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View Full Version : what depth for all the pipe ??


baddboygeorge
11-09-2006, 09:09 PM
do I need to put the pipe below the frost line which is 18 inches here , even if I am blowing the system out at the end of the season. If all the water is outta the line before it freezes everything should be ok rite?? Please help me out! thanks Gerorge

Dirty Water
11-09-2006, 09:17 PM
As a standard, Irrigation pipe usually goes between 10" and 14", less if your lazy.

Any deeper is a waste of time. That is why we winterize.

baddboygeorge
11-09-2006, 09:42 PM
you guys have always been a great help , thank you!! i have another question , after i trench i start laying pipe what makes up the difference between the head an the pipe to get head at proper grade! This is gonna be my first system so I wanna make sure I know all I can before I get my feet wet! how many heads to a zone? please let me know Thanks George

irritation
11-09-2006, 10:09 PM
Use swing pipe for your heads. As far as how many heads to a zone, you need to study up a little because there are too many variables.

Dirty Water
11-09-2006, 10:12 PM
George:

Read:

www.irrigationtutorials.com

COMPLETELY! Every section, continue re-reading or ask questions here on anything that doesn't make sense until you understand the entire site.

Then try your install. I'm trying to save you a very expensive headache.

Ed G
11-10-2006, 07:56 AM
give you one tip if your following the tutorials...

when it comes time to measure the diameter of your pipes, use a plastic wire tie and a permanent marker instead of a string.

The tapered end of the tie makes it easy to get under and around the pipe when it is partially buried.

DanaMac
11-10-2006, 09:57 AM
do I need to put the pipe below the frost line which is 18 inches here , even if I am blowing the system out at the end of the season. If all the water is outta the line before it freezes everything should be ok rite?? Please help me out! thanks Gerorge

Put it this way - Do you want to make repairs at 18"-36"? 10-14 inches is perfect for residentials. Oh I just loved working on commercial jobs where the trenches where dug by back hoe up to 6 or 7 feet deep, working in them which is completely over my head (I'm only 5'-9" on a good day), and it had downpoured the previous night. Nothing like mud up to your crotch. And made sure to pivot my foot down when walking our pulling my leg up - my hip kept popping out of place.

Wet_Boots
11-10-2006, 10:13 AM
What's breaking at those 6-7 foot depths? Sounds like an opportunity to make the evening news as the unnamed workman buried in a collapse.

DanaMac
11-10-2006, 10:16 AM
What's breaking at those 6-7 foot depths? Sounds like an opportunity to make the evening news as the unnamed workman buried in a collapse.
No no. This was back in my first year of irrigation working for someone else. We installed the system for the practice football fields at the Air Force academy. I think it was a 10" mainline. Funny thing was the guy I worked for and one other guy, trenched the whole perimeter for the mainline. Then when the pipe showed up, it didn't fit!!

And yes I worried about collapsing.

PurpHaze
11-10-2006, 11:19 AM
And yes I worried about collapsing.

In CA the OSHA requirement is that 5' and deeper has to be shored or "engineered trenching", i.e. depending on soil composition walls can be angled to prevent cave-ins.

Our general rule of thumb is that the larger the pipe the deeper it needs to be. This allows room for fittings, change of direction, etc. You just need more room with large diameter pipes. We put 6"-8" pipe about 30" deep, 3"-4" pipe 18"-24", etc.

justgeorge
11-13-2006, 12:09 PM
George:

Read:

www.irrigationtutorials.com

COMPLETELY! Every section, continue re-reading or ask questions here on anything that doesn't make sense until you understand the entire site.

Then try your install. I'm trying to save you a very expensive headache.

we already suggested he read that, and he obviously hasn't.

