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Grass-Masters
01-02-2007, 11:50 AM
Lately, me and my wife have been talking about making a move to an area in the south were it is nicer year round. Here in the detroit area it looks like the bottom is falling out with the economy and does not look like it is going to get any better.

I am interested to see what areas people are making a good income on lawncare, I know there is good money in landscaping in many places. I would like to know what people are getting for standard 1/4 acre lots just to cut. I am aware prices will be based on a number of factors, but for example this will be a home based start up lco with little overhead so I am looking for realistic answers to see were in the country there may be a good place to make a move. I would also be interested in knowing if you were to move and start all over again, were would you go and why.

All I need to know is price per cut average, and what major city you are near (example phoenix, las vegas, dallas, houston, atlanta, ect.........) Thank you in advance for your help if you have any input.

jeffex
01-02-2007, 04:21 PM
if I were going to move I would get a list of lawn care businesses for sale in several target areas. Try calling some LCOs in an area you target and give them a phoney description of your property and see if they will give you a ball park price. Keep in mind caller Id will show you out of town so get a story that says your moving there soon. Starting from 0 customers is tough enough in your own neighborhood. I would try and buy a small business or some accounts so you can make something while you build clients through time. I would call on repair shops to see if they know something about businesses for sale and how the market is. The problem you'll find is people who lie or will not give an outsider the whole truth. Its a big step that I plan to make when I retire from my full time job but I will have an income to back up my start up. Richard Martin did just that this year maybe he will chime in. Don't expect too many here to invite another competetor into their market by giving away too much info. Good luck!

Duekster
01-02-2007, 04:40 PM
Dallas Texas 1/5 ac to 1/4 acre lots with less than 3000 SF of Grass is a typical $25 for mow and blow.

I am commercial and don't do res.

laylow1994
01-02-2007, 05:00 PM
well im in tampa florida and the going price for mow blow and go about $75-$100 month

HOOLIE
01-02-2007, 05:16 PM
You can easily get $35+ for a 5k lot here in the DC 'burbs...however it's a very expensive area to live in, you could likely do better overall elsewhere...

Plus there's already too many of us here anyway :laugh:

tacoma200
01-02-2007, 05:44 PM
well im in tampa florida and the going price for mow blow and go about $75-$100 month

How many times do you mow a month in the Tampa area during growing season? Summer? Winter?

Fantasy Lawns
01-02-2007, 05:51 PM
At a typical 42 cuts in season @ $75 is $21.42 per cut ..... YIKES .... coarse if that's truely mow-blow (no edging-weed eating) ya can pop em out 3-5 per hr .... these are like 2K in turf size

barefootlawnsandlandscape
01-02-2007, 06:43 PM
In this area I can get $35/cut on a typical 1/4 acre lot no problem. There are a lot of 1-3 acre lot subdivisions that I will be targeting this next year. This is a great place to start up. Low cost of living and lots of money in the area due to Wal-Mart and all the Wal-Mart vendors, not to mention it is a beautiful area. If you do a good job, are reliable, and advertise you will get plenty of work here. I went from purchasing 35 accounts in March '06 to having 85 accounts by October '06 and have 115 total as of now to start '07 off with.

carcrz
01-02-2007, 07:10 PM
In this area I can get $35/cut on a typical 1/4 acre lot no problem. There are a lot of 1-3 acre lot subdivisions that I will be targeting this next year. This is a great place to start up. Low cost of living and lots of money in the area due to Wal-Mart and all the Wal-Mart vendors, not to mention it is a beautiful area. If you do a good job, are reliable, and advertise you will get plenty of work here. I went from purchasing 35 accounts in March '06 to having 85 accounts by October '06 and have 115 total as of now to start '07 off with.

I'd say it is probably pretty comparable here. The only problem I have seen here is the likelihood of having things stolen. Even in the ritzy areas, there are still shady people driving around looking for an opportunity.

One other thing to look at is the number of companies that are catering to the areas you are looking at. There are a lot of mowing companies here - both full time & part time.

d&rlawncare
01-02-2007, 08:10 PM
Find out the highest/fastest growing areas in the US and target the areas your interested in.

