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lawnman_scott
01-08-2007, 10:03 PM
Alot of people on here say if the owner (you) cant take off for an extended period of time, then you only have basically bought yourself a job and dont own a business. Do you agree with this?

Tim Wright
01-08-2007, 10:42 PM
Yup, True in any business or indeavor.

Been there done that.

Tim

LB1234
01-08-2007, 11:09 PM
whats the point of owning your own business if you can't enjoy its benefits.

J&R Landscaping
01-08-2007, 11:20 PM
I think it depends on the size of the business. A solo operator may run his own business and get some benefits but they will be different benefits from what the owner of a larger business may recieve.

lawnpro724
01-08-2007, 11:26 PM
Do you really think Bill Gates, took weekends off when he started out? I doubt it. More than likely he worked very long hours and never had the time or the money to take a week of let alone more. He like everyone on here had an idea of what he wanted to accomplish and he worked everyday to get there. It takes time and lots of it to get a business up and running before you can start to let it go on its own, having employee's run it while you take time off. In the beginning it may seem like a job because you do most if not all the work yourself and put all your money into the business. In time if you stick with it and make the correct decisions it will turn into what you make it.

Mean Green Lawns
01-09-2007, 12:42 AM
LISTEN... From what I can tell this is the LAST place you should be asking that question.. Ask your wife or family what they think. Being a business owner leaves you that right to decide what you do and when. Take the time off if you need it but cover your azz you know. NEVER NEGLECT YOUR FAMILY, GOD, OR YOURSELF FOR SOMETHING TODAY THAT CAN BE TAKEN AWAY FROM YOU TOMARROW...

HOOLIE
01-09-2007, 01:42 AM
Do you really think Bill Gates, took weekends off when he started out? I doubt it. More than likely he worked very long hours and never had the time or the money to take a week of let alone more. He like everyone on here had an idea of what he wanted to accomplish and he worked everyday to get there. It takes time and lots of it to get a business up and running before you can start to let it go on its own, having employee's run it while you take time off. In the beginning it may seem like a job because you do most if not all the work yourself and put all your money into the business. In time if you stick with it and make the correct decisions it will turn into what you make it.

Good post, exactly what I was thinking.

In many ways, isn't having weekends off and 2 weeks vacation very similar to having a 'job'?? :laugh:

tjsquickcuts
01-09-2007, 01:42 AM
I think a lot of guys look at running a LCO as a Job, and not a company.....I have said before, and I will say again, you have to plan, and plan ahead and then you wont have to worry about if you can take vacation or not.....I do agree that if you are just starting out, you need to work weekends, long hours, and 7 day work weeks to develop a really good and healthy work ethic so that when you start to expand and hire people, they will have a bar to reach that you have set. Plus the more time work, the more experience.....For any vet that isnt taking time off, or is still working like he just started, then you need to re-evaluate what you are doing and come up with a new plan of action. I am loving spoiling myself now....about to buy a new boat for some good fishing this summer, and we are have a house built on 2.5 acres......and I cant wait.....I need to space, and I am going to be in a great location in conjunction with where my lawns are.....and I will be taking two vacations this year, one during spring break, and the other for my wedding anniversary, plus the down time during the short off season...

Mean Green Lawns
01-09-2007, 01:55 AM
I like the way you think Tj

Az Gardener
01-09-2007, 09:26 AM
Businesses evolve over time. In the beginning it is unlikely that an owner could expect the business to operate on its own without the day to day production or oversight of the owner. If after say 5 years you can't take off for a month or longer and have the business operate without you, you own a job no matter how many employees you have.

At the point when your operation can function profitably and continue to grow without you it has evolved into a business. whether it takes 3-5-or 7 years however long that takes that is the point when you own a business.

If you are a solo and you think you own a company you are delusional. You own a job. Thats not saying you are a second rate operator or anything its just semantics. You would'nt call a bear a cow, because they are not the same. Both are big and dark in color but different animals altogether.

Duekster
01-09-2007, 09:29 AM
I also have a business partner. Sure it cuts into profits but there are two of us working to grow them as well.

