PDA

View Full Version : CDL's


Mike33
09-05-2006, 10:44 AM
I read different post on concern of cdl's. I have even seen a few of tagging a truck low on weight to get by this. I cant understand why every one is indimadated by them. Here in Md. any thing over 10,000 lbs. is commercial = dot # on side of truck, phy. card, triangles, fire ext., and preventance maintance sheet that only has to be filled out once a year. If you drive less than 150 miles no log book needed. I have had cdl for 15 years even before i started in business i got them belonging to the local vfd. So what is the big deal , they cost me maybe 10.00 more than reg. lic. but im not going to go out and under haul or under tag a truck because im scarred of cdl lic. I just consider it another element of business.
Mike

FearThisDeere
09-05-2006, 06:13 PM
I agree with you Mike. I am hoping to get mine this winter as I could always benefit from one and I am going to start volunteer firefighting soon. What intimidates me is that I have talked to guys that I know that said that it took them three tries to get a CDL and they are very good drivers. Also, I am afraid that I would not be able to handle a huge truck just yet. I am 18. I have driven a 24' Uhaul box truck without an issue, but I just don't know if I am ready to jump up to something bigger that has air brakes.

Dirt Digger2
09-05-2006, 06:23 PM
i'm 19 and haul a 11,000 pound trailer behind a 350 dump, drive a international 4700 service truck and f-550. but you always gotta go bigger...haha, i got my CDL permit a few months ago, and will probably go for my driving test right before it expires...so "fearthisdeere" it just takes a little practice and you get the hang of driving the big boys...you just have to know people that have trucks.

Birdhunter1
09-05-2006, 06:28 PM
Driving during the test is no different than driving as you normally would.should.

It's the pre-trip inspection that is a PITA!

I've got a class B CDL with air brakes (I can drive anything with air brakes with no trailer) and I renewed mine a few weeks ago even though I don't drive a 10 wheeler anymore just so I wouldn't have to retake the pre-trip test when I go to get it again sometime in the future.

Mike33
09-05-2006, 07:38 PM
Yes drive normal, i have B with air brakes. How many times on the job have you taken an extra try to get that trailer in, it happens. My worst mistake i did on my test was to get fancy and split shift across the parking lot, i missed the rpm and had to go again. My examiner which was a women looked over and laughed and said, most people dont do that on the road test. Yes the pre trip was a pita due to our fire trucks was older and i spent 2 days getting all the lights to work that was ignored for years.
Mike

Birdhunter1
09-05-2006, 08:36 PM
When I got mine in 2002 I had to take all the test over again, I had gotten a CDL-B with air brakes when I was 18 but let it go when I was 21 so I had to retake the tests.

Te examiner looked at me when we were driving and said "it looks liek you've done this before?"

Honestly when you go to take the driving test you should be profficient enough to not have to worry about anything driving wise, the pre-trip is an entirely different story depending on what the examiner is like. I still get cringes from the first time I took the pre trip test.. things like points deducted for not actually pulling out a tire tread depth gauge and checking the tire tread depths on a brand new set of tires all around the truck.

Stafford Landscaping
09-05-2006, 08:46 PM
I agree with you Mike. I am hoping to get mine this winter as I could always benefit from one and I am going to start volunteer firefighting soon. What intimidates me is that I have talked to guys that I know that said that it took them three tries to get a CDL and they are very good drivers. Also, I am afraid that I would not be able to handle a huge truck just yet. I am 18. I have driven a 24' Uhaul box truck without an issue, but I just don't know if I am ready to jump up to something bigger that has air brakes.

Don't sweat it I've got my class A's. Just need to practice a bit before you go Just drive like you naturally would. Don't try to impress the instructor. Just study the book from front to back. So you can learn how the air brakes work and the parts and your pre trip inspection.

FearThisDeere
09-05-2006, 09:45 PM
Thanks for the advice Stafford and Dirt Digger2

fiveoboy01
09-05-2006, 10:10 PM
I've had my class A for years.

It's easy, just practice before you take the road test, and you gotta know how to do a thorough pre-trip.

Mike33
09-05-2006, 10:43 PM
Now i have just seen some real nice and painless posts to my thread about cdl's. My point was kind of proven here , why is people trying to get around these? There are threads about this neat truck or trailer ( but by god we aint going to do this because of cdl's ) i think if your starting out or even in it for a while that would be a lot easier than running that excavater or skid steer that you probably think you know every thing about it.
Mike

Electra_Glide
09-06-2006, 11:48 AM
I just passed my class A road test last month. It wasn't too bad, but I took a route that's a little different.

