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View Full Version : Cuts in a soldier borbered walk


forestfireguy
08-25-2006, 09:27 PM
How do you make your cuts on a curved walk, do you lay your soldiers and mark and cut each piece inside the field or do you leave the soldiers out, run the field into the border area and mark off your eding with a quickdraw and make a demo saw cut?

paponte
08-26-2006, 07:43 AM
Both. Really depends on the individual project, and pattern.

forestfireguy
08-26-2006, 08:54 AM
What factors come into consideration for you when deciding how to make these cuts? Same ? for a sttraight run.

YardPro
08-26-2006, 09:05 AM
it depends on how long it is and how sharp of a curve it is.

for longer curves we leave out the soldiers and overlay the pavers (lay into the space where the soldiers are). we then scribe along the pavers and use a gas cutoff saw and cut the overlay.

this is WAY faster than marking and cutting each individual piece.

same goes for straight lines.........

GroundScapesIncorporated
08-29-2006, 11:22 PM
it depends on how long it is and how sharp of a curve it is.

for longer curves we leave out the soldiers and overlay the pavers (lay into the space where the soldiers are). we then scribe along the pavers and use a gas cutoff saw and cut the overlay.

this is WAY faster than marking and cutting each individual piece.

same goes for straight lines.........


Your right, it is faster.

But PERSONAlLLY, with the work ive seen and done. The job has always looked nicer when the pavers were individually PU and took to the saw and cut.
I just personally have never seen someone take a cut off saw and make perfect cuts all the way down.

cgland
08-30-2006, 03:08 PM
These cuts were made with the overlay method. I don't see how you can say that the other way is better.:dizzy:

Chris

PerfiCut L&L
08-30-2006, 04:41 PM
cgland - thats a nice cut line. I'm going to try that method on our next project, as ive been wanting to for a while now. How difficult is it when your cutting just a small sliver of stone?

forestfireguy
08-30-2006, 07:19 PM
If there is to be a sliver I leave them out and cut on the wet saw. I just finished a walkway today and used the " overlay" method. I took my time, scored dry and cut wet I notice the saw likes an outside radius better that cutting the inside, I knicked a few, I guess i tried to go too tight, so I ended up cutting maybe a dozen on the wetsaw as opposed to at least a hundred. Definite time saver.

GroundScapesIncorporated
08-30-2006, 09:46 PM
These cuts were made with the overlay method. I don't see how you can say that the other way is better.:dizzy:

Chris


Chris,
Chris your right those are some very nice cuts. What kind of saw was used? Did you install edge restraint before or after pavers?

Oh, and I never said the other way was better.

mrusk
08-30-2006, 09:58 PM
The thing is, the first time you cut in place it won't come out the greatest. It takes time and experience to get the cuts that CG had in his pictures. I remember the first time i cut in place. I kept on thinking that it must be the hack way since it didn't look to good. Now, the quality of curves i cut really impresses me and eveyrone else that sees them.

Matt

Drafto
08-30-2006, 10:02 PM
These cuts were made with the overlay method. I don't see how you can say that the other way is better.:dizzy:

Chris

The overlay is the only way to go, nice cuts Chris. You can see from a mile away who puts the restraint down before they make cuts. Honestly, it is almost impossible to get the edge restraint down straight without butting it up to the pavers. Chris, in the future, maybe you should return your business phone calls before you play on the internet.