We can leave while the other covers pretty easy with lots of confidence.

gardenkeeper88
01-09-2007, 09:55 AM
I don't usually work on most saturdays and never have on sundays with my own biz. started out 1th 2 years just about every Sat. now I can make it without. No I do't make as much as some of those that work weekends but I can now state what hours do I need to work to make it and give us xtra for some enjoyment. 1 LCO i know has worked 7 days a week most summertime an has been doing it for 18 yrs. now. He thinks I should work more weekends & I think he works too many. It's what you want out of life.

dtrap420
01-09-2007, 09:52 PM
I am small company compared to some on here and I laugh every time I hear someone say that a solo or small operation is not a buisness because they cant take extended amounts of time off. That is one of the most ignorant statments I have ever heard. Do you even know the defination of the word business? Let me help you out:
Business
Noun
Singular
1. a specific commercial enterprise or establishment.
2. a person's occupation, work, or trade
Even a solo operation fits into this defination. He is providing a service that his customers are willing to pay for. He in turn makes a profit. That is the very foundation of any business in America and around the world. I am smaller as I stated and still venture to say that I make almost as much as some of the bigger guys on here. Even though I only own a job as some say I also can come and go as I please with no questions asked. I dont know of to many jobs around that you can do as you please with no one to answer to but yourself. Just my 2 cent on the subject.

Tim Wright
01-10-2007, 12:18 AM
I am small company compared to some on here and I laugh every time I hear someone say that a solo or small operation is not a buisness because they cant take extended amounts of time off. That is one of the most ignorant statments I have ever heard. Do you even know the defination of the word business? Let me help you out:
Business
Noun
Singular
1. a specific commercial enterprise or establishment.
2. a person's occupation, work, or trade
Even a solo operation fits into this defination. He is providing a service that his customers are willing to pay for. He in turn makes a profit. That is the very foundation of any business in America and around the world. I am smaller as I stated and still venture to say that I make almost as much as some of the bigger guys on here. Even though I only own a job as some say I also can come and go as I please with no questions asked. I dont know of to many jobs around that you can do as you please with no one to answer to but yourself. Just my 2 cent on the subject.


Of course you are right. I think that the term business is being redefined or expanded by those who are trying to get people to think about building wealth rather than just doing their own thing or just surviving.

It follows the same idea as the umpteen buzz words that circulate, change and are invented over the years.

I do personally like the expanded version in that it really gets you (ei anyone thinking) to think about a business MODEL that will make money even though the owner is no longer putting in the sweat equity. It also serves the fact that the business model affords the owner to make money and make choices otherwise not possible if a "Business System" is not in place to that the work continues to get done while not working, whether time off is short term or long term, the business still functions, makes money and can even grow.

That was kind of redundant but oh well.

I don't think that the expanded version is demeaning, or considers sole prop as not valuable or viable. That is for the individual to decide, and as a country we should hold even the smallest business person or business valuable because they are a piece that makes up the whole.

Hopefully I am not boring anyone to tears here.

Tim

Sorry if I bore you.

Tim

ALarsh
01-10-2007, 01:03 AM
If you ever watched any videos on Microsoft and Bill Gates you would know he put his time in... I remember them saying that Bill and his team of programmers would stay in the office for days on end, never leaving living off of pizza and pepsi. They would work through the whole night more often than not when they were starting out and sleep when they could.... they sure put their time in and now reap the rewards. You don't think Bill Gates worked 7 days a week? HA!

jsf343
01-10-2007, 01:22 AM
LISTEN... From what I can tell this is the LAST place you should be asking that question.. Ask your wife or family what they think. Being a business owner leaves you that right to decide what you do and when. Take the time off if you need it but cover your azz you know. NEVER NEGLECT YOUR FAMILY, GOD, OR YOURSELF FOR SOMETHING TODAY THAT CAN BE TAKEN AWAY FROM YOU TOMARROW...

This is a great response Mean G. Life isn't practice, there are no do overs.
you have to figure out what your priorities are (which in my opinion Mean G listed) and take care of them. It is a sad thing to get towards the end of lifes road and have a ton of regrets. Plan for time off, if you are the boss then you can do it. Plan for 5 years down the road, plan for 15 years down the road. I havn't always been the best but am always trying to get better at it. Sorry for the rant, but if you are the boss then nobody can make things work except you! plan man!!

Mr. Vern
01-10-2007, 01:28 AM
I think at the crux of this discussion is the concepts taught in "Rich Dad, Poor Dad". It's a great book and a must read in my opinion.

What the author is trying to point out is that there are 2 types of income. Active and passive. He draws a diagram with 4 quadrants, on the left are the employee, and self employed. On the right are investor and business owner. The left quadrants are forms of income that are directly tied to your daily input or work, and the right quadrants are the forms that produce income regardless of what you are doing.
His point in all of that is to say that we all have to start in the left quadrant as either an employee or a self employed person, but that our goal should be to migrate to one or both of the right quadrants. His supposition is that you can start a business and work in it, but if you have to continue to work in it in order for it to make you money, then you have just created a job for yourself - you still have a job, it's just that you work for yourself.

