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View Full Version : First Walkway, First Water Feature, First Wall


Youngbeginner
12-13-2006, 02:44 PM
Any tips, corrections, information is welcome. This was my first time by myself.

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KrayzKajun
12-13-2006, 03:05 PM
nice work!

PSUturf
12-13-2006, 04:47 PM
Try to avoid tiny pieces of flagstone. They almost always remove themselves from the walkway after a short time. Looks good. Did you use fine gravel with polymer in the flagstone joints?

GroundScapesIncorporated
12-13-2006, 05:12 PM
Looks very nice, as mentioned above I would have stayed away from the small peices of stone, but the qaulity looks very nice. Congrats

cedarcroft
12-13-2006, 05:16 PM
Looks excellent. Some will tell you that you should have cut the bricks more on the radius for tighter joints. either way, it looks very nice and I am sure the customer loves it. if that is your first job, you have a very bright future in this business. learn from your "mistakes", move on to the next job and keep up the good work.

BTW: Where's the water feature?

Youngbeginner
12-13-2006, 10:19 PM
Here is the water feature.

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MarcusLndscp
12-13-2006, 11:52 PM
Very unique material selection...certainly not a combo you see all the time in a walkway. Like others said the small pieces should go because they're not stable. I typically try not to use anything smaller than a 14x14 or there abouts. Your curves in the layout seem crisp and smooth which will aesthetically make or break an install. The flagstone in the walk has a very unique fractured look to it...very attractive in a way. The water feature isn't for me.....looks like an awkward location for one. It doesn't blend with it's surroundings or look like it was meant to be. All in all though if that's your first install you've got a bright future. Keep up the good work...I look forward to seeing more pics in the future!

ACutAbovesiny
12-14-2006, 12:29 AM
I agree with marcus about the water feature but over all looks great.

GreenMonster
12-14-2006, 09:52 AM
I agree with everything Marcus said... that's probably because he learned everything he knows from me.

Again, the small pieces take away from the overall quality of the install, which is good. Your curves flow very nicely.

I also agree that the water feature seems a bit displaced.

Very good effort for your first install. Keep learning and improving with every job. You definately seem to have a talent.

p.s. what were you using the 2x4 for?

DVS Hardscaper
12-14-2006, 10:06 AM
The walk and perennials look real good. Indiana has some neat stone. I was there in 1999 and noticed its quite different than what we have in western MD.

Although we have no clue as to how the base was prepared, etc.


BUT - your pond is pathetic. Nothin personal. But it looks like a pile of rock. Ponds should look natural, and mamma nature does not pile rock like that!

Youngbeginner
12-14-2006, 10:21 AM
GreenMonster-
The 1x6 in picture was used as a framing board for the walk. This didn't work as well as I hoped, any suggestions?
DVS Hardscaper-
I used a 6" base of 57's, 2" of 12's, and 1" of sand I believe, all compacted very well. I didn't originally post the pic of the water feature, because as you said it is pretty sad, but it's my first and I realized what I did wrong, and what to improve on. I was honestly thinking about that last night, it needs to be replaced by a better system, but I'll know next time.

Team-Green L&L
12-14-2006, 10:29 AM
My views are pretty much in line with DVS. It is hard to give constructive criticism on any hardscaping job without seeing the preparation before laying. It does look a lot better than our first install though. Congrats!

GreenMonster
12-14-2006, 10:37 AM
GreenMonster-
The 1x6 in picture was used as a framing board for the walk. This didn't work as well as I hoped, any suggestions?



A framing board to hold the base material in, or a framing board to hold the pavers?

For base, we don't "frame" anything in. Your base should extend out beyond the edge of either side, the same thickness as the base. So, if you have a 6" base, and a 42" wide walkway, you need an extra 6" of prepped base on either side, making your actual base 54" wide.

If you need a visual to get your curve in, you could simply use your edge restrait.

Team-Green L&L
12-14-2006, 10:44 AM
GreenMonster-
The 1x6 in picture was used as a framing board for the walk. This didn't work as well as I hoped, any suggestions?
DVS Hardscaper-
I used a 6" base of 57's, 2" of 12's, and 1" of sand I believe, all compacted very well. I didn't originally post the pic of the water feature, because as you said it is pretty sad, but it's my first and I realized what I did wrong, and what to improve on. I was honestly thinking about that last night, it needs to be replaced by a better system, but I'll know next time.