Dan

lawnkid
08-30-2006, 11:53 PM
I am working on a small patio right now with a couple curves. I am also frustrated at this point with my soldier course and cutting these Unilock Brussels XL-Units as a soldier course. I overlaid everything and cut with my Partner cut off where I want my soldier course to butt up to the pavers but I am having trouble cutting the right amounts off the pavers. Is there any math involved that makes this easier or is it kinda a guessing game that with experience you get better at it by laying the pavers up to the cut and then over the adjacent paver and marking. Attached is a paint drawing of the patio I am installing. How should I cut the pavers being pointed to with the red arrow? I have only done 5 patios in my life and all were relatively square or rectangle. Can someone explain how to do so. I got about half way around the first curve and everything is tight but that's after about an hour of screwing around and trying to measure by overlapping and marking with a pencil and then using the cut off to sizeum up.

lawnkid
08-31-2006, 12:00 AM
Sorry here is the pic I am referring to:

Drafto
08-31-2006, 08:45 AM
Sorry here is the pic I am referring to:

Use a square and transfer the angle from one paver to the next. I will see if I can post a pic.

Dan

hollywood
09-06-2006, 09:17 PM
If there is to be a sliver I leave them out and cut on the wet saw. I just finished a walkway today and used the " overlay" method. I took my time, scored dry and cut wet I notice the saw likes an outside radius better that cutting the inside, I knicked a few, I guess i tried to go too tight, so I ended up cutting maybe a dozen on the wetsaw as opposed to at least a hundred. Definite time saver.




I agree. There are times when it seems dificult not to mark the pavers in the laying field especially when using a 14'' blade. I just pull out any pavers and cut them with a chop saw if they cannot be cut cleanly enough with the cutoff saw. As a rule though overlaying is the most efficient way for me to lay.

BlazinLandscaping
10-11-2006, 09:42 PM
Rusk your first problem is you think you know everything about the landscaping industry, when in fact you know nothing. Secondly, spending 2 months at the same job is pointless you make absolutly no money spending so much time at one job. And the last thing is your not going to get business by telling people that they have to take a look at your job and not giving them an estimate. We could do circles around you and your mexican.
P.S. - Stop asking John and the rest of the world nonsense questions about plants and whatever else you don't know about. :hammerhead:

OUTLANDER
02-26-2008, 03:38 PM
i agree as far as looking alot better,but i'm just as good cutting individaully(just not as efficient)BUT!!.........i really worry when doing this overlay method about disturbing the bedding sand,and worse yet the compacted base.sure it can be replaced,but soundly as the 1st time.....i dont know

BDisselHardscape
02-26-2008, 04:42 PM
Cutting in place with a gas cut off saw is the way to go, even if your not that great at it, wheather the cut is great or less then great it is at least consistant so can can form an illusion of a good cut just by having that consistant line. Removing and cutting individual pavers runs the risk of a jagged line from a mis marked paver. No doubt it takes sometime and a real good hand to get a ice line. Nice pic.

jreiff
02-26-2008, 06:00 PM
What is everyone doing to lay out there curves? Making sure that they are smooth?

tcalb2
02-26-2008, 06:38 PM
This is a picture of some soilder course cuts I had to do as well as some cuts around a circle package. I do these one at a time. It takes forever, I'm just too afraid to try it with the cut off saw. I don't think I'd be able to get as good results using the cut off saw until I got comfortable with it. I end up using a Mk101 and then finish with a 3.5 grinding wheel to make the cuts curve. Good luck either way it takes time to make it look nice.

cleancutccl
02-26-2008, 08:26 PM
usually what we do is put a 12" blade in the ts700. Thinking about gett a cart b/c that saw gets HEAVY. Has anyone used a regular 7 1/4" circular saw for really curvy patios, how did it work?

landstyles
02-26-2008, 08:30 PM
We always overlay and score with quickcut, then cut in place.
Much quicker and cleaner looking. The only time I'd lift and cut would be on a straight line.

JUGA1177
02-26-2008, 08:43 PM
Cut in place is the best way.

jbailey52
02-26-2008, 09:35 PM
Ive never cut in place with out demo saw... I just cant conceive how the pavers, even with there being an over lay to the outside of the ones you are cutting, dont jump around or move while being cut on the ground? Is there a prep I am missing that needs to be done first? Thanks

JUGA1177
02-26-2008, 09:52 PM
I always over lay and cut the bricks dont move just take your time.