There are many ways to get to the right quadrants, you could grow your business and have others run it, or you can invest your earnings into endeavors that will produce passive income in the future.

The intended and mature response to reading and internalizing this is not to say that your business is somehow more legitimate than someone elses, it is simply to ask yourself "are my current actions and decisions driving me toward a larger percentage of my income being passive". You don't have to do it through your business. It is entirely acceptable to work in your business while you build your passive income in some other area. Think about a retired person; they are living entirely on passive income. Why not start thinking about that today and enjoy it in your youth.

So I said all of that to say this; just because you have to participate in the daily operation of your business does not in any way decrease it's legitimacy.

Az Gardener
01-10-2007, 02:28 AM
Did everyone miss my bear cow analogy? See the end of page 1 it was brilliant :drinkup:

But seriously it is only semantics, just look at the titles.

Sole proprietor: You are the company, without you it has no value. Yes you can sell the route but it is not a business it is an asset.

Corporation: It has its own identity it goes on with or without you. You can own it but you and it are separate in the eyes of the law.

I don't see why there is so much resistant about this. Do some feel inadequate?

"You don't think Bill Gates worked 7 days a week? HA!"

Key word in that phrase is worked, past tense. All companies need an incredible amount of work to turn them into businesses. If Bill Gates dropped dead tomorrow nothing would change at Microsoft. I can assure you any days he works now are because it is what he wants to do.

How many days or hours you work have absolutely zero to do with whether you own a business or own a job anyway.

If you are a solo operator or even running your crew and you die your business ceases to exist period. Someone may buy the equipment and the route but they are not running your business because it died with you. They are running their business with your old equipment and clients.

If you don't think you own a job as a solo don't go to work for 4 weeks in July and see what you have left to sell. I promise whatever it is its not a business.

Mean Green Lawns
01-10-2007, 06:06 AM
How did taking time off end up in a debate about semantics and the habbits of a man no one here knows or could ever fathum being in a position such as his.

newbomb
01-10-2007, 04:23 PM
If you are a small LCO you basically have a job, BUT it is something you created from nothing and for the most part you have complete control. I would assume that many LCO's started because on some level they enjoy mowing or landscaping. Doing something you like, especially that's your business, is it's own reward. Remember, " a bad day mowing is better than a good day working". .....or is that fishing???? Any way if your mowing only for the money you will burn out and quit like any thing else. For me, a good day of mowing beats any job I ever had.

newbomb
01-10-2007, 04:29 PM
Did everyone miss my bear cow analogy? See the end of page 1 it was brilliant :drinkup:

But seriously it is only semantics, just look at the titles.

Sole proprietor: You are the company, without you it has no value. Yes you can sell the route but it is not a business it is an asset.

Corporation: It has its own identity it goes on with or without you. You can own it but you and it are separate in the eyes of the law.

I don't see why there is so much resistant about this. Do some feel inadequate?

"You don't think Bill Gates worked 7 days a week? HA!"

Key word in that phrase is worked, past tense. All companies need an incredible amount of work to turn them into businesses. If Bill Gates dropped dead tomorrow nothing would change at Microsoft. I can assure you any days he works now are because it is what he wants to do.

How many days or hours you work have absolutely zero to do with whether you own a business or own a job anyway.

If you are a solo operator or even running your crew and you die your business ceases to exist period. Someone may buy the equipment and the route but they are not running your business because it died with you. They are running their business with your old equipment and clients.

If you don't think you own a job as a solo don't go to work for 4 weeks in July and see what you have left to sell. I promise whatever it is its not a business.

This is a fine post but I'm not sure the bear/cow analogy qualifies as brilliant.:hammerhead:

Total.Lawn.Care
01-10-2007, 05:08 PM
I am currently mowing Part-Time with the hopes (and Many Prayers) that I can make the right decisions and do the right advertising to ge the business to go full time with it this spring/summer. That said, I know that at first I will be creating my self my own job. There will be a critical time when nothing in the business will happen without me there to do it.