LawnTamer
01-02-2007, 09:15 PM
Not here.
You can get a decent $30-35/cut here, but everyone and their dog has a trailer and a couple of mowers. This fall I was at a light in a suburban neighborhood, there were 5 vehicles at the light, 4 of us were mowing rigs.

Duekster
01-02-2007, 09:17 PM
Yeap, we have the same in Texas which is why I only do commercial. It cost more to operate but frankly less TDH out there.

Jpocket
01-02-2007, 09:50 PM
The business is saturated where ever you may go. Up here every Fireman, or Sate and roads employee is a landscaper after 2:00pm. You go south Im sure every red neck with a pick-up is a Landscaper. If you go west I would figure the same thing.

Its tough everywhere, but I would think the southeast would be alittle easier with less regulations and lower cost of living.

MJK
01-02-2007, 10:34 PM
Man i hear you caruso_services, i'm probably right down the street from you in Washington TWP, and the larger companies are eating me up. There getting desperate when it comes to keeping there guys busy. I tried to focus on Landscape installs but i've lost 4 out of the last 5 to (well i wont say there names but there located on Van Dyke between 28 and 29 mile roads, by Rocks Roots).

DuraCutter
01-02-2007, 10:59 PM
Lately, me and my wife have been talking about making a move to an area in the south were it is nicer year round. Here in the detroit area it looks like the bottom is falling out with the economy and does not look like it is going to get any better.

I am interested to see what areas people are making a good income on lawncare, I know there is good money in landscaping in many places. I would like to know what people are getting for standard 1/4 acre lots just to cut. I am aware prices will be based on a number of factors, but for example this will be a home based start up lco with little overhead so I am looking for realistic answers to see were in the country there may be a good place to make a move. I would also be interested in knowing if you were to move and start all over again, were would you go and why.

All I need to know is price per cut average, and what major city you are near (example phoenix, las vegas, dallas, houston, atlanta, ect.........) Thank you in advance for your help if you have any input.


Why limit yourself to being an lco. That's the way I started a long time ago, but now lawncare is only a way to get at the other "profitable" work. I learnt how to do dekmaster decks on the internet years ago and now we're already booking for decks in spring. We're doing them now in freezing temperatures in Canada...lol ... of coursel with tarps and propane :dizzy:

But seriously, it's just one thing I do and I got most of those contacts from doing lawns. An example is a team of 2 will easily pocket you over $1,500 a day after all costs. Been doing that for years and just did it for the last 7 days. We have a cube van booked for 4 months already in spring for doing decks. And it's not that hard and it pays like tons more money than cutting lawns and there very little competition and whatever competition you may have is running off their feet doing decks... anyways, just a thought. Why are you limiting yourself..? Maybe there's a reason....:waving:

Grass-Masters
01-02-2007, 11:50 PM
Wow- I posted this this morning and logged on to a bunch of responses. Keep them coming, I am not really limited to area, if I move I would like to move to a nice area where I can work. I know most areas are saturated with competition, but if the people have money. I don't mind other companies.

Man i hear you caruso_services, i'm probably right down the street from you in Washington TWP, and the larger companies are eating me up. There getting desperate when it comes to keeping there guys busy. I tried to focus on Landscape installs but i've lost 4 out of the last 5 to (well i wont say there names but there located on Van Dyke between 28 and 29 mile roads, by Rocks Roots).

Yea I will agree, this area is being over run by a few large companies, My prices are not that high and it can still be hard to get work. I just don't see it getting better any time soon.

Why limit yourself to being an lco. That's the way I started a long time ago, but now lawncare is only a way to get at the other "profitable" work. I learnt how to do dekmaster decks on the internet years ago and now we're already booking for decks in spring. We're doing them now in freezing temperatures in Canada...lol ... of coursel with tarps and propane :dizzy:

But seriously, it's just one thing I do and I got most of those contacts from doing lawns. An example is a team of 2 will easily pocket you over $1,500 a day after all costs. Been doing that for years and just did it for the last 7 days. We have a cube van booked for 4 months already in spring for doing decks. And it's not that hard and it pays like tons more money than cutting lawns and there very little competition and whatever competition you may have is running off their feet doing decks... anyways, just a thought. Why are you limiting yourself..? Maybe there's a reason....:waving:

I do alot more than cut lawns, we also have a builders license. But if the economy gets much worse, it won't matter what you do nobody has money to spend right now. They are expecting another 250,000 layoffs in the next few years. I am interested in the lawncare aspect because it is an easy way to get your foot in the front door for other things, and you can get an income fairly quickly......:waving:

tjsquickcuts
01-03-2007, 12:01 AM
Here in Atlanta, 1/4 acre goes anywhere from $35 to $50 bucks, just depending what area of town you are working and your rep.....I have a 28 lawn mtce visit program, with a 7 visit squirt and fert program. This works well for me because it gives me time for landscaping, aeration, and other misc things during the early and late springs....mowing bi-weekly during the spring, and fall, and weekly during the summer.....My average account is about $150 monthly....that includes the weekly service for the summer also....just spread it out to keep a consistant service price for the year.....

Grass-Masters
01-03-2007, 12:13 AM
Here in Atlanta, 1/4 acre goes anywhere from $35 to $50 bucks, just depending what area of town you are working and your rep.....I have a 28 lawn mtce visit program, with a 7 visit squirt and fert program. This works well for me because it gives me time for landscaping, aeration, and other misc things during the early and late springs....mowing bi-weekly during the spring, and fall, and weekly during the summer.....My average account is about $150 monthly....that includes the weekly service for the summer also....just spread it out to keep a consistant service price for the year.....

Atlanta is one of the areas I would like to move to, I hear it is beautiful down there year round. And you guys are making good money, I am in the wrong place.

HOOLIE
01-03-2007, 12:40 AM
From what I've seen on here, either move to an economically-healthy northern area where you get the regular mowing as well as fairly reliable plowing, or move far enough south as to where you can work more or less year-round in some capacity. Problem in the DC area is, it's far enough south where snow removal most years is not a huge money-maker, yet it's far enough north where maintenance shuts down over the winter unless you do a lot of commercial work. Although right now I still have a couple weeks of work lined up...

Grass-Masters
01-03-2007, 12:45 AM
From what I've seen on here, either move to an economically-healthy northern area where you get the regular mowing as well as fairly reliable plowing, or move far enough south as to where you can work more or less year-round in some capacity. Problem in the DC area is, it's far enough south where snow removal most years is not a huge money-maker, yet it's far enough north where maintenance shuts down over the winter unless you do a lot of commercial work. Although right now I still have a couple weeks of work lined up...

Yea, if I am going to move it will be somewhere warm year round. born and raised in michigan, some sunshine sounds good.

HOOLIE
01-03-2007, 12:51 AM
Yea, if I am going to move it will be somewhere warm year round. born and raised in michigan, some sunshine sounds good.

Yeah well Atlanta might work...we had family there for awhile, we'd go visit over the winter and you'd see crews out planting flowers in January. I don't know if it's year-round but the offseason is fairly short. Hilly though...buy a hydro if you don't have one already :laugh:

tjsquickcuts
01-03-2007, 02:26 AM
Atlanta is booming right now.....Just talking with different builders, they are expecting this boom to continue for at least the next 15 to 20 years before we reach a peak.....They are building on every corner.....You would be amazed at how much growth is going on in Atlanta and surrounding burbs.....I only work in neighborhoods ranging from 300k and up....and cost of living is on the moderate side compared to other major cities and thats another thing thats helping spark growth. I mean the same home and acreage in Miami is going to be at least 2 to 3 hundred thousand more, but you do have nice weather year round, and the beach so I guess thats the compensation for paying more....Oh, and Dont get me wrong, there are a lot of LCO here, but many do shabby work and aren't reliable.....Oh, and not to mention, a lot of LCO might take a serious blow because they have really turned up the heat in some areas on illegals, and thats hurt a lot of LCO.....But I am sure there are other cities that are booming as well, Scottsdale Az. I here is booming......Not sure if thats to far or not....

Grass-Masters
01-03-2007, 11:17 AM
I do like the sound of atlanta, but arizona is another great option I am looking at. How long is the normal season in georgia. I will have to check the cost of living in these areas to see which would be more reasonable as well.