JUGA1177
02-26-2008, 10:03 PM
You can see the cuts in my pic's and cut with 14" chop saw.

jbailey52
02-26-2008, 11:09 PM
When your overlaying, to mark your curves, are you drawing them on the brick first with soap stone or anything, or just freehand scribe with the saw? Thanks.

landstyles
02-26-2008, 11:25 PM
I do a quick sketch with soap stone for guidance, then score it. I make two passes. The first pass is about 2/3 deep then the second pass is all the way through. This way keeps minimal movement of pavers

earthly
02-27-2008, 02:42 AM
if you have a tight curve can you still use your 14" cut off saw or do you use somthing smaller, i find it hard to do a fairly tight curve with such a large blade. is there a trick or do you use a smaller saw. i once had a landscaper tell me that he used a small handheld grinder with a diamond blade. do you think he could make tighter curves with it because of the small blade?

JUGA1177
02-27-2008, 04:27 AM
I lay all the border first then I use the saw(14") to cut only 1/4 inch into the brick for guide in the tight curves too ONLY 1/4" then I cut evrything and leave the curves for last.
When you cut the tight areas just remove each brick and cut(already marked whit the saw)that way you have a nice clean border cuts.

Hope helps.

neversatisfiedj
02-27-2008, 08:39 AM
You guys have monster gaps in your curved soldiers. Anyhow I overlay and mark then score with TS400. Then I Lift each paver out and complete the cut. Simple.

tcalb2
02-27-2008, 08:45 AM
Do you guys who use the cut off saw to make the curves, rough the saw cut edge up after. To make it look like a factory edge? I don't know if this is common practice, but thats how I do mine after I cut each individually. I rough up the edge to make it look like a factory tumbled edge. It this isn't a common practice maybe I'll save some time and leave this part out.

McKeeLand
02-27-2008, 09:52 AM
1. you cant install ur edging first if ur going to overlay, which is a waste of time anyway. 2. you need to have a good overdig, we do 12" on every walk and patio. run ur pavers well past the point where they are going to be cut, this ensures that they will not walk when u are cutting. 3. like others have said. score first 1/4" of so to mark the radius. 4. make ur final cut with a 12" blade only going just far enough to cut the pavers. dont cut into the sand it will kill ur blade life. mark the side of hte blade with a sharpie if u need to. 5. pickup and cut the pavers that cannot be cut in place right there on top of a scrape paver.

jbailey52
02-27-2008, 10:20 AM
I have yet to cut in place, and that has been my biggest concern, cutting into the sand and subbase.

Total Landscape Solutions
02-27-2008, 11:49 AM
I tried this a couple of times. I had to be doing something wrong if the pics posted in this thread were cut this way.

I always cut my straight lines with a demo saw. I could never figure out how to cut a good curve when the saw blade is straight. It seems the back of the blade would cut into the pattern on an inside curve. If the saw blade is buried more than 1/2" in the paver, how do you turn the saw and make a good clean cut when the blade is straight? The pavers would also move a little and push a little into the sand from the vibration.

Any ideas? Tips?

cleancutccl
02-27-2008, 01:14 PM
Juga, those curves look good but your soldier course looks horrible, you have to cut your soldier course bricks too to make a curver look nice.

Also we use a 12" blade for tight curves and only score the bricks then pick up and cut, everything else we cut all the way through. Like said before use a sharpie and hold it to the depth of the paver you are using on the blade, lightly hit the gas on the saw and you have your depth gauge so that you stay out of the sand.

We always cut dry when cutting in place, for those that cut wet do you have any problems with sand moving or when setting your pavers getting the sand to come up between pavers?

landstyles
02-27-2008, 05:52 PM
Juga....I think your course looks good. Gaps are fine. We do the same thing.. I see some guys cut there course to make it tight. To me I don't like the look. Just my opinion.