However, I never started this venture with the expectation of stopping there, and I still am not sure where I am going to go with it. But I do know that once I have a couple of mowing crews working for me so that I can make that passive income without being here everyday, I am going to expand my operation to other relatively close cities. Once I can get established into at least one to two other close cities, I plan on broadning the scope of my services. Do I go into Lanscapes/Hardscapes, Lighting, both. Start up a Fert & Squit division. Form a Tree services branch, I do not know yet, but all of these things are on my mind now, so I know I am not going to stop at a One man show with a helper or two. I started this to be an Enterprise that eventually I will hire people to run my operations while I manage and orchestrate everything in an oversight mode to protect the investment that I built.

Will this take endless hours of work? Yes it will. But the payoff is going to be that I can be my own boss in everysense of the word (aside from customer satisfaction issues) and set my own time clock. I also will have something to pass down to my children, should at least one of the three become interested in the business. Either wa, that is my plan and those are my goals. Are they precise, no. But they are the things that are going on paper so that I can figure out how to get there...

Turfcutters Plus
01-10-2007, 08:03 PM
If you are a small LCO you basically have a job, BUT it is something you created from nothing and for the most part you have complete control. I would assume that many LCO's started because on some level they enjoy mowing or landscaping. Doing something you like, especially that's your business, is it's own reward. Remember, " a bad day mowing is better than a good day working". .....or is that fishing???? Any way if your mowing only for the money you will burn out and quit like any thing else. For me, a good day of mowing beats any job I ever had.

I'm solo and feel fortunate to do what i love.Mowing.I get burned out occasionally,but after that WONDERFUL long break,i'm always fired up ready to go!Since i started 16 years ago,i have NEVER ONCE wished i wasn't doing this.All my other jobs i had before were bull#%!!I LOVE being an entrepenuer.Call it a job,business,whatever.Who the hell cares!!!:cool2:

Stillwater
01-10-2007, 08:20 PM
The absence of a effective leader in anything will effect the outcome. But what it dosen't do is change what it is. You own and run a business you take a week off for a vacation does your business not still exist? My job is owning a business if I take a week off I still own a business it does not disapear just becouse I am hanging out with Jimmy Buffett on his boat for a week getting trashed.

lawnprosteveo
01-10-2007, 10:15 PM
Call it whatever you like...business or job...all I know is I make almost as much as I do on my "full-time" job and I dont have to answer to some ***hole boss. I set my own hours and do things the way I want to. So, call it whatever....It works for me.

lawnman_scott
01-10-2007, 10:21 PM
To those who think its just a job and are NASCAR fans, please explain this for me. Bobby Hamilton passed away this week. For those who dont know, he was a team owner and driver in the NASCAR truck series. Top driver every year and won the championship in 04 i beleive. Well 3 races into last year he found out he had cancer and his son took over (top team) and finished 14th in the points. And how do you think they will do this year? Anyone remember Alan Kulwicki the 92 WC champion that was killed in a plane crash in 93?

It may not be a fortune 500 company, but its still a business.

Can anyone dispute with any logic what I have said? If not, thanks for falling for this.

LwnmwrMan22
01-10-2007, 11:43 PM
I'm solo and feel fortunate to do what i love.Mowing.I get burned out occasionally,but after that WONDERFUL long break,i'm always fired up ready to go!Since i started 16 years ago,i have NEVER ONCE wished i wasn't doing this.All my other jobs i had before were bull#%!!I LOVE being an entrepenuer.Call it a job,business,whatever.Who the hell cares!!!:cool2:

Same here.... I don't have the profit margin like most do, because I buy all the little trinkets, the "toys", I do have the biggest mowers out there with the "nicest trailers" because this is my life.

I don't want employees, I don't want the hassle anymore.

Yes, I realize that if I die, that's the end of my business, but what do I care?? What does my family care??

Most likely they're going to want to have nothing to do with it anyways.

My boys are too young now, and my wife would never have any idea what to do with it, she's never looked at the books, only knows what we have to pay in taxes every year.

So, until the boys get older, I'll be happy "owning my own job now for 19 years".

I work a full-time yearly job in 6 months (80 hours / week), then the other 6 months I sit around waiting for the snow.

So far I've worked 20 hours since the end of October.

My family knows that I work all summer to be able for us to spend most of the winter together.

Prestige-Lawncare
01-10-2007, 11:58 PM
It's a business ... period. But on the other hand ... what's wrong with buying a job? Think about it.
.

Stillwater
01-11-2007, 03:00 AM
Its none of my business to know if i have a job or a business, job or no job it is still a job wondering if their is a business behind the job.
kno whut I mean Vern.

