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Dirty Water
10-30-2006, 09:37 PM
Replaced an old champion globe valve today from a commercial property. The system is around 20 years old. Someone updated the wiring on it more recently, but these valves are pretty ancient.

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=67235&stc=1&d=1162262363

Two 1.5" globe valves, the one on the bottom was the problem one.

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=67236&stc=1&d=1162262363

Bad Valve removed, I spun it out of the mainline tee so I wouldn't have to redo it. The old valve was threaded into the mainline using a galvanized nipple (into PVC!) I'm surprised this has lasted so long. I spun a new SCH 80 nipple into the tee.

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=67237&stc=1&d=1162262363

New rainbird valve plumbed in. I usually use a SCH 80 nipple instead of the male adapter, but I didn't have a TOE one on my truck in the right length. Also, the picture makes things not look square, but they are square, its just that my camera was tilted. Thats dirt on the two 90's too, not spilled primer.

I rotated the valve because it would be rubbing the other one if they were set opposing like the old one and this configuration let me avoid using a repair fitting.

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=67238&stc=1&d=1162262363

All cleaned up.

Total time was just a hair over an hour.

PurpHaze
10-30-2006, 10:29 PM
Replaced an old champion globe valve today from a commercial property.

Looks like "angle" configuration instead of "globe" configuration.

The old valve was threaded into the mainline using a galvanized nipple (into PVC!) I'm surprised this has lasted so long. I spun a new SCH 80 nipple into the tee.

This is quite common of older systems installed, usually but not always, by plumbers. If you end up replacing a galvanized nipple with a SCH 80 nipple that is too long, one trick is to cut a section out of the SCH 80 nipple and then glue a slip x slip coupling between the two halves to get it down to the size you need. You can also do the opposite for raising a threaded valve, etc. by cutting off one end each of two standard SCH 80 nipples and glueing a coupler to join the two into one longer nipple. Never leave home without a good supply of SCH 80 nipples! :)

New rainbird valve plumbed in. I usually use a SCH 80 nipple instead of the male adapter, but I didn't have a TOE one on my truck in the right length.

If you're in a pinch and you have a TBE (standard "threaded both ends") nipple you can cut it in half. There are times when our supplier is out of TOE nipples but has standard SCH 80 nipples so we'll take those and either cut them in half if they're long enough or just cut the threads off one end if they're a shorter nipple. Now you have a TOE nipple that you can glue onto. Since we always fabricate our own swing joints with the aid of SCH 80 nipples we're never out of 1/2", 3/4" and 1" SCH 80 nipples that can be turned into TOE nipples. We also carry an ample number up to 3" diameter.


Also, the picture makes things not look square, but they are square, its just that my camera was tilted. That's dirt on the two 90's too, not spilled primer.

I rotated the valve because it would be rubbing the other one if they were set opposing like the old one and this configuration let me avoid using a repair fitting.

The 'ol 90/90 "get the heck outa Dodge" lateral line reconnect. Gotta love it!

We redid another 2" valve on a 4" main today but I've already posted similar pics in the past.

Dirty Water
10-30-2006, 10:38 PM
Yeah, they were angle valves. I'm tired :laugh:

I don't run into 1.5" all that often, its either bigger or smaller, and I didn't expect to do this today, or I would have grabbed a few nipples at the shop.

We don't buy TOE nipples, we just chop them in half, though you want the machined ones not the molded ones (or the other way around, but its obvious when you look at them).

PurpHaze
10-30-2006, 11:11 PM
Personally I think the Spears nipples are the best. They have a blank leading edge on the threaded end that makes it very easy to get them started without ever risking cross-threading the things.