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View Full Version : Adding additional hose bibs to the back of the yard?


Gilla Gorilla
01-16-2007, 09:52 PM
I have a friend that is looking for help or someone to take over on this project for his customer. Here is what the guy is looking for. He wants to additional hose bibs, one at each corner of his backyard each run will be approx. 200' from what I am told. What is the best material to use for this, pvc? We will get Miss Utility in and have the backyard marked for utilities of course. I have a 420 Dingo so I can rent a trencher attachment if needed, which I am imagining that it will be needed.

I am open to all opinions and suggestions on this.

Thanks

Flow Control
01-16-2007, 09:59 PM
I run pvc for those. Not sure on your pressure or soil conditions, use sch40 if you can. Then at the spicket you can run copper up from the ground if you want.

Gilla Gorilla
01-16-2007, 10:15 PM
How deep do you lay the pipe and what size pipe in the ground?

Bigred350
01-16-2007, 10:30 PM
THe depth would depend on if you are going to use it in the winter or not. If you plan on not using it during the winter and have a way of shutting it off the 1 foot should be plenty. If it was me I would go atleast 18".

3/4" or 1" PVC would be plenty for just a hose spigot.

Gilla Gorilla
01-16-2007, 11:00 PM
It will not be used in the winter as far as I know. I found out a little while ago that the hose bib on the house is in the middle of the house in the back. So I was thinking about making a upside down T from the house. Coming out with one line 200' then teeing off to each corner of the property, I am imagining that he would not want to run sprinklers at the same time off the two new bibs in the corners.

Thanks again

PurpHaze
01-17-2007, 08:32 AM
It will not be used in the winter as far as I know. I found out a little while ago that the hose bib on the house is in the middle of the house in the back. So I was thinking about making a upside down T from the house. Coming out with one line 200' then teeing off to each corner of the property, I am imagining that he would not want to run sprinklers at the same time off the two new bibs in the corners.

Thanks again

What type of pipe is on this hose bibb at the back of the house and what size? Depending on how the house was built you most likely have 1/2" or 3/4" pipe to this hose bibb. In some rare occasions I've seen the rear hose bibb off of 1" pipe.

You can tee into this bibb with galvanized or copper depending on what the present material is. I'd hardpipe it until it's under ground as a hedge against instability. Then run SCH 40 PVC pipe (12"-18" deep) to the locations where the new bibbs will be installed. I'd hardpipe the pipe coming out of the ground to the new hose bibbs for stability also.

Your buddy will not be able to run more than one of the back yard hose bibbs at a time unless he's using very little water because they all come off the same source at the same place.

lehrjetmx
01-17-2007, 09:36 AM
Instead of using an above ground hose bid you can get a Carson box and bury it in the ground and it has a lid with a opening that you can use either a quick disconnect hose or a regular hose connection.

Dreams To Designs
01-17-2007, 09:41 AM
You may want to think about using frost proof yard hydrants and keeping your connection and piping below the freeze line. Hooking into an existing hose bib will severely limit the volume and flow to any additional outlets.

Kirk

PSUturf
01-17-2007, 11:29 AM
If you put one of the Carson boxes in the ground wouldn't you need a backflow preventer?

Gilla Gorilla
01-17-2007, 03:58 PM
Using galvanized or copper pipe coming out of the ground makes sense to me. I also thought about driving a piece of 1 1/2" fence pipe into the ground and securing the new water line to the bigger pipe or maybe using a pressure treated 4x4 instead, how does that sound. The other concern that I had was it should need to be winterized like blown out at the end of the season, rite? I was thinking that it would be easiest to do this If I were to use a Y connection at the original hose bib at the house then just run a piece of 1' flexible hose to the new galvanized pipe coming out of the ground. How does this seem or do you guys have any other better suggestions for this.

Dirty Water
01-17-2007, 06:30 PM
We make a swing joint out of 200 PSI NSF Poly and two brass street El's for our yard hydrants. Then we use a T-post driven into the ground and some hose
clamps to secure it.

I'm tired of replacing hydrants that people break by driving into them with their lawnmower.

Gilla Gorilla
01-17-2007, 07:16 PM
Dirty do you have any pictures for me the lamen.

Dirty Water
01-17-2007, 08:32 PM
I made a quick diagram in MS paint, sorry I don't have a picture.

This assembly allows full movement in any direction without stressing the male adapter or PVC.

This is what I do.

Gilla Gorilla
01-18-2007, 06:43 PM
How do you guys price just trenching. It will be rite about 320' of trench. I will most likely rent the trencher attachment for my dingo, it should run $140 to $150 with tax and all for a day.

Thanks

Wet_Boots
01-18-2007, 07:43 PM
"200 psi rated NSF utility grade poly" ??

This might be confusing, since some suppliers employ the word 'utility' to describe their non-nsf tubing. Depending on one's locale, it might be easier to get 160 psi NSF tubing used in wells, most likely made from medium-density poly, which is more than strong enough, and probably easier to clamp to an insert fitting, should you be using them. Lox-on clamps by Ideal will be stronger than any worm-gear clamp, in case you have higher water pressures.

I don't ever charge less than $300 to install poly with a plow, no matter how short a run.

Gilla Gorilla
01-18-2007, 09:15 PM
Okay when you all say use the poly are you saying to use it for the entire run under ground instead of sch 40 pvc in 10' sections? That is what it is sounding like and it does make much more sense to have a 220' straight run of poly versus having to use pvc and glueing it together every 10'

PurpHaze
01-18-2007, 09:24 PM
The PVC we use comes in 20' sticks. :)

Wet_Boots
01-18-2007, 09:27 PM
You are in a freezing climate, more or less. Freezing soil can destroy any grade of PVC, because the material gets brittle, and the soil movement from freezing will not be denied. Poly pipe can stand these forces without damage.

PurpHaze
01-18-2007, 09:50 PM
You are in a freezing climate, more or less.

No I'm not... although we're going through a freeze right now. :)

Better go out and buy all the "fresh" citrus you can because the crop was pretty much decimated. The price WILL be going up. :laugh:

Gilla Gorilla
01-18-2007, 09:50 PM
Cool thanks Wet Boots

So it sounds like I should run 3/4" galvanized from the Y off the bib at the house down into the trench then hook into the 3/4" poly pipe and run that all the way to the end and hook back to 3/4 galvanized up to the new hose bib at the back of the yard.

Did I finally get this rite??? LOL

Wet_Boots
01-18-2007, 11:16 PM
Your call. I use galvanized almost never. Copper costing what it does, galvanized looks more attractive these days. And, perhaps more importantly, if I am including hose bibs like you're describing as a part of a sprinkler system, I have to include backflow prevention as a part of the plumbing. I've had customers who could get by with less expensive antisyphon-valve protection have to spend hundreds extra for a PVB, and the copper pipe I use on either side of it, just because they had to have a faucet somewhere out back. (Fine by me!)


Better go out and buy all the "fresh" citrus you can because the crop was pretty much decimated. The price WILL be going up. :laugh:T'heck wid' that, I go for Temple oranges from Florida! Nectar of the gods!! (Besides, Brazil has tankers of OJ ready to set sail)

Ed G
01-19-2007, 07:31 AM
Temple "oranges" (actually a cross between an orange and a tangerine) will be available early February.

Sorry, no shipments to California or Texas.

PurpHaze
01-19-2007, 08:02 AM
Sometimes referred to as tangelos. :)

Wet_Boots
01-19-2007, 10:31 AM
Tangelos have a grapefruit/pomelo ancestry

Ed G
01-19-2007, 10:49 AM
Wet Boots is darn close.

The hybrid depends on the species of tangelo.

The common tangelo is a hybrid of a tangerine and either a pomelo or a grapefruit.

The better known is the Minneola Tangelo, also known as the "honey bell" - a hybrid of a 'Bowen' grapefruit and 'Dancy' tangerine.

There is also a third type called Orlando Tangelo - originated as a cross between a Duncan grapefruit and a Dancy tangerine.

Honey Bells grow in my area (Clermont/Minneola) like Maple leaves do up north.

Wet_Boots
01-19-2007, 11:16 AM
You can use wikipedia to help parse the differences. For one thing, they give 'tangerine' as a popular name for the Mandarin orange, and 'tangor' as the group of hybrids that include the Temple.

Also, I just learned the California growers of Clementines were all ticked off at beekeepers, when the bees visiting the blossoms would cause the usually-seedless Clementines to develop seeds.

hoskm01
01-21-2007, 08:17 AM
And, perhaps more importantly, if I am including hose bibs like you're describing as a part of a sprinkler system, I have to include backflow prevention as a part of the plumbing. I've had customers who could get by with less expensive antisyphon-valve protection have to spend hundreds extra for a PVB, and the copper pipe I use on either side of it, just because they had to have a faucet somewhere out back. (Fine by me!)




Is this to say that on just a sprinkler system with no hose bib that you need not a PVB???


Sorry to sidetrack the citrus talk, though we've felt the freeze here in AZ as well. Some years we never see a frost, and it was 18 at my house the other night. Lots of plants to replace... Almost 11 nights so far with freezing temps. 3 burst mains into houses we have replaced. Not a big deal most places, would be a heat wave in fact for many, but big news down here in Americas furnace.

PurpHaze
01-21-2007, 08:48 AM
Also, I just learned the California growers of Clementines were all ticked off at beekeepers, when the bees visiting the blossoms would cause the usually-seedless Clementines to develop seeds.

It's been a big issue. They're trying to inact "no bees" zones in some areas. However, without the bees many other trees would go unpollinated.

Wet_Boots
01-21-2007, 11:26 AM
If it comes down to Clementines versus Almonds, the citrus loses.

As far as the hose bib addition requiring a PVB, that would only follow from there being a downstream line under 24/7 pressure, to feed a remote hose bib. Otherwise, it would have only been sprays and rotors, and no downstream valves, and no copper, once the supply gets to the ASV manifold.

PurpHaze
01-22-2007, 08:24 AM
If it comes down to Clementines versus Almonds, the citrus loses.

LOL... Growers tend to stake their own claims and what is good for one is bad for another. :)