JUGA1177
02-27-2008, 06:25 PM
Yes maybe the cuts on the soldier is thr right way but I just dont like the way the looks.
thats way they call soldier course (all the same 4x6 or?) no all diferent shapes on the border.
Just my opinion,.
Thank you.

ChampionLS
02-27-2008, 08:27 PM
Blah blah blah blah blah......................

OK heres the trick. Listen up.

First, Lay your field. Don't try to put the soldier course in first- Most likely you won't keep them parallel and the walkway will look sloppy. I can't imagine eyeballing all those pieces to be custom cut for the field. Thats mad!

After your field is laid, Layout for the soldier course. Use a flexible curve and have several people help you. 1/2" pvc pipe works well. So does fiberglass rod (if you know where to get it) Don't use a magic marker- Once you mark the paver, it's there permanently. Soap stone is too wide and washes off easily. Use a red-lead carpenter's pencil. It writes a fine line in hard wax. It won't wash off quickly when you use your saw, but it will disappear when sweeping your joint sand.

For a very curvy soldier course.. Start up that hand held saw and quickly follow the line- cutting down 1/4". You could cut all the way through, but that makes lots of dust, lots of noise, and a big mess. (Plus the back ache).

After the initial cut, take each paver to the wet saw one by one. You can cut a 6x9 lengthwise in the shape of a banana by making several smaller cuts. The initial cut you made is the one that will be visible- which will have a nice flowing curve. Below that is your hex shaped cuts (which will not be seen)

Some of the other tricks are carving the pavers with your wet saw (must lock the blade). Now when cutting your soldier course.. DO NOT!!! put any of those pie shaped pieces in. Throw that crap out. You want large pieces with perpendicular-to-the-field cuts. I can't tell you how many times I've seen a nice Holland soldier course and at the corner is a sliver 1/2" wide!!!!! IF you need 1/2".. just wiggle each paver down the line and expand the joint 1/16th. Space out 16 pavers and you don't need any sliver!!!!. When you sand everything over, you won't notice that the joints are bigger, but you WILL notice that crappy sliver if you leave it in there.

Also, when doing a soldier course.. sometimes you just cant move things. Then what? Well put two pavers together, and take a small slice off both. Two slightly smaller pavers are less noticeable to the eye than one with a big slice out of it.

Any questions????? :drinkup:

McKeeLand
02-27-2008, 08:30 PM
your telling me this is the preferred look ur after?:dizzy: i'm sorry, it not only looks like crap when u dont cut ur soilder course but its proper construction. when its done in masonry you have mortar holding the brick together, with pavers you don't have mortar only sand, and poly sand wont bind that big of a joint together either. i dont think its the look u prefer but the time it saves that u like.

landstyles
02-28-2008, 07:55 PM
Soap stone is what we always use and we never cut wet....Cutting dry is clean and fast.

jbailey52
02-28-2008, 08:06 PM
Ya know.. on the last couple gentle slopped walkways we did.. we layed our field past the edges.. then right on top layed out the sailor course.. adjusted it for a while, they traced on the inside of the sailor on the pavers.. then cut.. for some reason been having a real hard time tracing right on the pavers with anything.. ie. soapstone, colored pencil.. etcx... seemed to bounce around alot.. expecially on the brick stone tubled pavers.. anyone do it this way? Takes longer but has been working out well for us.. its a lot easier to actually see the curves then just scoring alone

ChampionLS
02-28-2008, 08:41 PM
It's okay for your line to be a little wavy. If your chasing the line with a hand held cut off saw, your cutting your own path. Use the line as a guide only. It gets harder when you have a pattern with lots of little pieces. This is where your better off using a 1/4" fiberglass round rod as as french curve. It's easier to bend and trace than those bulky pavers or pvc pipe.

Tom B.
03-01-2008, 10:54 AM
A carpenters pencil and a can of clear lacquer is by far the easiest way to mark extensive curves. For straight runs we'll use a chalk line and lacquer.

