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View Full Version : Too much for a F-150 to carry?


DFW Area Landscaper
12-19-2006, 11:24 AM
I have measured, and I can just barely fit two Lesco 50 Gal spray rigs in the bed, side by side.

Additionally, I'd like to be able to carry around 20 bags (50 lbs ea) in the bed as well.

I was thiking of installing some leaf spring helpers to help keep it from sagging on the rear too much.

Anyone think this is insanely stupid to carry this much weight in an F-150?

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper

Total.Lawn.Care
12-19-2006, 11:42 AM
I would say that just the weight of the water (100 Gals @ 8lbs per gallon) with the additional 1000 lbs of bags is pushing the limit of an F-150 payload and you have not even figured the weight of the tanks, pumps and additional accessories that you would need to carry along. Check the manuals payload capacity of the truck, if you can stay under that and keep the load stable you might be okay, however I think you would be better off moving up to a 3/4 ton truck for carrying that much water and additional weight.

If you do not carry that many extra bags, may 10-15 bags instead of 20, you would probably be okay with some helper springs. If you decide to use the F-150, invest in heavier duty brakes to handle stopping that load on a regular basis.

LindblomRJ
12-19-2006, 11:48 AM
That a lot of weight, I believe you would better off with a 3/4 or even 1 ton. Total load with supplies and equipment is close to 2500 LBS.

If you insist on using a 1/2 ton. Make sure the suspension, brakes, and tires are up to the job.

DFW Area Landscaper
12-19-2006, 12:02 PM
There wouldn't be very many miles with the max weight. It is unlikely that both tanks would be full in the morning when they leave the shop with 20 bags of fert. We fill our 50 gal tanks at the client's house from their spiggot when the tank runs dry.

The price of a F-250 is MUCh more than the price of the F-150. I won't consider buying any more used work trucks. New only from here on out for me.

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper

Shopkeeper
12-19-2006, 03:13 PM
There wouldn't be very many miles with the max weight. It is unlikely that both tanks would be full in the morning when they leave the shop with 20 bags of fert. We fill our 50 gal tanks at the client's house from their spiggot when the tank runs dry.

The price of a F-250 is MUCh more than the price of the F-150. I won't consider buying any more used work trucks. New only from here on out for me.

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper

I know you said that the price of an F250 is much more than that of an F150, but let me ask you this...how much more are you going to have to pay if something goes horribly wrong with an over-loaded F150? Not only money, but you will be feel guilty the rest of your life if you hurt/kill someone.

LindblomRJ
12-19-2006, 05:23 PM
The amount of miles is moot. The fact that the tanks are filled at the customers house is moot. The fact that there is more than enough weight with equipment and 1/2 ton of fertilizer to overload a F-150. I would assume the fert would be toward the back half the truck, putting most of the weight over the axle or behind the axle makes for a dangerous situation.

The 3/4 would be better for safety and a better investment in equipment for the task you are using it for.

pclawncare
12-19-2006, 08:58 PM
I know you dont want to spend any more money but i would go with a 3/4 ton or even with a 1 ton duely because water is not a that stable of a load and if you have a blow out or something go wrong you are not depending on a single tire

Accu-cut Lawn Care
12-19-2006, 09:02 PM
I have measured, and I can just barely fit two Lesco 50 Gal spray rigs in the bed, side by side.

Additionally, I'd like to be able to carry around 20 bags (50 lbs ea) in the bed as well.

I was thiking of installing some leaf spring helpers to help keep it from sagging on the rear too much.

Anyone think this is insanely stupid to carry this much weight in an F-150?

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper
You'll be fine. Just beef up your leaf springs. Not only is your 150 strong enough to haul that load...just think of all the gas you'll be saving when you compare it to a 3/4 or 1 ton.

LindblomRJ
12-19-2006, 09:15 PM
You'll be fine. Just beef up your leaf springs. Not only is your 150 strong enough to haul that load...just think of all the gas you'll be saving when you compare it to a 3/4 or 1 ton.
Your fuel savings will not that great. F-150 with a 5.4 or F-250 with 5.4 same motor, same power... 1 or 2 MPG difference.

