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topsites
01-16-2007, 09:44 AM
omg the pics make it look a LOT easier than it is lolololol ...
Cost of kit: $100
Cost of wooden base: $45
Cost of valve tool: ~$10
Time to assemble entire thing: ~2 hours or so
Time to do the below tire change (w/ valve stem): 1 hour LOL!
(You have to go slow cuz if it slips you could hurt yourself, and it gets hairy towards the end)
Other notes: I never got the bead to seat, and will be taking this and the other 3 tires to a mechanic to have it done LOL!
> I will keep this for lawn mower tires, and it might still work for the occasional 1 tire replacement (like a flat that has to be replaced).

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire2.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire3.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire4.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire5.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire6.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire7.jpg

Continued ...

topsites
01-16-2007, 09:49 AM
http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire8.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire9.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire10.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire11.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire12.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire13.jpg

Continued ...

topsites
01-16-2007, 09:49 AM
http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire14.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire15.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire16.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire17.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire18.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire19.jpg

That's it.

carcrz
01-16-2007, 09:53 AM
just so everyone else knows, you can buy the changer a kit cheaper @ Harbor Freight. I paid $40 for one that works on my mower wheels.

topsites
01-16-2007, 09:53 AM
Yeah, I knocked myself about the head for not having waited, but I had no way of knowing Harbor Freight would sell them ...
I bought mine from J-Thomas out of Detroit (shipped).
And I agree, it is good for lawn mower tires.
The pics don't do the work any justice: car tires are a ROYAL PITA!!!
You really are way better off paying the $20-$25 / tire at a shop.
But, this I had to see for myself (very educational hahaha).

Other required supplies:
Air compressor (to refill)
Flat head screwdriver and vise grips (to remove old valve)
Valve stems (also from J-Thomas, bulk ordered about 10 of these).
A new tire

And: For car tires you really need this tire glue crap which...

topsites
01-16-2007, 10:04 AM
btw, you also need a tire balancer...
A nice dynamic one (rather used) is around a thousand dollars.
You can get a manual one that looks almost like a mower blade balancer, but after what I done went through with this manual tire change, there's NO way I'm getting into manually balancing a tire LOL.

The tire(s) I got from tirerack.com

It's a Kumho Touring plus, which is 1 step below a Grand Touring tire, and a GT tire is one step below performance (or the highest grade passenger tire). So the T+ is two steps below performance (still above average).

The last set of GT tires I bought, I paid close to $400 for all of it (mounting and balancing and everything)...
This time, the tires I paid $190 for and had them in 3-4 days shipped.
It'll still cost me close to $300 for all 4 installed, but I can tolerate this.
It was all about saving money concerning tires, I learned quite a bit LOL

Dirt Digger2
01-16-2007, 10:07 AM
that looks like the same thing the real tire changing machines look like except the real ones are powered by air pressure. You can change the tires yourself more easily by using 2 tire irons...another reason you may have had difficulty is that you were not using a bead lubricant. it takes practice but after a few tires you can get pretty good at changing them.

LindblomRJ
01-16-2007, 10:21 AM
omg the pics make it look a LOT easier than it is lolololol ...
Cost of kit: $100
Cost of wooden base: $45
Cost of valve tool: ~$10
Time to assemble entire thing: ~2 hours or so
Time to do the below tire change (w/ valve stem): 1 hour LOL!
(You have to go slow cuz if it slips you could hurt yourself, and it gets hairy towards the end)
Other notes: I never got the bead to seat, and will be taking this and the other 3 tires to a mechanic to have it done LOL!
> I will keep this for lawn mower tires, and it might still work for the occasional 1 tire replacement (like a flat that has to be replaced).



Cost to fix a flat tire on a car $12.00. When was the last time I had to fix a tire on a car? 8 years. Time it takes at the tire shop 15 minutes...

I did tire work for about a year.:dizzy:

The Intimidator
01-16-2007, 10:32 AM
lol my local wallmart mounts car and truck tires up to 35"s I think maybe 33"s and atv tire's ect for 5$ each and they have yet to mess one up I forget how much it was to have them balanced but it was no more then 40$ for the 4 of them. I used to just go to the high school and do the tire's they have a tire machine and a balancer 45 minutes of my time and I have 4 tire's mounted and balanced

MowerMedic77
01-16-2007, 04:37 PM
Damm Tops you just need more practice..LOL the last time it took me that long to change and car tire I was using my friends car to drive up a board and break the bead and then removed the tire with large screwdrivers.