I went to the local commercial driving school and enrolled in their "self-study" course. It consisted of three phases: pre-trip (including air brake), range, and road. It's the streamlined version of their standard course. They provided all the study materials for the pre-trip and after a week of studying, the instructor tested me. Then spent a few weeks on the range practicing backing (straight-line and driver's side parallel), then some time out on the road, and I was ready to test. I passed on my first attempt.

The benefits of this approach were:

1) They prepared me for the test (including running the actual test course a number of times) so that nothing was a surprise. The PA test is done on a "points" system, and there's lots of little things to keep in mind to make sure you don't accumulate enough points to fail (keep checking your mirrors, stopping too close to the vehicle in front of you, shifting in the intersections, etc.). Had I just "done it on my own", I wouldn't have known about these things.

2) Their procedures for the pre-trip and airbrake were much easier to follow and had a better "flow" than what was in the state manual.

3) I tested in a tractor-trailer (conventional Kenworth, 13 spd., 45ft trailer), so I have no restrictions on my license. This seems to vary from state to state. Depending on your state and the type of vehicle you take your test in, you could end up with restrictions on your license (automatic transmission, no 5th wheel, etc.).

4) Most importantly, they taught me how to drive a large commercial vehicle. Things like managing your road speed vs. engine RPM, proper braking techniques, proper space management (following distances, acceleration zones, gaps in traffic, etc.). All these things are invaluable since there's a BIG difference between driving a commercial vehicle, and driving your private vehicle. I also think these things have made me a better driver overall.

5) I got to tool around town in a big truck, which was kinda cool and something I always wanted to do...:drinkup:

The only drawback was the cost. It was much shorter and cheaper than their standard course, but it still cost be about $1400 (as compared to $5000 for the full-blown course). Total time in class was about 40 hours spread out over about 10-12 weeks, with about 35 of those hours behind the wheel. All of my time behind the wheel was one-on-one with the instructor, which is different than how they do it for their regular classes.

Joe

lawnmaniac883
09-06-2006, 04:07 PM
I feel the same way about CDL's. Fact is they made the cut off 26k for a reason. Reason being is that you probably dont know how to correctly drive a vehicle that weighs more than 26000 pounds. Take the time to get set up correctly, take the test and be free to drive a commercial vehicle and not need worry about DOT and their BS. If you avoid the CDL then you will either end up hurting yourself or someone else down the road from lack of knowledge.

Gravel Rat
09-06-2006, 04:53 PM
That CDL rule you guys have in the states is the dumbest regulation you can dream of. Talk about your gov't having no faith in your guys skills :confused:

Here in B.C. a person with a regular drivers license can operate a 2 axle truck with any gvw. If you can't drive a 35,000lb gvw truck safely then you shouldn't be driving simple as that. In B.C. we have killer highways with 10% grades and sharp turns. The people that have the most trouble are people from large cities like Vancouver and out of province mainly Alberta.

People with huge trailers being pulled with P/U trucks is far more dangerous than a 5 ton truck with a 35,000lb gvw. Its why the local gov't made a law that states if your pulling a trailer heavier than 10,000lbs you need a CDL that applies to trailers pulled behind a P/U truck rv or commercial.

A 26,000lb truck is less than a 3 ton truck most of the school busses that run in the area have a 33,000lb gvw.

Also down in the US your legal maximum gross weight of any truck without permits is 80,000lbs where as in B.C. Canada its 140,000lbs. Anybody that is fresh out of driving school with their class 1 (A) CDL can get in a truck tractor and hook up to a set of B trains and gross 140,000lbs.

Common sense kicks in and the person thinks I better get some miles under my belt with a light gross weight of 80,000lbs first. It takes some skill before you start decending the hills aka 10% grades with a combination grossing 140,000lbs.

murray83
09-06-2006, 05:01 PM
your class system in BC much like here?

our basic license is a class 5 for cars and trucks with an air brake endorsement i can run a single axle dump

class 3 is for tandems and class 1 is transports or a truck carrying a tag along.

i'm not educated on a CDL must be like our class 1 here i dunno.

i dunno about BC or Ontario but here there is no DOT number's on trucks unless its a transport or your entering the states.

Gravel Rat
09-06-2006, 05:46 PM
It is the same here a class 1 can drive anything except for a motor bike and a class 3 which is what I have can only operate a straight truck with any gvw no trailers except for if the trailer is on juice brakes and the truck pulling the trailer is on juice brakes.

