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View Full Version : A Few Harley Rake Questions


dozerman21
10-25-2006, 09:40 PM
I'm thinking of getting a Harley Rake for my CT332 sometime, and I have a few questions for you guys that use one.

1.) I will probably buy a new one unless I find a good deal on a used Rake. How much should I be able to get a new one for? It will be the 8 footer (MX-8, I think). I also want the power angle.

2.) How much are you guys charging per hour, Rake time only, when figuring an estimate. I was thinking app. $100-$125 per hour. Am I in the ballpark? I always try to bid by the job, I'm just looking for something to go by when giving and estimate.

3.) What kind of maintenence does a Harley Rake have? I'm only going to use this occasionally, I was just curious how the bearings and wear and tear parts hold up?

Thanks for any info!:drinkup:

ksss
10-25-2006, 10:52 PM
Unless you have your heart set on a Harley rake. You may want to try an FFC Preparator. Similiar to a Rock Hound only instead of chains with teeth it has a drum. I think they do a great job you can pickup material rather than spin it to one side or the other. I know a lot of guys like the Harley but there are some alternatives out there as well. The Preparator is much more heavily built than a rockhound and does a nicer job especially in tough ground conditions. As far as what to charge that is probably a regional thing. I get $85.00 an hour although I try not to work by the hour whenever possible. I would try and price your competetion and see what they are getting.

dozerman21
10-26-2006, 12:56 AM
I'm not too familiar with the FFC. I've heard of it but I haven't seen one in person. I want to do more finish grading on the side, and a couple of the landscapers that I do rough grades for use the Harley Rakes. I like they way they churn the dirt and lay a seed bed. I'm new to these Power Rakes and I don't know all the different makes and models. I saw an ad yesterday for the Quick-Attach brand. They claim to churn down 4 inches. It didn't look as rugged, but maybe it was just the picture. I haven't seen one of those in action either though.

ksss
10-26-2006, 01:47 AM
I have bought a Grapple type bucket and pickup broom from Quick Attach. I am happy with both of them. Very well built. That may or may not apply to their landscape rakes. Erskine and Quick Attach are the same company. You may go to a rental yard and rent several different attachments and see which one suits your needs the best.

Scag48
10-26-2006, 03:18 AM
Rock Hounds and Harley's do much different things. Rock hounds are great if you're doing just that, picking up rock. Yes they leave a great finished product and they pick debris the best, but they will not physically cut and fill an area. Depends on what you're doing. If you're doing smaller areas that can be levelled easily with a skid and a bucket, get the rock hound. If you're doing larger areas that need larger amounts of material moved from one side of the property to another, the Harley is the best choice. On 1/4 acre plus size lots, Harley is the best way to go. Sure windrowing the rock is a PITA, but the Harley is much more versatile in the long run. All you need is a combo bucket and you can pick up piles of rock like nothing. I've even used our Harley to cut roads as it power angles. Take the side wings off, level a patch and get running, it's a road cutting machine.

As far as hourly rates, we get $95 an hour for our Harley. Maintenance is easy and there is very little to do.

Construct'O
10-26-2006, 12:45 PM
With the size machine and 8 ft. Harley that you should be able to price your hourly work more because i would think you could do the job faster because of the size rake if nothing else.

I don't think KSSS and Scag rakes are 8 footers.I would think you would be way better off trying to bid most of your jobs then by the hour.Customers usually shy away when they hear the big price compared to lower rate ,even if your machine will do the job faster.

dozerman21
10-26-2006, 05:23 PM
I agree on giving bids by the job. I always price jobs that way unless I get into a situation where I don't control the variables, or may have more work thrown my way before the job is completed. What I meant by hour rate, was how to figure the price. If I had a job that I thought would take, say... 4 hours, what do I figure I need to make per hour, to figure an estimate. I don't tell the customer it will be X amount of dollars per hour as long as it takes. I tried to say that in my first post, maybe it wasn't clear.

Construct'O- Yeah, I want the 8 footer, so maybe I could charge a little more. I've had better luck though bidding by the job. The sticker shock definetly will make some customers step back, but there the ones who usually want to pay $200 for a $1,000 job, whatever it may be. On the rare occasions where I do bid by the hour, when some customers hear a price in the neighborhood of $100 an hour, they think you're ripping them off. Some people just don't understand how much overhead we have, not to mentiion what it costs to operate this equipment.

Scag and KSSS, It sounds like Harley will be the best choice for me. The jobs I'll be doing with this are mostly larger areas, one being 5 acres. I'll do the quarter acre jobs here and there, but the majority will be larger lots. Are there any tips I need to know when running one, anything that might tear the Rake up? The yards will be roughed in with my dozer, so they'll be pretty slick.:D

Planet Landscaping
10-26-2006, 09:14 PM
Glenmac-Harley rakes is what we have been using for years, They KICK A$$.:weightlifter:

Scag48
10-26-2006, 09:36 PM
Definately get a Harley, the logistics of physically prepping 5 acres with a rockhound would be ridiculous, you'd be dumping it every 10 minutes. Plus, I don't know how fast you can run a rock hound, I've seen one in action, but it's been a long time. With a Harley, you can run it pretty much full speed depending on how much your cut is. Obviously if you're really chewing into the dirt you won't be able to go as fast, but usually the last few passes I make are at full speed to just fluff the top layer. Like I said, rock hounds and Harleys should not be confused, they both perform much different tasks.

Canon Landscaping
10-26-2006, 10:45 PM
Get a Harley not one of the off brand rakes they don't hold up.

all ferris
10-30-2006, 09:35 PM
Bobcats soil conditioner is built way heavier than the harley rake. Bigger drum, direct drive drum (no chain case), bigger tires and wheels.

Scag48
10-31-2006, 04:10 AM
I'm not sure if I like the direct drive idea. I don't think the torque is there. Since Harley runs a chaincase, there is a ratio between the gears as one is smaller than the other, hence for the same amount of power you're getting a lot more work done, much like a transfer case in a truck. Direct drive is simple, but Harley's chaincase is very low maintenance and worst case scenario if you hit something tough it'll only break a chain, not the drive mechanism itself.

all ferris
10-31-2006, 07:59 PM
I'm not sure if I like the direct drive idea. I don't think the torque is there. Since Harley runs a chaincase, there is a ratio between the gears as one is smaller than the other, hence for the same amount of power you're getting a lot more work done, much like a transfer case in a truck. Direct drive is simple, but Harley's chaincase is very low maintenance and worst case scenario if you hit something tough it'll only break a chain, not the drive mechanism itself.


I've used both the harley and the bobcat on the same machine and I could not tell a difference in power.

And since all that drives the bobcat drum is an hyd. orbit motor, when you hit something the drum just stops. Backup a bit of lift the drum and it back spinning.

If you are thinking of getting a harley rake for a skidsteer you owe it to yourself to check out the bobcat soil conditioner. Hands down, better than the harley rake.