Accu-cut Lawn Care
12-19-2006, 09:28 PM
Your fuel savings will not that great. F-150 with a 5.4 or F-250 with 5.4 same motor, same power... 1 or 2 MPG difference.
My 94 chevy 3500 srw got 7 mpg loaded(with an easy foot)...my dodge gets 14 mpg hauli the same load...add it up.

LindblomRJ
12-19-2006, 11:45 PM
My 94 chevy 3500 srw got 7 mpg loaded(with an easy foot)...my dodge gets 14 mpg hauli the same load...add it up.
That is truly funny. If you were comparing a 1500 Chevrolet to a 3500 Chevrolet I would see your point.

However a dodge and Chevrolet are two total different creatures.

My 96 K2500 with 350 engine gets 14 to 16 MPG with a load.

Your reasoning is bogus.

hosejockey2002
12-20-2006, 01:16 AM
If you are buying a new truck and keeping it for a significant length of time, the F150 will end up costing you more in the long run in faster wear and tear and decreased reliability. It sounds as though you will be hauling this load on a regular basis. Any machine that's overloaded on a regular basis will wear out and break much faster. You'll save money by getting a truck designed to haul the load you want to haul. If you must have an F150 for insurance or whatever reasons, you can order one with the 8200 GVWR package, which gives you a 4.10 rear axle, 7 lug wheels and a 10.25 inch ring gear in the rear axle. This model has a payload of close to 3000 lbs. The downside is that the truck costs nearly as much as an F250.

Accu-cut Lawn Care
12-20-2006, 01:36 AM
That is truly funny. If you were comparing a 1500 Chevrolet to a 3500 Chevrolet I would see your point.

However a dodge and Chevrolet are two total different creatures.

My 96 K2500 with 350 engine gets 14 to 16 MPG with a load.

Your reasoning is bogus.
The mountain air must be getting to you. There is no way that your 2500 gets 16 miles a gallon loaded...unless you were driving down a big hill, had a hurricane at your back, or were hauling around a bunch of toy tools. With the gas prices and fuel shortages we are facing, we need to be smarter about what and how we drive. This means that there is no need to haul around a tsc trailer with a 36" walk behind on it behind a v-10 f 350. I pulled two ztr's around for three years behind an s-10 with a 4.3 v-6 and had absolutely no mechanical problems. 1800 lbs(usually lighter) in the back of dfw's f-150 will end up saving (making) him money now, and in the long run.

pclawncare
12-20-2006, 02:29 AM
I pulled two ztr's around for three years behind an s-10 with a 4.3 v-6 and had absolutely no mechanical problems. 1800 lbs(usually lighter) in the back of dfw's f-150 will end up saving (making) him money now, and in the long run.

Hold on we are talking about 2 totaly different things than you are talking about. 1800 pounds on a trailer that means the trailer is taking most of the weight of the load. I do not doubt that his f 150 could pull 1800 # on a trailer but everyone else on here is talking about 1800# in the bed of the pick up meaning that the truck is taking all the weight and stress of the load and pulling the entire weight of the load. For example you can put 20,000 pounds on a trailer and pull it with a 1 ton, but would you put 20,000 pounds in the bed of that same truck and expect it to hold? it

dfischer
12-20-2006, 03:05 AM
A few thoughts:

1) If you don't respect equipment and avoid operating them at or near their limits they will break. New or used.

2) Do I think it's a good idea? No, I think it will cost you money in time, BS, and repairs bills over denied warranty claims.

3) Can it do it? Yes. Simply buy the f-150 std cab w/the heavy duty payload package (thicker frame, stronger axles, etc..). Or go check for yourself. Payload specs are on the ford website...

LindblomRJ
12-20-2006, 09:20 AM
The mountain air must be getting to you. There is no way that your 2500 gets 16 miles a gallon loaded...unless you were driving down a big hill, had a hurricane at your back, or were hauling around a bunch of toy tools. With the gas prices and fuel shortages we are facing, we need to be smarter about what and how we drive. This means that there is no need to haul around a tsc trailer with a 36" walk behind on it behind a v-10 f 350. I pulled two ztr's around for three years behind an s-10 with a 4.3 v-6 and had absolutely no mechanical problems. 1800 lbs(usually lighter) in the back of dfw's f-150 will end up saving (making) him money now, and in the long run.

Mountain air? The altitude is 1700 feet where I live.