Class 5 license is for any 2 axle vehical with any gvw but if the truck has air you need a air brake endorsement on your license. I got a air endorsement when I was 17 because I run single axle trucks on air then 3 years later I went to driving school and got my class 3. I don't really want or need a class 1 all I drive is a tandem axle dump I have no desire to go long haul trucking.

B.C. deregulated the trucking industry before you needed a motor carrier plate and a bunch of other B.S. now its a NSC number which I have makes you a licensed trucking company. I can haul all over B.C. now without any restrictions. I need a NSC number because I own and operate a truck heavier than 12,000lb gvw for business. It was a pain in the azz to get but in the long run it is worth it because I'am legal now and the DOT can kiss my :laugh:

The only bad part about having a NSC number is if you get 3 or 4 demerits against your license say 3 speeding ticket etc the DOT pulls your NSC number and you never get it back. So essentially you never will be able to operate your own trucking company. Also with our drinking and driving rules if you blow over a certain amount on the breath test you loose your CDL luckly I don't drink.

murray83
09-06-2006, 07:02 PM
i remember i think it was january all the provinces were to get together and create 1 set of rules for commercial trucks and the americans would follow suit,that lasted about a month.

lawnmaniac883
09-06-2006, 09:37 PM
That would be a scary sight if anyone with a license could drive a commercial vehicle...could you imagine that? So what you are saying is you feel comfortable driving infront of a 18yr old punk azz kid who is driving a 36000lb truck that has 2 axles, air brakes and a 10yd dump bed full of gravel? Yall are nutzzz or maybe just that BC has better drivers than america, I could easily see that happening.

Mike33
09-06-2006, 10:30 PM
I will tell what i think is scarry is these rv.s and nothing against them but i think any one can hop in them and take off.
Mike

Mike33
09-06-2006, 10:39 PM
It is the same here a class 1 can drive anything except for a motor bike and a class 3 which is what I have can only operate a straight truck with any gvw no trailers except for if the trailer is on juice brakes and the truck pulling the trailer is on juice brakes.

Class 5 license is for any 2 axle vehical with any gvw but if the truck has air you need a air brake endorsement on your license. I got a air endorsement when I was 17 because I run single axle trucks on air then 3 years later I went to driving school and got my class 3. I don't really want or need a class 1 all I drive is a tandem axle dump I have no desire to go long haul trucking.

B.C. deregulated the trucking industry before you needed a motor carrier plate and a bunch of other B.S. now its a NSC number which I have makes you a licensed trucking company. I can haul all over B.C. now without any restrictions. I need a NSC number because I own and operate a truck heavier than 12,000lb gvw for business. It was a pain in the azz to get but in the long run it is worth it because I'am legal now and the DOT can kiss my :laugh:

The only bad part about having a NSC number is if you get 3 or 4 demerits against your license say 3 speeding ticket etc the DOT pulls your NSC number and you never get it back. So essentially you never will be able to operate your own trucking company. Also with our drinking and driving rules if you blow over a certain amount on the breath test you loose your CDL luckly I don't drink.
Im not saying we have a perfect system im talking about people who dont want to abide by the system we have no choice of. I think a lot dot is **** but it is there ( Elements of Business ) my business plays by the rules. I dont think some kid or 90 year old person should be able to hop in a vechicle over 10,000 and take off. I live in the mountains of w.md. coal country there are some real good truck drivers in my area that can handle the mts. in all kind of weather. They are not about to let any one jump in there truck like a older mack with a Quada plex trany ( 18 speed 2 sticks ) and take off.
Mike

Gravel Rat
09-07-2006, 12:33 AM
Yes a 80 year old man that has driven a Toyota corrolla all his life can jump into a big diesel pusher motor home and is legal to drive it down the road.

Usually younger drivers are not interested in driving a truck unless they are in landscaping or excavating etc. There really hasn't been any accidents in B.C. because there is no requirement for a CDL for a heavier single axle truck.

You got to remember we have steep grades in B.C. 10% are normal grades anything less is mole hills. We have some in this area that have a 20% grade so no trucks allowed its too steep. A 10% grade doesn't scare me its the 20% grades some of the residential driveways have that scare me these are not short driveways some are 500 to 1000' long.