Stillwater
01-11-2007, 03:06 AM
JOB
a piece of work, esp. a specific task done as part of the routine of one's occupation or for an agreed price.

BUSINESS
1. an occupation, profession, or trade
2. the purchase and sale of goods in an attempt to make a profit
3. a person, partnership, or corporation engaged in commerce or a service
4. profit-seeking enterprise or concern

dlm17
01-11-2007, 08:53 AM
I Think Most Of You Guys Are Missing The Point Of Being In The Service Industry And The Reason We Cant Take All That Time Off As Most Of Had Started On Our Own And Then Possibly Grew The One Constant For Our Customers Was Us, They Knew That We Would Be There And When We Werent They Felt They Were Not Getting What They Were Paying For Because They Hired Us Not The Company Now For Those Of You Who Do Office Buildings And Shopping Centers Its Different Nobody Knows You So They Dont Care Whos Cutting The Grass, My Name Is On The Buisness So I Will Be There And I Will Bs With My Cutomers And I Wont Charge Them For Talking To Them And I Will Be Happy Because I Own A Buisness That Will Allow Me To Do This And Decide How Much I Want To Put In Not What The Boss Thinks I Should

lawnman_scott
01-13-2007, 12:01 AM
Businesses evolve over time. In the beginning it is unlikely that an owner could expect the business to operate on its own without the day to day production or oversight of the owner. If after say 5 years you can't take off for a month or longer and have the business operate without you, you own a job no matter how many employees you have.

At the point when your operation can function profitably and continue to grow without you it has evolved into a business. whether it takes 3-5-or 7 years however long that takes that is the point when you own a business.

If you are a solo and you think you own a company you are delusional. You own a job. Thats not saying you are a second rate operator or anything its just semantics. You would'nt call a bear a cow, because they are not the same. Both are big and dark in color but different animals altogether.Did you miss my Bobby Hamilton analogy, It was 1000 times more brilliant than yours.

JimLewis
01-13-2007, 02:01 AM
Even for the smallest Solo Op. here, this is still a business and still way better than any job.

First, what job allows you to work for say, 40 different people at once?

What job allows you to just fire one of your bosses, and still be left with over 90% of your income?

Not many jobs allow the full amount of business write-offs that this one does.

What job can you just walk not show up - and then play catch-up the following few days?

What job allows you to move up in the company whenever YOU chose to do so?

In what job do YOU decide how much money you make and how much your company keeps?

What job allows you to set your own schedule, decide which jobs to take and which not to take, set your own territory, and make ALL of the big decisions for the company?

I'm telling ya, even at it's least, being an LCO is better than most any job.

Mean Green Lawns
01-13-2007, 02:29 AM
Can we get a AMEN.....

cantoo
01-13-2007, 07:55 PM
I always tell people that they need to have some sort of business on their own or at least on the side from their regular job. If you are working for someone and get $100 per day, you have a really good day get lots done and you make your $100 and your boss makes all the rest. Now if you are the owner and you have a really good day you get all the money.

green horizons
01-13-2007, 11:52 PM
A Sole Proprietorship is a business.

Envy Lawn Service
01-14-2007, 04:09 AM
Many good posts in this thread.

At this hour it can be hard to 'absorb' what you read, but the 3 best that stand out to me are #6, #17 and #33.

Do #6 first.

Consider #17 next.

Then sum it up with #33.

The fact of the matter is that in this profession, unless you have built your lawn business into a source of passive income where you are no longer personally or physically involved.... you are either one of two things...

Building a business or Operating a business

.... and truth is, if you fall into that category, you are engaging in an ACTIVE income endeavor. And like it or not, the very nature of this business and most others requires you to be heavily actively involved to the point where there are consequences for relaxing or being slack in any way.

The high majority of green industry professionals are ACTIVE and the very nature of this business does not allow for a very high level of personal freedom during season.

That's the nature of the game and sacrifice is the price of entry.

At this point I'm personally engaged in a bit more of a relaxed active roll. I don't do the 'daylight-to-dark' 6 to 7 day a week thing all season anymore and remain buried in the back-office stuff all winter.

I choose to remain this way atleast one more season.
After that, we'll see what route I decide to take... and I won't know until the time comes.

Rons Rightway Lawncare
01-14-2007, 06:36 AM
I work solo, and I take.....

The entire week after April off.

The first full week of August off.

The second full week of October off.

Then I have almost all of Jan and Feb off.