Team-Green L&L
01-03-2007, 12:52 PM
I lived in ATL half my life and just moved back to Ohio 3 years ago. The costs of living are triple that of Ohio. There is tax on just about everything (even food) and rent for a nice 1-bed can run in upwards of $1000 month. North ATL with be every bit of that, if not more. The economy is flourishing, but the pace is miles faster. Also, landscaping is different down there. The soil is much different than any other region of the country and the mulch types used (pine) will last for years, so the mulching income becomes minimal.

The season is 8 months, but the demands are high. I cannot make the suggestion to relocate a landscaping or LCO company to ATL. The industry is full and the competition is incredible! The suburbs of ATL (Buckhead, Buford, Roswell, and Marietta) will have some work, but your mortgage will beat you up. The average income in North ATL is $130,000 annually. Average!

I would research the industry in whatever area you are looking to relocate. Can the area support another LCO, etc.?

ed2hess
01-03-2007, 03:18 PM
I
The average income in North ATL is $130,000 annually. Average!
.?
Every big city has that situation and they also have people making $13,000 in trailers withing a 20 minute drive.

Grass-Masters
01-03-2007, 05:14 PM
I lived in ATL half my life and just moved back to Ohio 3 years ago. The costs of living are triple that of Ohio. There is tax on just about everything (even food) and rent for a nice 1-bed can run in upwards of $1000 month. North ATL with be every bit of that, if not more. The economy is flourishing, but the pace is miles faster. Also, landscaping is different down there. The soil is much different than any other region of the country and the mulch types used (pine) will last for years, so the mulching income becomes minimal.

The season is 8 months, but the demands are high. I cannot make the suggestion to relocate a landscaping or LCO company to ATL. The industry is full and the competition is incredible! The suburbs of ATL (Buckhead, Buford, Roswell, and Marietta) will have some work, but your mortgage will beat you up. The average income in North ATL is $130,000 annually. Average!

I would research the industry in whatever area you are looking to relocate. Can the area support another LCO, etc.?



I understand, and I do not think any area needs another lco. But at the same time, I don't think I need michigans problems anymore either. Thanks for all the info, it is much needed and appreciated.

tjsquickcuts
01-03-2007, 06:01 PM
I lived in ATL half my life and just moved back to Ohio 3 years ago. The costs of living are triple that of Ohio. There is tax on just about everything (even food) and rent for a nice 1-bed can run in upwards of $1000 month. North ATL with be every bit of that, if not more. The economy is flourishing, but the pace is miles faster. Also, landscaping is different down there. The soil is much different than any other region of the country and the mulch types used (pine) will last for years, so the mulching income becomes minimal.

The season is 8 months, but the demands are high. I cannot make the suggestion to relocate a landscaping or LCO company to ATL. The industry is full and the competition is incredible! The suburbs of ATL (Buckhead, Buford, Roswell, and Marietta) will have some work, but your mortgage will beat you up. The average income in North ATL is $130,000 annually. Average!

I would research the industry in whatever area you are looking to relocate. Can the area support another LCO, etc.?

Dont know where in Atlanta you were in, but my season is 10 months..March-Dec....and as far as landscaping, Pinestraw needs to be replaced twice sometimes three time a year, depending on the size of the landscape area... I charge $6.50 a bale, usually laying down about 20 to 35 bales a home.....I get my pine for $2.25 wholesale, and it only takes a few minutes to drop it down.....It just adds variety.....But I am not sure if you have been here in a while, but Atlanta is a city thats growing fast, and is slowly nearing the levels of cities like NYC, LA, MIA, CHI......Compared to those cities, cost of living in minimal....plus you get a back yard and some trees....lol..I do a lot of mulch jobs also...Just depends on the customers......Competittion is going to be everywhere you go, it up to you to make a name for yourself and make it happen.....I had a pretty good net this year, got my final year end numbers today, and we are going out to have a nice family dinner tonight...

Grass-Masters
01-03-2007, 06:57 PM
You guys from georgia, have you heard anything about Savannah.