You are still missing the point. Last spring I delivered a grave stone 100 mile round trip to deliver and setup. My F-150 (1979 Ford 300 six) got 15 MPG.

The funny thing. You still can't give me a good argument. The best mileage I could ever get with a 1/2 ton Ford with 302 2wd was 16MPG. 12MPG with a 4x4 that was 2 years newer. Generally loaded my 3/4 gets 13MPG. Driving around town, and heavy right foot.

The worst mileage with the 3/4 chevrolet I have recorded was 7 MPG hauling a 1950 International L150 firetruck. Truck weight of 7100 LBS. The was fighting a 20 to 30 MPH headwind.

The case when I got 16MPG with the 3/4 Chevrolet. I delivered and installed a grave stone, and then went down the road another 100 miles to pickup 5 precast concrete pads to return home with.


Fuel shortages? Where do you live? $3.15 a gallon fuel. Yes been there done that.

Accu-cut Lawn Care
12-20-2006, 10:07 AM
Hold on we are talking about 2 totaly different things than you are talking about. 1800 pounds on a trailer that means the trailer is taking most of the weight of the load. I do not doubt that his f 150 could pull 1800 # on a trailer but everyone else on here is talking about 1800# in the bed of the pick up meaning that the truck is taking all the weight and stress of the load and pulling the entire weight of the load. For example you can put 20,000 pounds on a trailer and pull it with a 1 ton, but would you put 20,000 pounds in the bed of that same truck and expect it to hold? it
I was using that as an example. I know that we are tallking about 1800 in the bed of his truck.

Accu-cut Lawn Care
12-20-2006, 10:19 AM
Mountain air? The altitude is 1700 feet where I live.

You are still missing the point. Last spring I delivered a grave stone 100 mile round trip to deliver and setup. My F-150 (1979 Ford 300 six) got 15 MPG.

The funny thing. You still can't give me a good argument.
Fuel shortages? Where do you live? $3.15 a gallon fuel. Yes been there done that.
You need to go back to bed. Plainly and simply, if dfw decides to get the f-250 he will spend almost twice as much in gas as with a half ton. If he drives 400 miles a week; The 250(@10mpg) will cost him 40 gallons a week(or $120).The 150(@16mpg's) will cost 25 gal per week($75). Over a year's span, that's $6240 to gas up the 250 versus $3900 for the 150. Not to mention the fact that oil changes and maintenance are way more expensive of the 250.

LindblomRJ
12-20-2006, 10:46 AM
You need to go back to bed. Plainly and simply, if dfw decides to get the f-250 he will spend almost twice as much in gas as with a half ton. If he drives 400 miles a week; The 250(@10mpg) will cost him 40 gallons a week(or $120).The 150(@16mpg's) will cost 25 gal per week($75). Over a year's span, that's $6240 to gas up the 250 versus $3900 for the 150. Not to mention the fact that oil changes and maintenance are way more expensive of the 250.
You got to do better than throwing lack of sleep and Hypoxia at me. 5.4 will hold the same amount of oil, if it is the 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton.

A brand new ford 3/4 ton will cost $26,000. A half ton with 8000 GVW will be about the same price.

Your argument about the mileage is not accurate. The examples you have given I believe I have refuted, plain and simple. A F-150 with a 5.4 and F-250 with 5.4 will similar mileage. At least that is what I have run into with 1/2 and 3/4 chevrolets.

One also has to consider gear ratio's and transmission. For the use at hand - application of chemicals and fertilizers, the weight will be static for the most part. Repairs on the 1/2 would seem eat up your all important fuel savings. Suspension (even with the investment in extra leaf spring), breaks, and transmissions, it seams logical that repairs would be extra due to the fact using the equipment at or maybe beyond the rating of the vehicle.

The other part of the my argument for 3/4 safety, and resale a F-150 that is beat the pieces will bring less than a 3/4 that did the same duty but is well within design limits.

BTW I have been able to respond without accusing anyone of hypoxia and lack of sleep. I simply stated your reasoning is flawed. I stated what I believe, why I believe it, and how I have arrived at my conclusions.