I use that same set up in my shop and do trailer tires all the time. What you need to do is once you have the bead started like in the first pic push it down as far as you can so that the tire is not setting so close to the bead seat this will help with getting the rest of the tire on. I am not sayin this will make it super easier but you should not have to fight it soo much. Hope this helps.:)

Edgewater
01-16-2007, 05:36 PM
I takes A LOT of air to get the bead to set, not just high pressure, but a uge volume at once.

I have seen people use flammables such as propane or ether inside heavy equipment tires and "explode" them onto the rim, not very safe, but fun to watch.

Dirt Digger2
01-16-2007, 05:42 PM
well theres a few diffrent ways to set the bead...one you can put a rachet strap around the ouside tread of the tire and ratchet it snug...as soon as the bead sets take the strap off...another is they make this tire goop that is like silly puddy you put between the bead and rim and its acts as a sealent and as the tire inflates more the goop is pushed out for re-use...but the fastest way but doesn't always work is a propane tank with a ball valve custom welded onto it, on the other side of the ball valve is a cast iron pipe squished down to more of a oval opening as opposed to a large round opening, you put the squished part of the pipe in between the bead and rim and open the ball valve...(put about 115psi into the propane tank) and that delivers the air and volume fast...howver most times you can inflate a tire by standing it upright, taking the valve stem out and using a good compressor (not one of the crappy cigartette lighter compressors) then inflate the tire to around 30psi and put the vavle stem back in...by taking the valve stem out it is allowing more air to go into the tire

mike lane lawn care
01-16-2007, 09:46 PM
my dad's school just spent $5,000 on a device to change their own tires in the fleet astro vans. Does it in about 2 mins.

mag360
01-16-2007, 11:16 PM
I use that same set up in my shop and do trailer tires all the time. What you need to do is once you have the bead started like in the first pic push it down as far as you can so that the tire is not setting so close to the bead seat this will help with getting the rest of the tire on. I am not sayin this will make it super easier but you should not have to fight it soo much. Hope this helps.:)

This advice^ coupled with the ratchet strap trick that dirt digger mentioned will make the job alot easier.

gammon landscaping
01-17-2007, 09:18 PM
this is funny something that dad always made us do, is change the tires on stuff. dad always hated the idea of paying someone to chang a tire. we always just used two tire irons. there is a few tips
1. use soap and lots of it, you don't need anything fancy liquid dish soap is fine
2. there is a groove in the rim that the tire goes in to when installing or uninstalling, you have to get the opisit side of the tire in there
3 take out the valve stem and have a good hose and a big tank to set the bead.

if we have problems setting the bead we always used either, i know safty safty safty, but it works if you put the right amount in it, not to much not to little

DoetschOutdoor
01-18-2007, 01:03 AM
$4 an hour at the Air Force base here to use their tire changing machines and balancers. Just learned how to change tires this weekend when we did the trailer.

topsites
01-18-2007, 01:37 AM
Yeah, I think I'm going to give it another shot...
For one, I put the tire on the wrong RIM arrrrrgggg....

I'll check out some of the tips, dish soap I got tons of (and I mean tons)...

I know it looks like I did it wrong, but that's an aluminum rim and maybe I DID do it wrong but the stupid hook part of the bar would NOT latch onto the rim which is why I used the straight end. I may, however, take the angle grinder and re-work that hook part just a little bit, since I think the problem is that it doesn't curve far enough (and by just a hair).

I tried pushing down, it's at the very end when you got about 1/3'rd of the tire left to hook that it got hairy.
However, I may try a BIG screwdriver or something with a slightly thinner lip.

It's not just the issue of money.
It's also having to drive out there, hope they can do it soon, wait, then drive back.
If time is worth money, that is...

I appreciate the encouragement, the ribbing I can handle.