You get anybody from rural B.C. they know how to drive in the hills if you don't you can end up dead :eek:

Like I meantioned a heavy trailer behind a P/U truck is way more dangerous than driving a 35,000lb single axle truck. Once your brakes fail on your trailer there is no hope in h*ll your P/U truck will stop it. The trailer will keep pushing you down the hill usually out of controll over the bank you become food for the bald eagles.

I'am more scared of the people that pull RV trailers they only pull a trailer 2-3 times in the summer they can't handle their truck they are cutting over the center line of the road to make the corners. They are going down the hills too fast talk about frigging scary. Swearving all over the road they don't pull over to let the traffic behind them pass.

Usually people know if they hop into a heavy 2 axle truck like a single axle dump know they have a choice take it easy and drive the truck safely or end up cutting their life short. In my area alone 7 people have been killed on the highway in the past 6 months because they don't know how to handle driving here.

FearThisDeere
09-07-2006, 11:47 AM
Those RVs are very scary. I get nervous driving by one of them. I drove a Freightliner FTL 60 or something like that. It had been converted into a toter truck for a race car trailer. It had a 14 foot sleeper on the back and a 44' car trailer. The guy that owns it is a good friend of mine. He let me drive it around the block a few times and I would never want anyone w/o a CDL to drive it even though they can because it is registered at a motor home. I think you should need a CDL to drive ANYTHING over 26k lbs. and I think 26k lbs. is very generous.

willretire@40
09-07-2006, 12:14 PM
I need to know what kind of cdl i need in order to pull a 14000 gvw dump trailer with a 3/4 ton truck.

fiveoboy01
09-07-2006, 12:27 PM
I believe I am correct here, but someone hit me over the head if I'm wrong.

To answer the previous post, you do not need a CDL if the total gross is under 26,000#. Cause where I work, all the consumer rental straight trucks, which are almost always rented to customers without CDLs, are stickered at 25,500#. I would'nt think that a combination vehicle would change that, as long as it was under 26K.


I think the biggest obstacle to people getting their CDL is the training. As one person mentioned before, they paid a fair amount of money to take a basic course. The prices only go up from there.

I was fortunate to work at a job where I had access to a number of tractors and trailers, and months of driving in the lot and backing in helped me out a lot. My employer also supplied the truck for the road test and paid for my instruction permit. Only thing I had to pay for was the license itself.

Mike33
09-07-2006, 09:25 PM
I need to know what kind of cdl i need in order to pull a 14000 gvw dump trailer with a 3/4 ton truck.
Not to sound stupid i have had cdls for a long time and dont know the law of who needs them, it might vary from state to state.
Mike

Gravel Rat
09-07-2006, 10:00 PM
A 26,000lb gvw truck is a piece of cake like I said most schoolbusses have 30,000lb gvws I don't know why you guys are so scared of a 3 ton truck for.

If you really think a person needs a CDL to operate a 26,000lb truck then you guys can't drive or don't have enough confidence.

Only in the US has the rule that requires a CDL for a truck larger than a 3 ton which is dumb in my mind. But I guess if you guys have people not bright enough to hold a frigging steering wheel and handle a truck I guess you need that 26,000lb rule. It must show the mentality of US citizens if the gov't can't trust anybody to drive a truck.

There hasn't been very many accidents from single axle 5 ton trucks with a 30,000lb and greater gvw causing serious accidents because the person driving the truck doesn't hold a cdl.

Mike33
09-07-2006, 11:40 PM
A 26,000lb gvw truck is a piece of cake like I said most schoolbusses have 30,000lb gvws I don't know why you guys are so scared of a 3 ton truck for.

If you really think a person needs a CDL to operate a 26,000lb truck then you guys can't drive or don't have enough confidence.

Only in the US has the rule that requires a CDL for a truck larger than a 3 ton which is dumb in my mind. But I guess if you guys have people not bright enough to hold a frigging steering wheel and handle a truck I guess you need that 26,000lb rule. It must show the mentality of US citizens if the gov't can't trust anybody to drive a truck.

There hasn't been very many accidents from single axle 5 ton trucks with a 30,000lb and greater gvw causing serious accidents because the person driving the truck doesn't hold a cdl.
I think your crossing the fence on your comment of American citizens. I will admit we might have some stupid laws but you have that any where. I used to hunt in Ontario on numerous times and seen some domb ass laws in Canada also. But i would not make the comment you just did. I think we fare pretty good, your country would be in sad shape with out American tourism.
Mike :usflag:

Gravel Rat
09-08-2006, 12:42 AM
I don't mean to offend anybody but you guys really have to trust other people that share the road with each other. :canadaflag:

Operating a truck heavier than 26,000lbs is no big deal when it comes to tandem axle trucks and combination vehicals then a CDL is required.