I must've missed this. WOW, no...no...no! You cannot use timbers or wood in conjuction with pavers. The wood is biodegradable and the pavers are not. Need I say more? Spray paint your lines, use string lines and a laser level for grade, and 1" pvc piping for bedding sand screeding.

I am quite confused on how you used 6" of aggregate with that excavation. I assume you were finished excavating by the cleanliness. 6" base + 1" bedding sand + 3" pavers = 10" of excavation. Let's be honest here and not post what you would've done differently.

Besides, there is no need for more than 4" of aggregate in that area unless someone plans on parking a car under their deck or you were concerned about the soil conditions. Did you take a soil analysis first? What lead up to your decision to use more base instead of geotextile to prevent settling?

I must suggest that you take the ICPI certification course BEFORE proceeding in hardscape installations!!!!!!!!!

YardPro
12-14-2006, 08:59 PM
looks good
i do like the flow of the curves of the walk... I am a stickler about the flow of curves. As said earlier, they will make or break a job.

If you want a water feature in a corner like that, try a small pondless waterfall.

Dirty Water
12-14-2006, 09:05 PM
I must've missed this. WOW, no...no...no! You cannot use timbers or wood in conjuction with pavers. The wood is biodegradable and the pavers are not. Need I say more? Spray paint your lines, use string lines and a laser level for grade, and 1" pvc piping for bedding sand screeding.

I am quite confused on how you used 6" of aggregate with that excavation. I assume you were finished excavating by the cleanliness. 6" base + 1" bedding sand + 3" pavers = 10" of excavation. Let's be honest here and not post what you would've done differently.

Besides, there is no need for more than 4" of aggregate in that area unless someone plans on parking a car under their deck or you were concerned about the soil conditions. Did you take a soil analysis first? What lead up to your decision to use more base instead of geotextile to prevent settling?

I must suggest that you take the ICPI certification course BEFORE proceeding in hardscape installations!!!!!!!!!

In all honesty, why don't you avoid being overly critical until you have posted a redeeming hardscape. This one looks a hundred times better than that nightmare you posted a few months back.

Youngbeginner
12-14-2006, 10:28 PM
GreenMonster- I used the timber as temporary rough forms for the base, which was 3" outside the pavers, then they where removed. Thank you very much for the information, next time I will extend the base further.
Team-Green L&L- I used an overly thick base because I wanted it to last. The pre-existing walk that was once there had failed (not my work). I am currently looking into getting my certification, but I am also juggling 18 credit hours at Purdue. Thanks for the advice.

Thanks,
Landon

Allure
12-14-2006, 10:36 PM
Young - all in all a very impressive start to your career. You seem to have very good design skills. Great curves & material choices, nice plantings.

I agree that the fountain looks awkward & as Yardpro said a pond-less waterfall would fit the space better.

Good luck with school!

Youngbeginner
12-14-2006, 10:42 PM
I'm sorry if I implied that the fountain feeds a pond. It is actually a pondless "creek" if you will that disappears into the rocks (into a pump well).

Team-Green L&L
12-15-2006, 11:56 AM
GreenMonster- I used the timber as temporary rough forms for the base, which was 3" outside the pavers, then they where removed. Thank you very much for the information, next time I will extend the base further.
Team-Green L&L- I used an overly thick base because I wanted it to last. The pre-existing walk that was once there had failed (not my work). I am currently looking into getting my certification, but I am also juggling 18 credit hours at Purdue. Thanks for the advice.

Thanks,
Landon

I just wanted to apologize if I sound overly-critical to you. I didn't mean to offend some random guy, but I guess I did.

Just to explain, I am not a landscaper by trade like most of the guys on here. I do multiple other functions which primarily involve risk assessing in many areas of our company. I will probably always sound critical, but I do not mean any harm by it.

We all learn from mistakes and I have made plenty of them. The knowledge I share on here was taught to me as I made mistakes and learned. My only advantage over most of these guys is a background in marketing (not in landscaping). I was only certified recently also. That is why all the specs are fresh in my mind.

Well, I defended myself. Now you can have your thread back...