That is alot of time OFF from a JOB! I don't know anyone with a standard JOB that has that much time off. Plus I call the shots as the business owner.... I decide when to go to work, when to quit work, and if I want or need a random day off... I take it.

newbomb
01-14-2007, 10:14 AM
Its none of my business to know if i have a job or a business, job or no job it is still a job wondering if their is a business behind the job.
kno whut I mean Vern.

Huh What?

Remember boys (and Katie A C) you can't take none of this junk or the cash with you when you go in the box (dirt nap, lawn limbo etc). What you have to do is provide for your family, enjoy life the best you can and "store up your treasures in heaven". Might as well enjoy it while your here.

PS when you go in the box hope Deereman comes by once in awhile to trim you up.

Howard Roark
01-14-2007, 12:47 PM
Even for the smallest Solo Op. here, this is still a business and still way better than any job.

First, what job allows you to work for say, 40 different people at once?

What job allows you to just fire one of your bosses, and still be left with over 90% of your income?

Not many jobs allow the full amount of business write-offs that this one does.

What job can you just walk not show up - and then play catch-up the following few days?

What job allows you to move up in the company whenever YOU chose to do so?

In what job do YOU decide how much money you make and how much your company keeps?

What job allows you to set your own schedule, decide which jobs to take and which not to take, set your own territory, and make ALL of the big decisions for the company?

I'm telling ya, even at it's least, being an LCO is better than most any job.


AGREED!!!!

LwnmwrMan22
01-14-2007, 01:08 PM
I understand why the guys on here say that if you're a solo op, or have one employee, that you're not a "business".

I hope you "business"-owners realize why / how some of the guys here are happy being solo ops / small operations.

Az Gardener
01-14-2007, 01:30 PM
It's not a matter of if you are happy or not, and yes I would agree owning your job is better than someone else owning your job.

This poll will tell you that it is still a company but consider who you are polling. Poll the CEO's on the fortune 500 companies and you will get a different response. Better yet let the market decide. Put your business/job up for sale and see what value it has.

This is repeated thread after thread when the same people who say it is still a company will also caution you about paying too much for other small "companies" because there is no guarantee that you will retain the clients.

There is even a thread about how even if you have contracts they are not valid if the business is s sold. Because it is not a business! It is a contract for one person to do work for another person.

Just for the record that "brilliant" comment was a joke. You know the two paper cut out guys in the beer commercials? I love those guys. I don't know how Bobby Hamilton applies. All I know is he is a race car driver that died. Someone will have to explain to me how he applies to our discussion.

LwnmwrMan22
01-14-2007, 02:59 PM
It's not a matter of if you are happy or not, and yes I would agree owning your job is better than someone else owning your job.

This poll will tell you that it is still a company but consider who you are polling. Poll the CEO's on the fortune 500 companies and you will get a different response. Better yet let the market decide. Put your business/job up for sale and see what value it has.

This is repeated thread after thread when the same people who say it is still a company will also caution you about paying too much for other small "companies" because there is no guarantee that you will retain the clients.

There is even a thread about how even if you have contracts they are not valid if the business is s sold. Because it is not a business! It is a contract for one person to do work for another person.

Just for the record that "brilliant" comment was a joke. You know the two paper cut out guys in the beer commercials? I love those guys. I don't know how Bobby Hamilton applies. All I know is he is a race car driver that died. Someone will have to explain to me how he applies to our discussion.

About selling your business....

Everything that you're going to sell, is only worth what someone else will pay for it.

With that said, obviously you're not going to get as much for a "business", solo op, or few employees, as you would for a business that has 50 employees and shows decent profit margins.

However, if you find someone else that just wants to "putz along" in life, without the headaches and such from having employees and the other stuff that goes with running a larger outfit, then you may do fairly well.

Some people here make it sound like, if you're just running a small operation, you may as well just park everything behind the house when you don't want to work anymore, that you're not even going to get $100 for it.

There's something said for having a name in a community for an extended period of time. There's name recognition. It's an established business.

If you're running a small operation, you shouldn't be looking for the large payoff at then end, you need to go about it, setting up your retirement now, which SHOULD be done no matter WHAT type of operation you're running.

I know of people that had $1M landscape supply operations, yet they have to have auctions, because no one wants to buy the business.

Just because you have employees and an office, that doesn't guarantee that you're going to find a buyer either.

It's no different that the housing, auto, or any other market when it comes time to sell.

Hopefully the right person comes along. If not, you're out either way.

Lawnworks
01-14-2007, 04:36 PM
I think some people did some fibb'n when they voted!! 65% is a load of crap!