ED'S LAWNCARE
01-03-2007, 07:41 PM
Here in South Carolina (Anderson) we are swimming in lco's. Greenvill is about 30 miles south twards Atlanta, much larger area. Sub-divisions are going up all the time, I herd there's 5 builders committed to a total of 8000 homes next year???? My season is approx 32-34 wks per year 1/4 acre runs about 35-40 a cut.

cajuncutters
01-03-2007, 08:03 PM
New Orleans The Hottest City For Lawn Care

matt spinniken
01-03-2007, 08:14 PM
im considering moving out of michigan too. Not because of the weather or the saturation but because i dont think the area i live will support the growth that i really want. What do you guys think is the best type of market for long care? Surrounding areas of big cities like atlanta, DC, chicago, or smaller towns? midsize towns?

Duekster
01-03-2007, 08:23 PM
I may be looking for an experienced super. In Texas which includes a little Spanish and hot long days. I don't work day labor but training might be needed so Latin American spanish would be helpful.

Grass-Masters
01-04-2007, 12:31 AM
New Orleans The Hottest City For Lawn Care

Great I am on my way! :laugh:

KCLandscape
01-04-2007, 01:22 AM
LONG CARE???????
If you can not find work down there....
WHAT are you going to do????

Are the cotton fields still hiring?

GET WITH THE PROGRAM...
Get it done or quit complaining about your situation. Move to Maui.
Go somewhere.

bladerunners
01-04-2007, 02:19 AM
if I were going to move I would get a list of lawn care businesses for sale in several target areas. Try calling some LCOs in an area you target and give them a phoney description of your property and see if they will give you a ball park price. Keep in mind caller Id will show you out of town so get a story that says your moving there soon. Starting from 0 customers is tough enough in your own neighborhood. I would try and buy a small business or some accounts so you can make something while you build clients through time. I would call on repair shops to see if they know something about businesses for sale and how the market is. The problem you'll find is people who lie or will not give an outsider the whole truth. Its a big step that I plan to make when I retire from my full time job but I will have an income to back up my start up. Richard Martin did just that this year maybe he will chime in. Don't expect too many here to invite another competetor into their market by giving away too much info. Good luck!

may I ask you whats LCOs mean ? Please tell me the full name. thanks

upsondown
01-04-2007, 05:28 AM
We're in northern central virginia and the prices go anywhere from $25-$35 for a quarter acre mow and blow - with considerable windshield time between accounts it simply is not profitable.

jeffex
01-04-2007, 07:23 AM
LCO as I understand it is lawn care operation

bladerunners
01-04-2007, 12:00 PM
LCO as I understand it is lawn care operation

ok got it thanks

Team-Green L&L
01-04-2007, 12:06 PM
You guys from georgia, have you heard anything about Savannah.

Savannah is an old city with money. I have not lived there, but I'd be willing to bet there is work there. The city is VERY small though.

Team-Green L&L
01-04-2007, 12:14 PM
I do like the sound of atlanta, but arizona is another great option I am looking at. How long is the normal season in georgia. I will have to check the cost of living in these areas to see which would be more reasonable as well.

Let me back up a second, I sounded like I did not like ATL. I love ATL! I couldn't take the pace. The growth in Roswell (where I'm from) was too much for my family to take. Roswell and Marietta were cozy little towns and Old Hickory Hwy. was a small rural street. Now it is the exact opposite.

While I was down there I got into an accident because of the awkward driving practices there and I was arrested! I couldn't believe you would be arrested for an accident. I was on Tara Blvd. at the first U-turn turning out of an apartment complex and some idiot making U-turn clobbered me. All kinds of strange things happened from then on and a week later I was arrested for vehicular assault. It cost me over $1000 to be found "not guilty" and I left the city shortly after.

Maybe it's just Clayton Co. because North ATL was beautiful and the people were nice.

I don't see why pine would need replaced 2-3 X annually though. My family used the same straw for 5 years before replacement.

Honestly, I just miss my hometown and am a little envious of you guys!

JJLandscapes
01-04-2007, 06:05 PM
arizona just took the crown from nevada for fastest growing area ... nevada had it for 16 years straight but dont know how the landscaping industry is there with the hot temperatures..