DFW Area Landscaper
12-20-2006, 11:18 AM
The dry spray rigs are 325 lbs each. Worst case scenario, I'd have:

20 bags fert = 1,000 lbs
100 gals of water = 800 lbs
2 spray rigs = 650 lbs

Total: 2,450 lbs

In the past, we have carried 12 bags of fert with a full tank and the spray rig, which is 1,325 in the bed of my Nissan Frontier. No problems at all.

The mileage is another factor to consider. This truck would be used exclusively as a fert & squirt truck. We make six apps per year. Rounds one and six are liquid only so we wouldn't have any fert. Rounds 3 & 4 are granular only, so the tanks would be empty. Only rounds 2 & 5 are both granular and tank mix. But round 5 would be one mixture only. Only during round 2 would we need both tanks full AND fertilizer in the bed of the truck. Additionally, our mowing trucks only get about 5,500 miles per year. This fert & squirt truck will probably only see about 2,000 miles per year and that is it.

I am pretty sure I am gonna get leaf springs with a standard 4.6L F-150. I think it'll be fine. I'll just have to tell my driver that during round 2, he'll only be able to carry 10 bags of fert and come back to the shop for more when he runs out. I will install the two spray rigs with the hose real by the tail gate and the wieght of the tanks would pretty much be on top of the tires. The fert bags would be carried directly behind the cab.

Later,
DFW Area Landscaper

LindblomRJ
12-20-2006, 11:30 AM
erased ....

T.E.
12-20-2006, 03:03 PM
I say we all argue till the last breath! :dizzy: Come on guys, Merry Christmas.

LindblomRJ
12-20-2006, 03:16 PM
I say we all argue till the last breath! :dizzy:.
I'm up for it.:)

wfdmilo
12-21-2006, 01:38 AM
I haul 200 gallons of fuel and 4 skid loader wheels in my 97 f-150 when we're plowing snow. If I set up another one, I wouldn't do it this way, but I'm just using what we've got.

It does have helper springs.

Chop Stuff Up
12-21-2006, 03:33 AM
to some degree a v6 pulling a heavy load is gonna burn more fuel than a v10 pulling a heavy load.

for comparison on the chevy mialage topic, I average 12 mpg with my 92 2500 w/ 350.

Total.Lawn.Care
12-21-2006, 09:33 AM
Here are the payload specifications for a 2005 F-150 with different engine options. I assume that this being a work truck, it would be a regular cab with 8ft bed. With a 5.4 V-8, your payload capacity would be 2050 lbs and your total GVWR is 7050. The F-250 with the same engine and regular cab, long bed setup gives you a payload of 3200 lbs with a GVWR of 8800 lbs. You can probably do it with the F-150, but even carrying light on the fert, the weight of the tanks and the water keep you pretty close to 80-90% of max payload. It will cause more wear and tear, especially on brakes, bearings, other driveline components and engine and tranny cooling capabilities. The F-250 is built for this payload and will have less issues with maint and repair and overall cost less to operate. I still recommend the F-250, however it is your call and the 150 will do, just may not give the best service onver the long term.

Weight and Towing (Pounds)

Regular Cab SuperCab SuperCrew

6ft 8ft 5ft 6ft 8ft 5ft
4x2 4x4 4x2 4x4 4x2 4x4 4x2 4x4 4x2 4x4 4x2 4x4


WEIGHT

Base curb Weight


4.2L 4615 - 4747 - - - - - - - - -
4.6L 4708 5004 4840 5138 4979 4297 5065 5363 - - 5176 5476

5.4L 4811 5109 4944 5241 5151 5452 5169 5471 - - 5281 5577

5.4L payload pkg - - 5125 5413 - - - - 5501 5849 - -

Payload capacity
4.2L 1830 - 1850 - - - - - - - - -
4.6L 1890 1740 1910 1760 1620 1570 1580 1530 - - 1570 1360

5.4L 1790 1680 2050 1650 1740 1640 1820 1670 - - 1710 1560

5.4L payload pkg - - 3020 2670 - - - - 2640 2290 - -
GVWR

4.2L 6500 - 6650 - - - - - - - - -
4.6L 6650 6800 6800 6950 6650 6900 6700 6950 - - 6800 6900

5.4L 6650 6850 7050 6950 6950 7150 7050 7200 - - 7050 7200

5.4L payload pkg - - 8200 8200 - - - - 8200 8200 - -