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ctvalley
01-11-2007, 02:26 AM
Today, I ventured out to a few new properties in search of work this coming spring/summer.

While walking along through the property the manager stopped me and we happened into a great conversation with her as to her needs at this site. (I also, was given info on two other properties from her).

As I am new I have a couple of specific questions to find out.

1. The manager told me that the ground is claylike and drains poorly. They have put in irrigation drains and plan to put a few more in soon. Is there anything else that I could suggest.

2. The manager wants me to provide a fertilizer program. She is looking for the basics...green grass Is there a site for zone 5 as far as a basic fertilizer program that anyone may know of?

3. Mulch is everywhere at this site!! Around every tree...flower bed, stairs..foundations, etc. 3-4'' is the norm. Is there a site anyone knows of to get red cedar mulch delivered and for how much?? I have a few places around that provide it but the price isn't too great.

4. Finally, Edging is to be done. I figure once a month should be sufficient. Does anyone think this is too often/not often enough? Any suggestions are very welcome


Thanks in advance for your advice


I went to three other places, 2 banks and one pharmacy...I was pleasantly surprised to find that these people were welcome to my bid. As a matter of fact one branch manager was happy to see me and told me of the horrors from her last landscaper. She really didn't have to tell me....i could see it for myself...what a mess...looks like some leads for me...i'll keep you posted later on that.

carcrz
01-11-2007, 08:17 AM
1. I have had customers swear by a product called Enviromax. Basically it breaks down the soil so water can drain more easily. Never tried it myself, just have heard about it several times.

2. Go to your local supplier & they should be able to get you a schedule & your product cost. Then go from there.

3. Lucky you! Same deal, go to the supplier. There are several mulch calculators online to figure out how much needed.

4. If there is a lot of grond to cover edging, you may consider using a walk behind edger to get a wider edge & takes less effort.

Duekster
01-11-2007, 09:09 AM
A good place to start is the ag department often run by a state school. They often discuss turf programs for your area.

I also suggest soil samples sent to the same and they will give you very specific fertilizer requirements.

ed2hess
01-11-2007, 07:52 PM
Don't know any upscale commericial that isn't edged weekly, in our area. Go talk to Lesco about product that works the soils and the fertilize program. If a property manager is having landscape problems then they naturally want to fix that problem but more often than not they are looking for a low price.

lawnrich
01-11-2007, 10:58 PM
or just tell your aunt or sister to hire a pro

mattfromNY
01-11-2007, 11:07 PM
I have to be honest, if you are asking for answers to these basic questions, you should probably start out with some residential customers' properties to 'learn' on. Or, you may be the company not keeping these customers needs fulfilled this year.
I'm not trying to bash you, Its great that you are getting an early start, and still have time to learn alot before spring, but make sure you know what you are doing before signing contracts and making promises to these places. Just my 2 cents. From experience. And '06 was my first year full time.

mattfromNY
01-11-2007, 11:12 PM
A good approach may be to concentrate your own efforts on the edging, mulching, etc. and get hooked up with someone (licensed, etc.) to do the fertilization and drainage issues, that you could sub the work to. Do you need to carry a license in MA. for commercial fert. application? Are you licensed?

ctvalley
01-12-2007, 03:01 AM
Thank you for the posts so far....I would not be fixing the drainage just the soil.

The reason that I ask questions is that there are so many professionals on here. I tend to know the answers...or at least most of them. But, there always seems to be a small bit of info that I can learn from each post.

I have 3 1/2 years experience...but i was the one being told to do the work. what to put on and where to mow. But, now i have decided to go on my own. Hopefully, all goes well. Just because I am not 100% sure on every little detail, I plan on bidding high. That way I have some financial leeway for any mishaps that could occur.

I'll keep you posted.

Also, has anyone had good results with gypsum for soils heavy in clay?