ChampionLS
03-02-2008, 10:34 PM
OMG thats crazy. Just use a red lead carpenters pencil. If you can't find them, look online.

jbailey52
03-02-2008, 11:05 PM
thats what I usually.. but I have to trace the sailor or soldier course I already laid ontop of my pavers.. if not, i found it very hard to draw a free hand curve.. it bounces off all the pavers

zedosix
03-03-2008, 12:59 AM
Blah blah blah blah blah......................

OK heres the trick. Listen up.

First, Lay your field. Don't try to put the soldier course in first- Most likely you won't keep them parallel and the walkway will look sloppy. I can't imagine eyeballing all those pieces to be custom cut for the field. Thats mad!

After your field is laid, Layout for the soldier course. Use a flexible curve and have several people help you. 1/2" pvc pipe works well. So does fiberglass rod (if you know where to get it) Don't use a magic marker- Once you mark the paver, it's there permanently. Soap stone is too wide and washes off easily. Use a red-lead carpenter's pencil. It writes a fine line in hard wax. It won't wash off quickly when you use your saw, but it will disappear when sweeping your joint sand.

For a very curvy soldier course.. Start up that hand held saw and quickly follow the line- cutting down 1/4". You could cut all the way through, but that makes lots of dust, lots of noise, and a big mess. (Plus the back ache).

After the initial cut, take each paver to the wet saw one by one. You can cut a 6x9 lengthwise in the shape of a banana by making several smaller cuts. The initial cut you made is the one that will be visible- which will have a nice flowing curve. Below that is your hex shaped cuts (which will not be seen)

Some of the other tricks are carving the pavers with your wet saw (must lock the blade). Now when cutting your soldier course.. DO NOT!!! put any of those pie shaped pieces in. Throw that crap out. You want large pieces with perpendicular-to-the-field cuts. I can't tell you how many times I've seen a nice Holland soldier course and at the corner is a sliver 1/2" wide!!!!! IF you need 1/2".. just wiggle each paver down the line and expand the joint 1/16th. Space out 16 pavers and you don't need any sliver!!!!. When you sand everything over, you won't notice that the joints are bigger, but you WILL notice that crappy sliver if you leave it in there.

Also, when doing a soldier course.. sometimes you just cant move things. Then what? Well put two pavers together, and take a small slice off both. Two slightly smaller pavers are less noticeable to the eye than one with a big slice out of it.

Any questions????? :drinkup:

Congratulations, you are the only one to make sense out of all the responses on this thread. Only thing you need to do different is pick up 4 stones at a time, why would you only carry one at a time to the saw. :nono: Otherwise you win the big jug of beer.

Tom B.
03-03-2008, 09:37 AM
Champion, I hope you weren't referring to my comment. If you were, you're the one that's crazy.

zedosix
03-03-2008, 10:00 AM
A carpenters pencil and a can of clear lacquer is by far the easiest way to mark extensive curves. For straight runs we'll use a chalk line and lacquer.

You got me, what is the lacquer for.

zedosix
03-03-2008, 10:00 AM
Soap stone is what we always use and we never cut wet....Cutting dry is clean and fast.

And soon to be outlawed!

Majesticman
03-03-2008, 01:06 PM
I know many of you guys are young and invincible but I have an ex partner that developed a lung disease from dry cutting. He is 2 years older then me 54 and is on oxygen daily. He can no longer walk up the stairs of his house. This guy was a pillar of health until 5 years ago. He looks like he is 70 and is skin and bones now.

I might dry cut a block or a couple of bricks here and there but I wear a mask. I will not bend over into a dust field trying to hold my breath. That is crazy. I think the polymeric sand is really going to be a health issue in the future. That stuff will seal your lungs up.

landstyles
03-03-2008, 02:25 PM
Having several employees holding a PCV pipe to make curves is a good thing?