What is with the difference between a 26,000lb truck over a 35,000lb truck both medium duty trucks both can kill somebody. A medium duty truck is a medium duty truck one just carrys more both have the same dimensions.

I don't know why the USA doesn't adopt the same rules we have here where you need a CDL for a truck with 3 or more axles and a class A you guys already have.

You can't tell me that you guys that already drive a 26,000lb truck feel that you need to be taught how to drive a 33,000lb gvw truck or you need a CDL to operate it. The only thing that might be different would be air brakes on a 33,000lb gvw truck.

FearThisDeere
09-08-2006, 09:54 PM
I have never driven air brakes before, so excuse the dumb question, but what is the big difference with air brakes? Are they really that much harder to operate that you would need to have a special license to operate them CORRECTLY?

Gravel Rat
09-08-2006, 10:35 PM
Air brakes are safer if they are working properly because they have so much more stopping power. Juice brakes are horrible in 5 ton trucks they don't provide enough stopping power.

If you are buying a truck you want one with full air not air over hydraulic.

Mike33
09-08-2006, 10:42 PM
I don't mean to offend anybody but you guys really have to trust other people that share the road with each other. :canadaflag:

Operating a truck heavier than 26,000lbs is no big deal when it comes to tandem axle trucks and combination vehicals then a CDL is required.

What is with the difference between a 26,000lb truck over a 35,000lb truck both medium duty trucks both can kill somebody. A medium duty truck is a medium duty truck one just carrys more both have the same dimensions.

I don't know why the USA doesn't adopt the same rules we have here where you need a CDL for a truck with 3 or more axles and a class A you guys already have.

You can't tell me that you guys that already drive a 26,000lb truck feel that you need to be taught how to drive a 33,000lb gvw truck or you need a CDL to operate it. The only thing that might be different would be air brakes on a 33,000lb gvw truck.
Have you ever seen a country where the working man writes the law. You cant help the system you just have to abide by it,
Mike

Dirt Digger2
09-08-2006, 10:51 PM
I have never driven air brakes before, so excuse the dumb question, but what is the big difference with air brakes? Are they really that much harder to operate that you would need to have a special license to operate them CORRECTLY?

to operate them correctly is the easy part, any one that can push a brake pedal can operate them. the part you need to have special licensing for is if they fail. You need to prove to the state that you need to know what to do if your compressor fails, if the service line blows, what happens if the warning buzzer comes on, what brake lag is, etc...,etc...

Gravel Rat
09-08-2006, 11:08 PM
To get a air endorsement its a 16 hour course (2 full 8 hour days) then go write a test and do a physical test on a truck. Its allot of info to take in but its doable I did mine at a driving school. There is nothing scary about air brakes you know how they work and how to adjust them your fine.

More people have troubles because they don't adjust the brakes properly. Also people that have trucks with automatic slack adjusters think they are not suppose to check them which is TOTALLY not true. Every time you use the truck your suppose to check the brakes and adjust them if the truck has manual slack adjusters.

When the DOT has fines for 100 dollars for every slack adjuster out of adjustement that gets pretty expensive when you have a truck tractor with a Super B in tow. Thats a 1600 dollar fine if every slack adjuster is not adjusted properly that fine comes out of the drivers pocket as the driver is responsible for adjusting the brakes.

If you have automatic slack adjusters if they are out of adjustment the DOT can and will give you a fine for them being out because you never checked them.

Dirt Digger2
09-09-2006, 10:59 AM
wow Gravel Rat...we just have to pass a 25 question written test, and then its included in the driving test to finally get the endorsment

FearThisDeere
09-09-2006, 11:26 AM
I see. I always thought that there was a different way of driving with them. I thought they were really touchy or something. Shows you how much I know.

Gravel Rat
09-09-2006, 02:33 PM
The DOT and the DMV doesn't fool around when it comes to air brakes because of the steep grades in B.C. .

Dirt Digger2
09-09-2006, 06:31 PM
I see. I always thought that there was a different way of driving with them. I thought they were really touchy or something. Shows you how much I know.

well there is...with all the weight riding on the brakes there are diffrent types of braking to avoid brake fade...its not like a car where you can reley on brakes alone going down a hill. you need to learn how to control speed by mainly engine braking and using the service brakes only when needed.