Team-Green L&L
12-15-2006, 11:58 AM
In all honesty, why don't you avoid being overly critical until you have posted a redeeming hardscape. This one looks a hundred times better than that nightmare you posted a few months back.

I just wanted to apologize if I sound overly-critical to you. I didn't mean to offend some random guy, but I guess I did.

Just to explain, I am not a landscaper by trade like most of the guys on here. I do multiple other functions which primarily involve risk assessing in many areas of our company. I will probably always sound critical, but I do not mean any harm by it.

We all learn from mistakes and I have made plenty of them. The knowledge I share on here was taught to me as I made mistakes and learned. My only advantage over most of these guys is a background in marketing (not in landscaping). I was only certified recently also. That is why all the specs are fresh in my mind.

Well, I defended myself. Now you can have your thread back...

waltero
12-15-2006, 01:46 PM
Check out the following web site, lots of good info that you can read about until you get certified.

http://www.pavingexpert.com/

DVS Hardscaper
12-15-2006, 05:44 PM
Not to stir the pot,

Technically, one can construct a walkway, patio, etc, using any material imagionable.

As long as it holds up - thats all that matters. Doesn't matter if it's wood, steel, plastic, globs of wax, etc. If the builder has the inguenity(sp) to make it work - then thats fantastic!

Do any of you know of any welders / fabricators? Sure, they have nothing to do with pavement construction, but my point is a good fabricator can create ANYTHING they desire.

And so can a person constructing a walkway.



Years ago we had a prospective client whom wanted their pavers mortared to a concrete slab. Concrete pavers. Not clay pavers. I tried to explain that concrete pavers are intended to be dryset. The lady thought I was feeding her a bunch of B.S, and trying to pull the wool over their eyes. So she gets real aggitated and says "XYZ Stone said you can mortar pavers to concrete".

And sure you can. No two ways about it. Heck, you can also mortar quarter dollars to a concrete slab if one so desires.

If you can make it happen and make it last - GO FOR IT!

jrc lawncare
12-15-2006, 06:09 PM
A framing board to hold the base material in, or a framing board to hold the pavers?

For base, we don't "frame" anything in. Your base should extend out beyond the edge of either side, the same thickness as the base. So, if you have a 6" base, and a 42" wide walkway, you need an extra 6" of prepped base on either side, making your actual base 54" wide.

If you need a visual to get your curve in, you could simply use your edge restrait. Exactly what the ICPI traing course instructors said...PS, a side note, looking at some pics of your work, very nice.

kootoomootoo
12-15-2006, 06:11 PM
Just when you think you have seen it all.

Guy posts his first work and I'll say it ....looks awesome..........but of course some ICPI knowitall discredits the job.

About the only thing you are discrediting is ICPI itself. Thanks Jon.

I would have tried to sell maybe having that pond go underneath the walkway and out the other side. Maybe add a bridge. Really go to town if you wanted to. Design/ Material/ Plantings look great and I see why........Landscape Architecture, PURDUE UNIVERSITY

cutbetterthanyou
12-15-2006, 10:31 PM
a am sorry a am new to lawnsite but how can i view your pic i cant see any water feture or anything just the small pic by your name

Team-Green L&L
12-15-2006, 10:47 PM
a am sorry a am new to lawnsite but how can i view your pic i cant see any water feture or anything just the small pic by your name

They're on Page 1

cutbetterthanyou
12-16-2006, 01:59 AM
not on my computer there are no pics of anything just what people wrote

Youngbeginner
12-16-2006, 02:29 AM
cutbetterthanyou-
I'm sorry if you cannot see the pictures, it seems to work on everyone else's computer. Don't worry, the water feature wasn't that big of a hit :laugh: !

To everyone else, thank you for all of the advice, I've definitely got some great comments, both positive and negative, that I will remember for my next job. I am open for more help if it's out there. Thank you.

Landon

hoskm01
12-17-2006, 03:55 AM
a am sorry a am new to lawnsite but how can i view your pic i cant see any water feture or anything just the small pic by your name


Sometimes with Microsoft, it won't let you see pictures on a page if you don't use any punctuation or correct spelling in your posts. I would try that first, and if that doesn't work, take your computer to a shop for repairs.