Zedosix...So when will cutting dry be outlawed.
We always cut dry (with masks). Much quicker and nicer result. No stained bricks, no wet grade, no messy wet cutting areas. Also must be nice cutting wet in late fall. But for those who cut wet, good for you. Just my opinion. No hard feelings.

zedosix
03-03-2008, 03:00 PM
Having several employees holding a PCV pipe to make curves is a good thing?

Zedosix...So when will cutting dry be outlawed.
We always cut dry (with masks). Much quicker and nicer result. No stained bricks, no wet grade, no messy wet cutting areas. Also must be nice cutting wet in late fall. But for those who cut wet, good for you. Just my opinion. No hard feelings.

Personally I don't use pvc, I have another method that only requires one man when it comes to marking and cutting.
Cutting dry is already not allowed, most of us just get away with it. That dust you and I are breathing is a direct link to the disease called silicosis, just google it and see for yourself. There is an article out there about a school being closed down because a construction worker cut an opening in a cement wall and the entire school population was sent home and even the next day they withheld classes. A bit of overkill but you get the point.

I would much prefer to cut wet and breathe clean air then cutting dry in the fall on a humid day and smelling dust all day. Plus cutting wet is smoother and more accurate than your way. No hard feelings but you've alot to learn yet.

neversatisfiedj
03-03-2008, 03:54 PM
Zedo - what do you do score them dry then take to a wet saw ?

landstyles
03-03-2008, 04:26 PM
Zedosix.."No hard feelings but you've alot to learn yet"......
OUCH!!....
No hard feelings taken.
So when you are cutting in a long curved course wet, do you have a nice mess to clean up after? Or do you score then carry your block to a table saw?

zedosix
03-03-2008, 04:36 PM
Zedo - what do you do score them dry then take to a wet saw ?

Thats right, then a pile at a time to the saw. Two guys can cut a huge amount of brick soldier. One guy never gets off the saw, the other brings the brick and places the soldier.

zedosix
03-03-2008, 04:39 PM
Zedosix.."No hard feelings but you've alot to learn yet"......
OUCH!!....
No hard feelings taken.
So when you are cutting in a long curved course wet, do you have a nice mess to clean up after? Or do you score then carry your block to a table saw?

We all have alot to learn really, its a great trade to be in, working outdoors and all but that dust man...its just not good.
We don't cut on the ground at all, just score them and bring them to the saw. Read last post.

landstyles
03-03-2008, 05:06 PM
Do you have any close up pics of some curved courses that you've cut?

zedosix
03-03-2008, 05:31 PM
Do you have any close up pics of some curved courses that you've cut?

I have a bunch on my website, maybe not real close but close enough

Baumer
03-03-2008, 07:35 PM
I like pulling my pavers up as well. We overlay our pavers, then we take a piece or many pieces of snap edge and cut out the backs for a curve. Only cut the backs of every other support so it is more rigid. Set the snap edge down the opposite way you would install it so that the flat edge is facing the outer edge of your patio. Just put the snap edge where you want the edge of your soldier to start and you're in there. This way really allows you to play around with your curve and get it the way you want it.

zedosix
03-03-2008, 07:36 PM
I like pulling my pavers up as well. We overlay our pavers, then we take a piece or many pieces of snap edge and cut out the backs for a curve. Only cut the backs of every other support so it is more rigid. Set the snap edge down the opposite way you would install it so that the flat edge is facing the outer edge of your patio. Just put the snap edge where you want the edge of your soldier to start and you're in there. This way really allows you to play around with your curve and get it the way you want it.

That is the same way we do ours, but have you noticed the drop in quality of snap edge last year. Its too wobbly now, no strength to it.

IRRIG8TION
03-03-2008, 10:22 PM
Yes you can use a 7-1/2" circular saw. I use a worm gear saw because it has a lot higher torque.