.........................
For those of you getting mounting / balancing done for less than $20-$25 / tire, that's most likely because you bought the tire there.
But mounting / balancing on customer-provided tires runs $20-$25 each, and while you can find some to do it for $19 but then you gotta find someone halfway close, too...

Cost to fix a flat tire on a car $12.00. When was the last time I had to fix a tire on a car? 8 years. Time it takes at the tire shop 15 minutes...

I did tire work for about a year.:dizzy:

This is a tire replacement, (not due to a flat except perhaps in the case of sidewall puncture...)
While I do fix my own flats, that takes all of 5-10 minutes and doesn't always require even taking the wheel off the car thou certainly does not require removing the whole tire off the rim :)

On that note, make sure you get the kit with the T-handles, and for truck tires I recommend using an electric drill with a smallish bit and pre-drilling the hole SLOWLY before you ream it out with the tool...
While this last tip comes in handy anytime you can't get the stupid reaming tool through the radial lining.

LindblomRJ
01-18-2007, 12:48 PM
The last flat tire that needed repair on a Saturday afternoon. With a patch that was done right, not with the hokey kit that puts a plug in the tire, 15 minutes. Tire patches done right last a lot longer than any plug I have ever seen. Yes that generally requires that you remove the tire from the rim but the end result is more consistent than the "t" handle and plug.

John Gamba
01-18-2007, 12:57 PM
http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire14.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire15.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire16.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire17.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire18.jpg

http://stonypointlawncare.com/images/Tirechange/tire19.jpg

That's it.



Not very rim friendly. You will find on the smaller tires that investing in split rims is the way to go.

Dirt Digger2
01-18-2007, 04:16 PM
Not very rim friendly. You will find on the smaller tires that investing in split rims is the way to go.

till they go bad and pop apart blowing up the tire and taking your head with it...haha

John Gamba
01-18-2007, 04:30 PM
till they go bad and pop apart blowing up the tire and taking your head with it...haha




They have nuts and bolts that hold them together. i'm talking about caster tires haha

ed2hess
01-18-2007, 06:56 PM
Just looking at this procedure makes me so glad that I live close to
Discount Tires. I watched them change one of the little front tires on a WB and it was pure hell with all their concret mounted equipment.

Dirt Digger2
01-19-2007, 08:07 AM
They have nuts and bolts that hold them together. i'm talking about caster tires haha

haha, ok cause around here some farmers want wider tires on their tractors so they cut the rims in half and weld a peice of steel around them to make the rim wider...when the weld rusts or goes bad you can start to run into problems with holding air pressure and rim expolsion

John Gamba
01-19-2007, 08:30 AM
haha, ok cause around here some farmers want wider tires on their tractors so they cut the rims in half and weld a peice of steel around them to make the rim wider...when the weld rusts or goes bad you can start to run into problems with holding air pressure and rim expolsion


I do believe i said it wrong and i know now you thought of the tractor trailer tires. Sorry:waving:

DLCS
01-19-2007, 09:10 AM
They have nuts and bolts that hold them together. i'm talking about caster tires haha


John,

Are you talking about caster tires for ztrs? If so where do you get yours?

John Gamba
01-19-2007, 09:18 AM
John,

Are you talking about caster tires for ztrs? If so where do you get yours?


Walker has them, jungle wheel's has them to. there really for the very small tires that are very hard to do with conventional tool's.

DLCS
01-19-2007, 09:50 AM
Walker has them, jungle wheel's has them to. there really for the very small tires that are very hard to do with conventional tool's.



Ok, I see. I thought you found replacement rims for ztrs that are 2 piece.

AndyTblc
01-19-2007, 10:58 PM
Time for an air powered tire changer.

MowerMedic77
01-20-2007, 12:32 PM
Just a suggestion but I think the last pic of the tire finally on the rim should be Tops new Avatar pic........:laugh:

LindblomRJ
01-20-2007, 04:12 PM
Just a suggestion but I think the last pic of the tire finally on the rim should be Tops new Avatar pic........:laugh:

I agree. :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

J&R Landscaping
01-20-2007, 08:50 PM
IMO, car and truck tires are so much easier to change by hand then the smaller mower tires. I have done about a 1/2 dozen car and truck tires by hand and once you get the hang of it, its not that bad. Same with the mower tires, but mower tires are a tighter fit.