Az Gardener
01-04-2007, 06:32 PM
Yes it is growing and there is lots of work and it is year around for the most part. I only offer caution because it is much different here than most parts of the country.

Small yards, very few contractors use mowers bigger than 21" and there is as much or more trimming to be done as there is grass to mow and everyone bags everything here. To be competitive you need to know plants, grass, irrigation and lighting. You must also be able to program irrigation controllers and know what to program. Its not rocket science but it does take a few years to become familiar with the seasons and water needs. Yes you can get by knowing less but then you are competing with the illegals for chump change. Oh and don't forget the consecutive 100 degree days and waking up at 4:00 am to start work and its still 89

Wild West moved here from Fla. and has had a very difficult time getting work at acceptable rates. He has a typical mowing rig that most on site here have. The big Z, walk behind, 21" rotary, blower and weed eater. Just not many accounts that make the best use of his equipment.

However a good foreman supervisor can make 40-K and much more while they learn the ropes. There is a high demand for employees but without contacts or expertise its not as easy as it would seem to get started on your own.

lawnprosteveo
01-04-2007, 07:38 PM
My average for that type of lawn is between $30 to $35.

Grass-Masters
01-05-2007, 02:07 PM
Thanks for all the replies, me and my wife have been talking more and more since I posted this and we are definately moving somewhere. I run another type of business that concentrates on the real-estate rental market so I can make money in any major city pretty fast while I am waiting 2 years for enough accouts to live on. And I have found someone to keep up with my accounts in michigan, he would be a partner for 2 years then assume the company after that. So please keep the comments and info coming. Does anyone have any info on areas in florida that may be good.

Duekster
01-05-2007, 06:30 PM
Get here early and build up your tolerance for the heat! That is if you come to Texas.

Hard Worker
01-05-2007, 08:28 PM
Thanks for all the replies, me and my wife have been talking more and more since I posted this and we are definately moving somewhere. I run another type of business that concentrates on the real-estate rental market so I can make money in any major city pretty fast while I am waiting 2 years for enough accouts to live on. And I have found someone to keep up with my accounts in michigan, he would be a partner for 2 years then assume the company after that. So please keep the comments and info coming. Does anyone have any info on areas in florida that may be good.


Not trying to get into your business but may I ask what exactly your other business is? Reason I ask, I also run two businesses the other compliments our mowing business. Thanks

Here in East Tennesse I also get around 30 to 35 per 1/4 acre lot.

Duekster
01-05-2007, 08:30 PM
Not trying to get into your business but may I ask what exactly your other business is? Reason I ask, I also run two businesses the other compliments our mowing business. Thanks

Here in East Tennesse I also get around 30 to 35 per 1/4 acre lot.


I agree, You have to look at ways to extend your season. It can be pruning, or Christmas lights. Why aerate in the summer if you can do it in the fall, late winter. Winter is a great time to do detail work, Irrigation check ups, etc.... :waving:

Az Gardener
01-06-2007, 12:42 AM
Why aerate in the summer if you can do it in the fall, late winter. :

Duekster, your killing me. :nono:

You aerate in the summer because that is when the turf is actively growing and can repair itself from the horrendous abuse that is aeration.

The point of aerating is not just to generate revenue. It is to help reduce compaction in the soil, improve water penetration to get air down into the root zone to facilitate microbial activity.

I don't care if thats how everyone does it and the grass lives. Any turf class will instruct you that aeration, verticutting and dethatching should be done when the grass is actively growing so it can quickly repair itself.

If you need to generate income in the winter/fall, trim trees, do lighting tune ups, deliver firewood. Anything but terrorizing your clients poor turf.

Grass-Masters
01-06-2007, 06:32 PM
Not trying to get into your business but may I ask what exactly your other business is? Reason I ask, I also run two businesses the other compliments our mowing business. Thanks

Here in East Tennesse I also get around 30 to 35 per 1/4 acre lot.