Majesticman
03-04-2008, 02:14 AM
One thing I like about cutting with a cut off with water is the brick will stay put instead of shaking down. do the cut and wash off the sludge before it dries.

You are right about silicosis. It is a horrible slow death. Don might had a couple of years left. He used to laugh at me because I wore a respirator type of mask.

I have a high quality water hose we filled with antifreeze and use as a flexible line. I use the colored lumber markers and wax pencils to mark the brick.

We made a cart (got the idea from the pave tech saw cart) for the 5.5 hp saw out of a hay truck (wide hand cart) with wheels on the handles and installed a tractor seat. On the tight cuts a man sets on the seat and can just pick up a brick and run it through the saw making it a one man job. He just pushes himself backward along boarder.

I use 14 inch saws but will use 12in. blades when the turns get tight. When they get too tight we use the cart.

Majesticman
03-04-2008, 02:22 AM
One more little helper. When you need to remove an impossible brick on a finished job don't give up and break it out. Use a small electric pressure washer with a needle spray. Just buzz around the brick and lift it out with the lifter.

neversatisfiedj
03-04-2008, 08:23 AM
I wonder how many people worried about the dust are going out for a smoke right now. HAHA Funny world.

zedosix
03-04-2008, 08:52 AM
I wonder how many people worried about the dust are going out for a smoke right now. HAHA Funny world.

Personally I don't smoke, it just interferes with life.

Baumer
03-04-2008, 07:33 PM
I don't smoke either, but I just attended an ICPI class in Delaware, OH and the instructor was telling us that within 3 yrs. OSHA is going to crack down on dust from equipment. It's all part of going Green.

Majesticman
03-05-2008, 12:55 PM
I wonder how many people worried about the dust are going out for a smoke right now. HAHA Funny world.

I smoked (but stopped) and Don is dying. He didn't smoke but gripped at me about it. You guys are young so wait until you hit your 50's. That dust is much worse than smoke and when you are doing 1/4 mile cuts on streets that is a lot of breathing in the dust zone. At the end of the day you will cough up red, gray, or brown stuff depending on the brick color.

It is an OSHA thing. I feel for you if you ever get one of those claims on you W comp. You will never get your cost back down.

Generals are now telling us to keep the dust down to keep it out of other work zones. They don't say anything about a few dry cuts but racing a 300 foot cut gets you in trouble.

Total Landscape Solutions
03-05-2008, 02:59 PM
I sometimes wear a dust mask, sometimes not. Rarely cut wet, just don't want to deal with the mess.
I'd wear a respirator but I have never found one that was really comfortable. Anyone use a respirator that works well and find it comfortable?

neversatisfiedj
03-05-2008, 04:17 PM
I bought the best one that depot offers. It's not too bad. Sucks when it's 90 degrees out tough. I may buy another TS400 and keep one hooked to the hose and use my other TS400 to score dry. I can't afford a couple grand right now for table saw.

neversatisfiedj
03-05-2008, 04:27 PM
Here ya go

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=2180&familyName=3M%2B6000%2BFullface%2BRespirators&history=1ct6gskh|top_category|page~GRID^categoryName~Safety^categoryId~492@cwczc9yl|other|refine~1^p age~GRID^categoryName~3M%2BRespirators^categoryId~549

McKeeLand
03-05-2008, 04:58 PM
This is what i use now, its no good on super hot days, but it is the best respirator to use that i have found. it is 10x more comfortable than any other and the lens does not fog up like safety glasses or goggles do. dust masks are useless.

jreiff
03-05-2008, 06:15 PM
Majesticman, you have a picture of your paver cart that you made for your saw???

tcalb2
03-06-2008, 05:57 PM
Zedosix: I agree with your comment about snap edge. I brought this same problem to my dealer last season and he didn't have a clue what I was talking about. I told him that for some reason latly the snap edge wasn't sturdy enough. I'm looking to go with perma loc this season how about you, which edge restraint have you switched to?

zedosix
03-06-2008, 06:24 PM
Zedosix: I agree with your comment about snap edge. I brought this same problem to my dealer last season and he didn't have a clue what I was talking about. I told him that for some reason latly the snap edge wasn't sturdy enough. I'm looking to go with perma loc this season how about you, which edge restraint have you switched to?

