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View Full Version : polyurea grease?


Envy Lawn Service
09-16-2006, 06:44 PM
Just wondering if anyone uses polyurea type grease on their mowers?
If so do you use it in the spindles also?

Envy Lawn Service
09-17-2006, 01:39 AM
I guess nobody uses this stuff?

rodfather
09-17-2006, 09:02 AM
I've never heard of it...what is it exactly? Or how does it differ from the red stuff?

Daner
09-17-2006, 09:35 AM
I'm Just Guessing here...But Poly May work real well In The deck spindles.
Its used a lot In constant running motors.

olderthandirt
09-17-2006, 09:40 AM
I use Amsoil synthetic grease in most everything. LOVE IT.

Envy Lawn Service
09-17-2006, 11:58 AM
I've never heard of it...what is it exactly? Or how does it differ from the red stuff?

Well, this type of grease is most well known for being John Deere's grease of choice (internet search), but I actually first saw it on Timken's web-site (bearing maker).

Anyways, it's a grease that first came out a long time ago when they were looking to thicken grease, make it ooze out less, ect. But it really did not catch on well because the first generation of it was NOT compatible with lithium base greases.

That is also in a nutshell the difference between the 'red stuff' and this. Almost all of the red greases are lithium based. This stuff is polyurea based.

I'm really surprised. I thought the Deere owners would chime in because it seems most of them don't use anything that doesn't have a Deere emblem on it.

Anyways, I have a tube of the stuff here. After reading "polyurea grease" on Timken's website I had to see what it was all about. Maybe it's silly, but I'm curious like that. Never seen Timken grease here, so I found the Deere stuff at a dealer in the next town when I happened to be there for something else.

Looking at this grease, it's dark green stuff and stinks real good. What's different that I see is the texture and flowable appearance. It's THICK, seems almost too thick and somewhat drier. I mean you can take the cap off it, turn it upside down and it doesn't move. No oils or anything come running out either.

Call me wierd, but I find this stuff interesting. Now I don't know what type "red stuff" you use Rod, but what I use is like the great penetrator... There's nothing you can put it in that it will not weep out of when good and warm. Like 80 and above. It even weeps out around the threads of my grease gun. So it comes out of anything you put it in on the mowers.

This polyurea stuff doesn't 'look like' it would do this.

It looks like it 'might' be good for applications like spindles.
Not sure about general purpose though.

rodfather
09-17-2006, 01:20 PM
Interesting...think I'll give it a try. Thanks.

Envy Lawn Service
09-17-2006, 01:27 PM
Interesting...think I'll give it a try. Thanks.

Yeah, I think it's interesting too.

I just feel I need to get a little more educated on it first.

MMLawn
09-17-2006, 01:39 PM
I'm telling you Castrol Pyroplex Blue......the only way to go.

Envy Lawn Service
09-17-2006, 02:07 PM
I'm telling you Castrol Pyroplex Blue......the only way to go.

You don't use John Deere factory filled and recommended grease?
Shame on you... don't you know if it don't have a deere on it, it's not supposed to go in it?

J/K... LOL :laugh:

I've kept my eyes open for some of that Castrol Pyroplex Blue, but I haven't seen any anywhere. What is it Mike, a lithium grease? What do you like about it?

Are you familiar with this polyurea grease I'm talking about that deere uses?
If so, can you tell us anything about it?

WildWest
09-17-2006, 02:43 PM
I know of the grease you're talking about, green thick and gooey! You can put a blob of it on a table and smack it with a hammer and it won't splatter! I wouldn't use it in bearings! It's made for HEAVY USE/HEAVY WEAR like back hoe buckets, king pins, large shafts w/ bushings that have HEAVY pressure's on them.

It also attracts every grain of dirt that comes it's way. The dirt gets worked into the grease all the way around the bearings and then into the zerk fitting hole and plugs it up so hard that I have bent grease gun handles trying to force new grease in, only to have to disassemble the "item" scrape the old crap out (which is hard as a rock by now), reassemble and grease again.

Use a lighter grease, the red or blue stuff, grease at least monthly, better yet weekly, wipe excess off, don't shoot pressure washer water at bearings/pivot points/bushings. All will be well in the world.

Envy Lawn Service
09-18-2006, 12:25 AM
WildWest,

Is that the first generation stuff you are talking about or this stuff out now?

Not that I'm a big Deere fan, but they use this stuff as factory fill, recommend it in their maintenance charts, sell it with their name on it through their dealers, and like on a mower, they put it in everything.

Personally, I'm just trying to learn something about it after running across it.
I didn't know it existed, either generation...

However, I do recall a long time ago that I had to purge something like you describe out of a piece of grading equipment. It took 2 people, a strong gun and all new grease fittings.

WildWest
09-18-2006, 01:40 AM
WildWest,

Is that the first generation stuff you are talking about or this stuff out now?

Not that I'm a big Deere fan, but they use this stuff as factory fill, recommend it in their maintenance charts, sell it with their name on it through their dealers, and like on a mower, they put it in everything.

Personally, I'm just trying to learn something about it after running across it.
I didn't know it existed, either generation...

However, I do recall a long time ago that I had to purge something like you describe out of a piece of grading equipment. It took 2 people, a strong gun and all new grease fittings.

As for what generation of grease we were using at the time, I don't know (it was only a year ago). It wasn't "J.D." brand, but was probably made by the same company. We found that it was good for high pressure low heat or sealed bearings in a low dust situation. The reason alot of companies like it is because it doesn't "sling" off very easily. If you use a lighter grease and your seals are good, slinging isn't an issue.

It'll stay in a bearing forever, and as you put new grease in, if your old grease that you think you are pushing out, is older and drier, full of dirt and getting packed in, the new grease will squeeze right past and ooze out the other side.

I wouldn't put that stuff in ANYTHING of mine.... ever. Just from what I've seen as a mechanic. But, hey, I'm not an engineer, and GOD knows...they know everything! :rolleyes:

Envy Lawn Service
09-18-2006, 02:03 AM
I've seen exactly what you are saying.

I never knew what kind of grease that was I had a problem with though, but it sounds just like it.

You could hit the zerks (took some doing) and get grease in there, only to have certain types of moving parts start to squeak in no time. I got tired of all that and the clogging. We warmed all the areas carefully while the zerks were removed where we could see just a little, installed new serks and pumped grease until we purged the stuff out.

All those points failed prematurely... which I figured was from minor damage while the stuff was in there and more that anything I figured the mixing of the greases that happened due to the way it was done. Just wasn't practical to disassemble everything at the time. But after the failures, the replacement stuff lasted forever on the plain-jane greases... one blue for some stuff, one white for other stuff.