I run a small publishing company. We publish information on houses to rent. http://www.chicagorentalnetwork.com

I would just open a new office for what ever area I moved to. This would pay my bills for the first couple years.

mark lagasse
01-06-2007, 07:33 PM
I am on the south side of Atlanta and my yards are 10-15sq ft. I don't do fert but my service agreements run from about 200-300+ per month I have one at 1100, that is full service and maintaining shrubs based on 42 visits per year. I am solo and prefer high end houses 500k and up. 06 was my first full year and I did just a little over 20k part time. I would like to increase by 20% this year which is only a couple of good yards.

Grass-Masters
01-06-2007, 07:43 PM
I am on the south side of Atlanta and my yards are 10-15sq ft. I don't do fert but my service agreements run from about 200-300+ per month I have one at 1100, that is full service and maintaining shrubs based on 42 visits per year. I am solo and prefer high end houses 500k and up. 06 was my first full year and I did just a little over 20k part time. I would like to increase by 20% this year which is only a couple of good yards.


If you don't mind me asking. How are you getting 50-75 per week on 1/4 acre lots. That is a great rate but I am curious what you are doing for that. Thanks in advance.

mark lagasse
01-06-2007, 08:01 PM
When I price my service agreement it include shrub maintenance, mow, blow,weeding ,edge, remove yard debris(sticks, pine cones,etc.). A basic mow blow and go is 50. I realize I am new at this but I have been very blessed to have met some agents that sell high end houses and they give my cards to buyers to give me a call when they close. I have a good working relationship with them.

Grass-Masters
01-06-2007, 08:11 PM
Sounds like a great deal, best of luck to ya.

mark lagasse
01-06-2007, 08:28 PM
Best of luck on your decision

TLM
01-08-2007, 12:13 AM
I'm in north metro of Atlanta, and EVERYONE pulls a trailer and cuts grass here. The diff. is service, what can you do that no one is doing.
in 007 we WILL NOT cut small homes or customers that are CHEEP!!!!
Our min. maintenance package for cutting 4x a month starts at $400.00 per month.
Most new homes in this area start at $800,000.00 and they want good service and are willing to PAY for it!!!

I service less homes now, but make more money that I did 2 yrs ago with 80 homes.
I say let the newbies in the biz take care of the cheep people!
That's my 2 cents....

TLM
01-08-2007, 12:28 AM
Also, check the monthly service price out on this company....

http://popslandscaping.com/pops_services_lmma.html

Mean Green Lawns
01-08-2007, 10:39 AM
Hello,

Well, from what I can read a lot of responses on the area in MI and the outlook here is not very accurate. I live in Pontiac and do all my work in Oakland County from Aurburn Hills to Franklin to White LK and over to Rochester Hills. There is over 5 million people in Metro Detroit. Though the market is full of hackers and half assers as I call them, you can still get a TON of work in this area. There are a few HUGE companies around here but if you talk to people, no one seems to like the residential service or cost for the quailty when they can get someone guy with his truck to do it for 20 bucks. (which will get you a 100 custos no problem) I have people calling me all the time who can't get anyone to drive out to Sterling Heights or St Clair Shores. The whole "east side" is basically untapped areas which is a growing part of MI besides GR.

I was thinkig of moving south myself untill I did the research and figured out what I was doing wrong. ALSO YOU HAVE TO know that Detroiters are a different breed than any place else. TIGHT ASS SNOBBY RICH FOLK that expect the best for less and 7 times out of 10 are not even american... lol I'll cut a lawn in BFHills and have to track down a 100 $ payment but the family in Pontiac off Baldwin pays cash up front for the whole season and never complains. Its crazy...

You can make a lot of money here but from what I have learned you have to give these people something different and do it the way they want you to no matter what. I bag for 5$ extra a week and everytyhing else is included. Average price is @ 22 bucks for Rochester, Waterford, LK Orion... One of my buddies sold last year ( jim Lewis lawn and snow) and got out of debt so he could start over doing things right. He had 100+ lawns and twice that in snow... (oakhurst and most of the commercial properties along n. part of opdyke) He managed his business like most of these jokers around here and had two guys that I fired doing all his work. lol

My point is this... If you want to make money year round then work the numbers out and come up with a program that pays you what you need. Take a check like a normal employee and bank the rest. Hire an accounting service if you need to they're cheap.
I spent about 120 hours on my 07 plan already just going over the market outlook for lawn care only. You can recruit custos all day with a 2$ drop in price and keep them with good customer service for years.