I am looking at permaloc right now, but I need to see a full length of the stuff before I make a decision.

Total Landscape Solutions
03-06-2008, 09:22 PM
Zedo,
I know we have disagreed on the snap edge before. I just don't see that big of a difference to make me stop buying the product. It still works well, even better than some other products out there claiming to be edge restraint. I'll continue to use it. It does what it is designed to do. I have had no problems to date with the new stuff. Time will tell, but I am confident in the product.

zedosix
03-06-2008, 10:31 PM
Zedo,
I know we have disagreed on the snap edge before. I just don't see that big of a difference to make me stop buying the product. It still works well, even better than some other products out there claiming to be edge restraint. I'll continue to use it. It does what it is designed to do. I have had no problems to date with the new stuff. Time will tell, but I am confident in the product.

If you all of a sudden got 25% less fuel mileage on your trucks, would you notice the difference? I know its not the same, but they have reduced the sidewall thickness by 25% and now are using recycled material. It does not do for me what it used to. I am one fussy #^$@&@&^!% er and when it comes to doing my best and giving my best I expect it of all my suppliers. I've lost confidence in their product, simple as that.

tcalb2
03-07-2008, 05:34 PM
Zedosix: If you go to pr*hardscaper.com the perma loc rep is sending out samples of its new edge restraints. I can't seem to post the link but its under "tools of the trade". I've already contacted him.

Majesticman
03-07-2008, 10:58 PM
Majesticman, you have a picture of your paver cart that you made for your saw???

Sorry but that would again give away my anonymity to my competitors. I will see if I can find the Pave-tech cart picture for you.

Majesticman
03-08-2008, 12:05 AM
This is what i use now, its no good on super hot days, but it is the best respirator to use that i have found. it is 10x more comfortable than any other and the lens does not fog up like safety glasses or goggles do. dust masks are useless.


That is the same ones we use. We pay about $100 for them.

GroundScapesIncorporated
03-08-2008, 12:54 AM
Do you have any close up pics of some curved courses that you've cut?

You will not find crisper cuts than Zedo's, Ive seen many pictures of his work. First class all the way.

landstyles
03-10-2008, 08:36 PM
You will not find crisper cuts than Zedo's, Ive seen many pictures of his work. First class all the way.

His cuts are crisp, but I'm up for the challenge. :weightlifter:

jbailey52
03-10-2008, 10:45 PM
what is a "borbered walk"?

zedosix
03-10-2008, 10:57 PM
what is a "borbered walk"?

I give up! What is a "borbered walk"?

jbailey52
03-11-2008, 09:14 PM
-------->(This is when I wish I had something funny to say)

zedosix
03-11-2008, 09:41 PM
I think this would be one of those threads that is coming to the end of its cycle! :walking:

jbailey52
03-12-2008, 09:39 PM
No Pulse... Ill call it.....


20:38 03-12-08


R>I>P

*trucewhiteflag*

btammo
03-21-2008, 03:56 PM
I guess I am just pig headed. I understand how you are going the whole "Cut in place" thing, but I just cant picture it in my brain. I wish it was on youtube or something where I could see a video on it. I would love to be able to watch someone do it. We waste alot of time cutting each piece at the wet saw.

haybaler
04-23-2008, 02:41 PM
I was thinking about cutting them in place. Question: should I run the compactor over the walk one time before I make the cut? maybe it would help keep everything in place

zedosix
04-23-2008, 03:14 PM
I was thinking about cutting them in place. Question: should I run the compactor over the walk one time before I make the cut? maybe it would help keep everything in place

NO and NO and NO.