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ScottyK79
01-09-2007, 01:37 PM
We recently acquired some ball fields and rodman construction is working behind them. They busted some main lines and now there is all kinds of trash in the lines. I have flushed the valves, flushed the heads, tried everything. When I turn on the water at the double check, all the zones come on and stay on. Anyone have any ideas of how to fix this, replace the valves maybe?????????? Please help, thank you.

milsaps118
01-09-2007, 01:43 PM
Sounds like to me that there is so much debris in the valves its causing 'em to stick open. You might want to try and flush it longer or manually open/ close each valve. If that don't work I think you'll either have to take apart each valve and clean 'em or just replace 'em.

Good Luck!

Wet_Boots
01-09-2007, 02:06 PM
You might need to assume there will always be some crud in the supply, and install a Y-strainer to catch it. Just before the backflow preventer is the usual location for one.

ScottyK79
01-09-2007, 02:30 PM
Thanks for the info, I think I will install the strainer and replace one valve at a time to see if that does it. Thank you very much guys.

Dirty Water
01-09-2007, 03:12 PM
No need to start replacing valves or installing strainers. If the system worked fine before the mainline break, then theres not much point in putting in a strainer.

Start taking the bonnet off each valve, and removing the diaphragm. I'd replace each diaphragm and flush out the valve body.

Valves stick open from trash jamming against the diaphragm.

jerryrwm
01-09-2007, 04:37 PM
This sounds like a job for T&M Man!! Locate each valve, remove the bonnet and diaphragm, clean out debris. Also check under solenoid actuator. May have trash there also. Check the diaphragm seat for damage. Replace them as necessary. May take several flushings.

Depending on the amount of trash, replacing valves wouldn't aleviate the problem until the main line is clear.

ScottyK79
01-09-2007, 06:22 PM
Thanks for the input, I have flushed them all(8 valves) atleast 15 times. I guess I will try replacing the diaphragms first then move onto another solution. Thanks again

Wet_Boots
01-09-2007, 06:36 PM
There is a point in putting in a mainline strainer, if there is a possibility that the line cannot be completely flushed clear. I recall an old lake-fed system that had imperfect supply filtration, and even after that was corrected, there was always some crud being washed out of the lines and into the mist heads every time the system was opened in the spring. That went on for years.

YardPro
01-09-2007, 07:41 PM
just flushing the valves will porbably NOT solve the problem.

you will have to take off the top of the valve and inspect under the diaphram. this is where the trash will be.

you may not have to replace the diaphram at all.. just remove the trash manually and you might very well be golden.

Duekster
01-09-2007, 07:48 PM
Just got in the house from fixing something like that. We have had several breaks at a job site in the last 3 weeks. Now valves are sticking open.

I don't know how many zones it is but it has 2 maxicoms. I think each is a 36 zone and both are nearly full.

Man alive can this wait until next week.

Mjtrole
01-10-2007, 12:54 AM
maybe the mainline is looped and that junk keeps circulating until it gets caught up in a valve, if not find the last valve(s) and take it/them off turn on the water and take a nice long lunch and that should flush them out.

PurpHaze
01-10-2007, 08:27 AM
Thanks for the input, I have flushed them all(8 valves) atleast 15 times. I guess I will try replacing the diaphragms first then move onto another solution. Thanks again

We encounter this problem from time to time (some slight and some real bad) due to contractors breaking main lines.

First... What type of debris are you encountering? Could be anything from dirt, bark, twigs, PVC debris to rocks. If the debris is large enough then the entire system will require thorough and complete flushings. We had one where rocks had been introduced into the main line and this took a long time to clear out. Some of the rocks beat up the interior of the valve bodies so bad that the entire valve had to be replaced. Some valves required their diaphrams to be replaced. Others were fine. We tend to find that the farthest downstream valves are always the worst. Some so bad that debris that made it past the valve actually clogs and collapses the sprinkler filters.

Second... HOW are you flushing the valves out? If you're just removing the bonnets then you run the real risk of siphoning debris back into the main line from the valve box area. We usually take a corresponding piece of PVC pipe that will fit snugly into the valve body (bonnet removed) and then use a 90 and another short piece of PVC to construct a blow-out and throw the debris away from the valve. Ohat way you'll be sure that the debris is not going back into the main line. One person will have to hold the blow-out in place while another opens the main valve.

If the debris has made it past the valves then you'll have to be alert as to sprinklers clogging also. Fix the valves first and then the sprinklers. You may get everything up and running again but you'll need to keep an eye on things and I'll bet that you'll have to flush some of the components out again at a later time.

ScottyK79
01-10-2007, 04:49 PM
This is what I am dealing with! I took some 11'4 and flushed them out so no debris could get back in on each valve. There are so many rocks that it is just clogging everything in no time. I actually got it to calm down today and it is working for now, we'll see tomorrow morning I guess.

Dirty Water
01-10-2007, 06:36 PM
Yeah, thats what I expected. This is why I start to cry when I get out to a service call and the contractor goes:

"We broke it, so I had Joe Laborer fix it, and now the zones won't shut off".

T&M!

I'm digging the fitting to fitting male adapters...:dizzy:

PurpHaze
01-10-2007, 09:14 PM
This is what I am dealing with! I took some 11'4 and flushed them out so no debris could get back in on each valve. There are so many rocks that it is just clogging everything in no time. I actually got it to calm down today and it is working for now, we'll see tomorrow morning I guess.

Yeah... That's what the worst one we've ever come across looked like too. It was when a contractor was hired to reroute a four inch main line and chose to use the "hammer it with a sledge" method to go under a 10' sidewalk. We had problems steadily for over a month and then occasional problems over the following year. Finally things straightened out after that.

You're also probably going to be subjected to problems in the future that will be atrributed to this situation. Keep these pictures safe and make sure the owner knows this has the potential for being an ongoing problem and not the result of "shoddy" repair work on your end.

PurpHaze
01-10-2007, 09:17 PM
"We broke it, so I had Joe Laborer fix it, and now the zones won't shut off".

I thought for sure it would be "no habla" instead. :)

PurpHaze
01-10-2007, 09:18 PM
BTW Scotty... Is that valve in a Christy box?

ScottyK79
01-11-2007, 09:12 AM
Yes it is.

PurpHaze
01-11-2007, 09:09 PM
Thought I recognized the telltale support ring. :)

Dirty Water
01-11-2007, 09:37 PM
Carson 10" round boxes have the same ring, though I believe Christies boxes are black, while Carsons are green (usually).

Ametek's boxes have impossible to remove lids.

PurpHaze
01-12-2007, 08:23 AM
Carson 10" round boxes have the same ring, though I believe Christies boxes are black, while Carsons are green (usually).

Ametek's boxes have impossible to remove lids.

I was referring to concrete Christy boxes. Each style we use (under specific circumstances for special traffic considerations and/or isolation valves that are sleeved) can have a variety of lids but we use only the cast iron lids marked "water". That way they can be found with a metal detector in the event they're lost by being covered with grass or dirt.

We use the round traffic G-5 box for resilient wedge isolation valves, round F-8 box for isolation gate valves and the rectangle B-9 box for valves or as wire make-up boxes. The price of the concrete boxes has remained pretty steady but the cast iron lids have really shot up in price. We'll usually order a couple pallets of the various types of boxes a couple of times a year so that we always have a decent supply on hand.