PLUS we need all the small business owners around here that we can get to keep people working and money rotating.


You know!

Grass-Masters
01-08-2007, 12:52 PM
Hello,

Well, from what I can read a lot of responses on the area in MI and the outlook here is not very accurate. I live in Pontiac and do all my work in Oakland County from Aurburn Hills to Franklin to White LK and over to Rochester Hills. There is over 5 million people in Metro Detroit. Though the market is full of hackers and half assers as I call them, you can still get a TON of work in this area. There are a few HUGE companies around here but if you talk to people, no one seems to like the residential service or cost for the quailty when they can get someone guy with his truck to do it for 20 bucks. (which will get you a 100 custos no problem) I have people calling me all the time who can't get anyone to drive out to Sterling Heights or St Clair Shores. The whole "east side" is basically untapped areas which is a growing part of MI besides GR.

I was thinkig of moving south myself untill I did the research and figured out what I was doing wrong. ALSO YOU HAVE TO know that Detroiters are a different breed than any place else. TIGHT ASS SNOBBY RICH FOLK that expect the best for less and 7 times out of 10 are not even american... lol I'll cut a lawn in BFHills and have to track down a 100 $ payment but the family in Pontiac off Baldwin pays cash up front for the whole season and never complains. Its crazy...

You can make a lot of money here but from what I have learned you have to give these people something different and do it the way they want you to no matter what. I bag for 5$ extra a week and everytyhing else is included. Average price is @ 22 bucks for Rochester, Waterford, LK Orion... One of my buddies sold last year ( jim Lewis lawn and snow) and got out of debt so he could start over doing things right. He had 100+ lawns and twice that in snow... (oakhurst and most of the commercial properties along n. part of opdyke) He managed his business like most of these jokers around here and had two guys that I fired doing all his work. lol

My point is this... If you want to make money year round then work the numbers out and come up with a program that pays you what you need. Take a check like a normal employee and bank the rest. Hire an accounting service if you need to they're cheap.
I spent about 120 hours on my 07 plan already just going over the market outlook for lawn care only. You can recruit custos all day with a 2$ drop in price and keep them with good customer service for years.

PLUS we need all the small business owners around here that we can get to keep people working and money rotating.


You know!



Thanks for your input, I know there is some money in lawn care. The prices on landscaping keep getting lower and lower. I have 100 accounts now, and know I can add to that. But michigan is going down hill and fast. People will pay 20-25 for a cut but is it really worth it in alot of these properties. Not to mention in the southern states the season is alot longer. I am interested in a change for the better, I am doing good now but it is time for a new growing area. There is work in some areas but not like areas that are growing leaps and bounds. Again thank you for your input but I am looking not only to make some good money but a change in life.

cmras24
01-08-2007, 01:04 PM
Virginia Beach, Virginia approx. 9000 square foot lot 45.00 cut edge, trim and blow.

brucec32
01-10-2007, 03:49 PM
It'd be a lot more useful if you'd detail the man hours involved for some of these prices.

naturescape
02-10-2007, 09:14 AM
I'm considering a move south from the metro Detroit area as well. I'm thinking South Carolina at the moment. I probably won't do this for a few years, my parents are getting older and need me around right now. But I would like a longer working season, although with SOME time off. I'm thinking South Carolina would give me about a 10 month season, as opposed to the 8 month season here. I can also do without snow, never need to see it again! And it would be nice to be within a half hour of the ocean..... :)

supercuts
02-10-2007, 10:35 AM
in in CT, i have a $35 min, but most lawns are 10k-15k areas. my prices average 45-50, and everyone around here is running 61" ztr's. i feel im lucky because even though everyone and their mother has a mower and is a landscaper, i still have more work than i can handle spring/summer/fall. factor in plowing and im grossing a really good amount. this past year i bought a 3rd bobcat ztr, kubota loader/backhoe used, used f550 12' rack dump, tons of smaller power tools, etc, and we still had a good savings. we even paid down or off most purchases.