Wet_Boots
11-13-2006, 12:54 PM
As a standard, Irrigation pipe usually goes between 10" and 14", less if your lazy.Lazy (shallower) depths on poly pipe won't be a killer, except where it breaks from expected maintenance, like core aeration. When swing joints and swing pipe became the norm, I gave up on trying to force the depth to a point where a saddle tee and cut-off riser would fit beneath a head.

baddboygeorge
11-13-2006, 07:40 PM
it says riser goes between head an pipe an use as much as needed ! where do ya buy riser pipe at !!or do ya just make it! I know this may be a dumb question but this is all new to me . Anyone wanna travel over to kentucky an show me!! if so let me know Thanks George

Wet_Boots
11-13-2006, 08:56 PM
And the reason you won't work for someone else to learn the trade is.... ??

Ever consider bringing in a contractor for an installation, and just observe the goings-on?

PurpHaze
11-13-2006, 10:25 PM
Anyone wanna travel over to kentucky an show me!! if so let me know Thanks George

Is Kentucky near Missouri??? :)

baddboygeorge
11-14-2006, 01:00 AM
an would love to watch the install of a system but irrigation around here is a very hidden secret! No one wants ya too know anything!!

Wet_Boots
11-14-2006, 06:39 AM
If you hire it done, you get to watch.

Kartanimal29
11-14-2006, 07:34 PM
Golf Course
Main line : about 36 in of cover
Lats: 18 in.

Home Systems
Main Line: around 6 in
Lats: around the same

The way I see it is if your going to blow the system out don't worry abut the depth. Just make sure you blow the main out first. Starting with the last zone on the main, then blow your lats out.

I've been doing this for 14 years and never had a problem.

drmiller100
11-15-2006, 12:29 AM
George:

Read:

www.irrigationtutorials.com

headache.

so i'm kind of new at all this. i've only designed installed about 150 systems.

but the writeup was less then perfect.
The diagrams showed they didn't even single cover all of the yard.
it didn't show which way was south. Where i'm at, areas facing south require a lot more water then other areas.
The digram didn't show or discuss trees,which provide shade.
The diagram showed 1/3 circle heads running same nozzles, and water as 2/3 circle sprinkler.

If you throw enough spinklers, and water, and time, most any crappy system will keep a yard wet.

my advice
use one inch poly or pvc everywhere, and your parts list gets smaller and you pretty much don't have to worry about pressure loss in the laterals and mostly the mains, unless you go over 200 feet of main.
use saddles and swing pipe no matter what else you do
use poly pipe if it ever freezes
consider mp rotors. we've switched entirely to them. they are only good for 30 feet or so, but for flexibility and ability to mix traditional spray zones with gear drives, they are pretty cool, and in a pinch you CAN single cover.

it seems like engineers get all excited about pipe sizing. you cannot oversize pipe. run one inch pipe everywhere, and those problems pretty much go away.
It seems like engineers get excited about how you run your pipe in patterns across the yard. Keep your swing pipe runs under 5 feet, use 1 inch laterals, and the world is a simple place.
it seems like engineers worry about double coverage, but don't know which way is south or where the shade is.

Mr. Vern
11-15-2006, 01:23 AM
[QUOTE=Kartanimal29]Home Systems
Main Line: around 6 in
Lats: around the same

QUOTE]
The problem I have found with shooting for such shallow depths is that if the pipe rises prior to getting backfilled you end up way too shallow. You also run into trouble if you have multiple pipes in the same ditch. We aim for 12-16 inches and if we miss, we still have 10+ inches in almost all cases.

Wet_Boots
11-15-2006, 09:38 AM
Kartanimal29 was referring to plowed-in poly pipe, and not PVC in an open trench. Poly that lies under turf seems to endure, regardless of depth, since the turf roots form a barrier against shifting (frost and heave) - in areas without root cover, the pipes tend to shift towards the surface over time.

Kartanimal29
11-18-2006, 12:57 AM
Kartanimal29 was referring to plowed-in poly pipe, and not PVC in an open trench. Poly that lies under turf seems to endure, regardless of depth, since the turf roots form a barrier against shifting (frost and heave) - in areas without root cover, the pipes tend to shift towards the surface over time.

Correct Wet Boots. If I have to trench , even for ploy, I allways go about 7 in. more then what I need. It seems the trench never gets cleaned out to my liking and the pipe is shollow :mad: