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koster_irrigation
02-20-2007, 01:33 PM
For estimates with irrigation and the client doesnt decide to do the install at the time of the quote.

Anyone had any luck with RE sending out the quotes like a year or more after the quote was given. Like stating "We still have this quote on file and could still do this job for X amount" (Of course refigure the job if needed, & if you can still do it for the same out then Ok & that might be a selling point)

Yesterday was a slow day & i resent out about 30 quotes from ranging from 1yr to 3 years back. I pulled property reports on the net to make sure they still lived there.

Green Sweep
02-20-2007, 03:44 PM
We re-send quotes from the current year in November & offer to do the installations at a discounted rate over the winter months. This past year, we selectively sent out roughly 40 letters that generated 6 installs (& 2 landscape lighting jobs ).

It only takes me a few hours to generate the letters via a mail-merge & then add the cost of envelopes & stamps - Definitely worthwhile for us to generate extra work in Jan - March when the weather allows us to work.

DanaMac
02-20-2007, 07:16 PM
We re-send quotes from the current year in November & offer to do the installations at a discounted rate over the winter months.
I never really understood this need to lower prices in the winter. I know it's slower, but it also takes more time to do the work - colder, snow melt turns dirt to mud, workers don't move as fast when cold, etc. I know many companies do it, but I have just never been in favor of it. I personally would charge more. But if you're just trying to keep guys busy, I understand it a little more.

I am used to not working from thanksgiving to mid-March. And I budget accordingly. My employee gets his unemployment during that time. I just don't want to work harder for the same or even LESS money.

bicmudpuppy
02-20-2007, 07:46 PM
I never really understood this need to lower prices in the winter. I know it's slower, but it also takes more time to do the work - colder, snow melt turns dirt to mud, workers don't move as fast when cold, etc. I know many companies do it, but I have just never been in favor of it. I personally would charge more. But if you're just trying to keep guys busy, I understand it a little more.

I am used to not working from thanksgiving to mid-March. And I budget accordingly. My employee gets his unemployment during that time. I just don't want to work harder for the same or even LESS money.

While winterizing a house after the first snow fall, I saw a crew putting in pipe on a bare dirt new house. There was still unmelted snow in some spots. I called the boss and off hand told him about it. I also told him if he had sent me out to run a maxi in that weather, I would have walked.

Remote Pigtails
02-20-2007, 08:23 PM
I am used to not working from thanksgiving to mid-March. And I budget accordingly. My employee gets his unemployment during that time. I just don't want to work harder for the same or even LESS money.[/QUOTE]


How does unemployment work in your state? Do you lay him off he gets unemployment then you rehire? Just curious.

DanaMac
02-20-2007, 09:38 PM
How does unemployment work in your state? Do you lay him off he gets unemployment then you rehire? Just curious.

It is called Job Attached here. He is not technically fired, and since he will be back in the spring, he doesn't have to go through the process of putting in X amount of applications to other companies.

Remote Pigtails
02-20-2007, 10:37 PM
It is called Job Attached here. He is not technically fired, and since he will be back in the spring, he doesn't have to go through the process of putting in X amount of applications to other companies.

We don't have a program like that and someone is going to step in and correct me but in TX I pay 2.7% of the first 9,000.00 for unemployment. Is that low or high compared to yours?

Green Sweep
02-21-2007, 06:22 AM
I never really understood this need to lower prices in the winter. I know it's slower, but it also takes more time to do the work - colder, snow melt turns dirt to mud, workers don't move as fast when cold, etc. I know many companies do it, but I have just never been in favor of it. I personally would charge more. But if you're just trying to keep guys busy, I understand it a little more.

I am used to not working from thanksgiving to mid-March. And I budget accordingly. My employee gets his unemployment during that time. I just don't want to work harder for the same or even LESS money.

I can understand where you are coming from. For us, it is a matter of throwing a bone to the guys who want or need to work. Of course, the job must still be profitable, but the margin is definately lower. Some of the guys welcome unemployment with open arms. For others, it is a struggle. If I can find work for them at least 1 or 2 days per week, then they are allowed to make their 'minimum' & still collect their full unemployment- which helps alot. It also helps me with employee retention.

Remote Pigtails
02-21-2007, 09:07 AM
I never realized the difference so starkly between cold weather economics and warm weather economics.

SprinklerGuy
02-21-2007, 09:25 AM
I didn't understand the cold vs hot cllimate economics until I moved to Colorado....now I understand them all too well :(

That being said, this year should be the year I make enough to relax a bit over the winter....can you say 400 blowouts? Heh Heh...

Remote Pigtails
02-21-2007, 09:38 AM
As part of my semi-retirement plan (or my secret plan to pay for my fishing trips) I was thinking of doing irrigation service in Bozeman MT from April to Oct then servicing long time loyal customers in Dallas from Nov to Mar. I guess I'm going to have to learn about these blowouts.

SprinklerGuy
02-21-2007, 10:59 AM
I had the same secret plan..until I moved to Colorado....decided I enjoyed 4 seasons, got tired of dealing w/ those "loyal" clients in Arizona and sold that company.

Dana Mac is a great teacher of blowouts...check out his seminar at a venue near you...

In fact, he and I will both come to Bozeman to teach you...all we ask in return is river access and beer.

;)

DanaMac
02-21-2007, 11:17 AM
I had the same secret plan..until I moved to Colorado....decided I enjoyed 4 seasons, got tired of dealing w/ those "loyal" clients in Arizona and sold that company.

Dana Mac is a great teacher of blowouts...check out his seminar at a venue near you...

In fact, he and I will both come to Bozeman to teach you...all we ask in return is river access and beer.
I don't think I actually taught you anything for the winterizations. You figured that one out on your own. Not too tough to figure out. Anyone can do it. Wait!! I mean, umm, Yeah it's very difficult, I taught you all you know, and everybody should pay me to teach them!!

I haven't fished in Bozeman, but my brother lives in Bigfork, Montana and I've fished up there numerous times.

Come on tony - we need to go for lunch or a beer soon.

SprinklerGuy
02-21-2007, 12:26 PM
Calling you now.....

irrig8r
02-21-2007, 01:46 PM
I bid an irrigation project last year and even substituting straight 1806's for most of the uneccesary 1812 SAM-PRS heads the LA specified, it came out to over $12,000. The homeowner was a little shocked....she told me the other bids came in at $7,000 to $8,000 supposedly using the original plan by the LA.

I thought she'd picked a contractor until I was in the neighborhood one day about a year later and saw it hadn't been done yet. She had hired a couple of day laborers long term to install fences, some stone walls, etc. that she supervised..

She called me this past November and asked if I'd be available for consulting because she thought her laborers could handle the work.

I countered with an offer to install controller and wiring, backflow preventer, mainline and valves and let them do the rest (including all the trenching and backfilling) even offering a warranty on the parts I would install, and a basic lesson in swing joint and head installation for the guys.

She didn't go for it... Oh well.

koster_irrigation
02-21-2007, 04:30 PM
^ you'll be there to service it one day

Dirty Water
02-21-2007, 04:41 PM
I bid an irrigation project last year and even substituting straight 1806's for most of the uneccesary 1812 SAM-PRS heads the LA specified, it came out to over $12,000. The homeowner was a little shocked....she told me the other bids came in at $7,000 to $8,000 supposedly using the original plan by the LA.

I thought she'd picked a contractor until I was in the neighborhood one day about a year later and saw it hadn't been done yet. She had hired a couple of day laborers long term to install fences, some stone walls, etc. that she supervised..

She called me this past November and asked if I'd be available for consulting because she thought her laborers could handle the work.

I countered with an offer to install controller and wiring, backflow preventer, mainline and valves and let them do the rest (including all the trenching and backfilling) even offering a warranty on the parts I would install, and a basic lesson in swing joint and head installation for the guys.

She didn't go for it... Oh well.

The company I worked for would occasionally make this mistake. To me, its not worth the hassle. Lowballers are a PITA.

Hank Reardon
02-22-2007, 12:21 AM
I bid an irrigation project last year and even substituting straight 1806's for most of the unnecessary 1812 SAM-PRS heads the LA specified, it came out to over $12,000. The homeowner was a little shocked....she told me the other bids came in at $7,000 to $8,000 supposedly using the original plan by the LA.

For my own education, why wouldn't you use 1812's (with SAM-PRS)? Was the site completely flat?

As far as that insane pricing, I'm just finishing a project "renovation" (a 3-year old system by another "contractor") that's more than double your initial bid. How do you make it there? I grew up in San Jo. It ain't cheap!