best of luck and I hope you take a little of what I've said to heart because I've struggled through this business for years and have had first hand success and failure in lawn maintenance, landscaping, hardscaping, excavation, general construction, a bunch of different walks of the business.
Good post but wasn't it because of dads mistake in buying a $750,000 house?

Scag48
08-21-2006, 01:33 AM
ALarsh, the house didn't help things at all, but we realized that me going to college trying to run the business come next spring would be a nightmare as my old man didn't want to get his CDL or pony up for a dump truck. I need to wait until I'm done with school and tackle it on my own. I didn't see it before but the picture is crystal clear now. Honestly, probably my fault for thinking it would work instead of taking a stand since the beginning and talking some reason into my old man, but he had this crazy idea and I didn't want to let him down so I jumped into the mess. We made it work short term, but long term it just wouldn't be the way to go. The last 2 good weeks I was having fun, but it started to get a little stressful. Just as easy to call it off for now, then I can give it hell when I'm out of school.

mrusk
08-21-2006, 11:17 PM
"Supply yards can't always cater to you"

Yes they can. If one yard does not give you the attention you deserve find another. I get all my supplies delivered when i want. Sometimes it might take alittle planning (like 5 minutes on the cell phone) but i always get my material when i need it.

Unless your running 5 crews, it does not make any sense to do your own deliveries.

Matt