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Mike33
11-03-2006, 09:37 PM
okey guys i hate to ask stupid questions, and most of you know me in other forums that i am a prof. landscaper. I am building a new home next spring and thinking about putting in a irrigation system for my yard. We dont have anyone with in 75 miles of my area who does this. Where do i start out? system purchase and how to install. Thanks for the help.
Mike

PurpHaze
11-03-2006, 10:35 PM
Start at the beginning. Make sure your line coming off the water source is big enough to handle your house and irrigation system simultaneously. A little planning and extra cost at the beginning will save you a LOT of headache in the future.

Then go to http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/ , http://www.hunterindustries.com/Resources/FAQs/homeowner_faq.html , http://www.hunterindustries.com/Resources/Design/design_guide.html , http://rainbird.com/diy/design/index.htm, http://www.toro.com/sprinklers/guides.html and read up on design and installation information and/or services. A local supplier, even if 75 miles away can often offer free (or reasonably priced) design services if you buy your parts from them.

irritation
11-03-2006, 10:51 PM
I agree, pay a little extra for a 1" line going to the house.

Ed G
11-04-2006, 05:23 AM
and 1-1/4" irrigation main line

Dirty Water
11-04-2006, 12:09 PM
and 1-1/4" irrigation main line

The only time its worth going to 1-1/4" is if he has more than 10-15 gpm at his source. If his feed is a 5/8" meter, theres not much point unless the mainline has to run a very long way.

Mike33
11-05-2006, 08:57 AM
Okey guys another stupid question. When do you run your lines to the head after yard is final top soil graded or when.
Mike

BSME
11-05-2006, 09:17 AM
I have one landscaper that always wants me to do it after rough grade but before final grade so that I don't mess up the yard for the sod. I did it for him once and after I charged him for all the heads he tore up we decided it was best that I do it after the final grade and he can give it one more rake when the sprinklers are in.

Flow Control
11-05-2006, 09:49 AM
The only time its worth going to 1-1/4" is if he has more than 10-15 gpm at his source. If his feed is a 5/8" meter, theres not much point unless the mainline has to run a very long way.

What's the point of a 1" service line if you are going to have a 5/8 meter?

Flow Control
11-05-2006, 09:50 AM
Okey guys another stupid question. When do you run your lines to the head after yard is final top soil graded or when.
Mike

We always go in after the beds are installed with plant material and before they rockhound.

PurpHaze
11-05-2006, 10:50 AM
What's the point of a 1" service line if you are going to have a 5/8 meter?

Your common residential water meters are often made with various inlet/outlet pipe sizes. It may be a 5/8" meter but it could have a 1/2", 3/4" or 1" inlet/outlet. You can also purchase and install larger water meters and depending on local codes you can/must install a separate water meter for irrigation supplies. On new construction you can get with your architect and request a larger service line and appropriately sized meters. For large residential properties this is a "must" in my book. Work with the largest from the very beginning and it'll pay for itself in the long run.

PurpHaze
11-05-2006, 10:54 AM
Okey guys another stupid question. When do you run your lines to the head after yard is final top soil graded or when.
Mike

Each landscaping/irrigation project is a little different and there's a lot of factors to consider. The general rule of thumb is after the rough grade is completed but that doesn't always hold true. Sometimes it will depend on materials delivery schedules, manpower allotment, local weather, soil type and texture and whether the turf is being seeded/sodded/plugged, etc.

Flow Control
11-05-2006, 11:19 AM
Your common residential water meters are often made with various inlet/outlet pipe sizes. It may be a 5/8" meter but it could have a 1/2", 3/4" or 1" inlet/outlet. You can also purchase and install larger water meters and depending on local codes you can/must install a separate water meter for irrigation supplies. On new construction you can get with your architect and request a larger service line and appropriately sized meters. For large residential properties this is a "must" in my book. Work with the largest from the very beginning and it'll pay for itself in the long run.

The only sizes on residential that I have seen and know of are either 5/8 or 1", never seen a 3/4.

Dirty Water
11-05-2006, 11:30 AM
The only sizes on residential that I have seen and know of are either 5/8 or 1", never seen a 3/4.

A 5/8" meter can flow between 12 to 15 gpm.

Just because it crimps down a little at that point, doesn't mean that you are limited to running a 5/8" service line. The water velocity in the meter is most likely going faster than 5 FPS.

That said, you cannot get enough water through a 5/8 meter to use a 1 1/4" line to its full potential unless you are worried about friction loss due to the length of the mainline.

Dirty Water
11-05-2006, 11:31 AM
Okey guys another stupid question. When do you run your lines to the head after yard is final top soil graded or when.
Mike

We go in before landscapes and sod a lot of times. We just stub the swing pipe up above grade. They can run it over with their rakes and it doesn't get damaged.

Then when they are about to lay sod, we come in and attach the heads and adjust.

Wet_Boots
11-05-2006, 12:03 PM
The only sizes on residential that I have seen and know of are either 5/8 or 1", never seen a 3/4.There is an official 3/4 water meter, with it's own size and flow protocols, but most water companies don't bother with them, especially since there is a 5/8~3/4 variation, with its lower pressure losses, but in the 5/8 package.

therainmaker
11-05-2006, 01:29 PM
Mike
I have dealt with many homeowners that have attempted to install their own sprinkler system, with mixed results.
If you have no experience at all but still are interested in doing it yourself :
1.) Have a proposed landscape plan.
2.) Have an experienced irrigator draw you a design from that plan and supply you with complete parts list.
3.) To assist you, consider hiring some diggers off season who may have some experience installing irrigation.
4.) All of the major sprinkler brands have a website with product info, (some will even provide simple sprinkler design).
Good luck,
Steve D. http ://thrainmaker.freepowerboards.com

Mike33
11-05-2006, 10:42 PM
We go in before landscapes and sod a lot of times. We just stub the swing pipe up above grade. They can run it over with their rakes and it doesn't get damaged.

Then when they are about to lay sod, we come in and attach the heads and adjust.
Thats pretty well the answer i was lookig for. I was kind of guessing rough grade, apply system but the big question was top soiling and rockhounding. I hydro-seed. I even thought of putting cones out ,etc., so i wouldnt damage anything. But i hated the thought of final grade and raking then dig up yard to install pipe.
Mike

londonrain
11-05-2006, 11:04 PM
A 5/8" meter can flow between 12 to 15 gpm.


The 5/8" meters in my area flow about 25gpm but we design systems at 15gpm. A 1" meter will flow 60gpm.

Mike33
11-07-2006, 07:24 PM
Mike
I have dealt with many homeowners that have attempted to install their own sprinkler system, with mixed results.
If you have no experience at all but still are interested in doing it yourself :
1.) Have a proposed landscape plan.
2.) Have an experienced irrigator draw you a design from that plan and supply you with complete parts list.
3.) To assist you, consider hiring some diggers off season who may have some experience installing irrigation.
4.) All of the major sprinkler brands have a website with product info, (some will even provide simple sprinkler design).
Good luck,
Steve D. http ://thrainmaker.freepowerboards.com
Thanks for your advise
Mike