PDA

View Full Version : clean-up


JG Landscaping
03-26-2007, 07:32 PM
I just got a call the other day from a guy that wants to clear out the mess in his back yard. Someone is already scheduled to come in this week and grind the tree stumps down. After this i need to clear out the leaves and other debris..(sticker bushes) that have already been cut down but still stick out of the ground about a foot. Anyway, the main goal here is to eventually lay down sod. My question is how to get rid of the brush for good with out it growning back through the sod. I know for a fat this stuff is a pain to remove. What should i be lookin at charging for just the clean-up part? I know how to price my clean ups but i dont know how difficult it is going to be to get these sticker bushes out. Any sugguestions would be great all! Thanks in advance.

Drew Gemma
03-26-2007, 09:36 PM
no way man that hill is to steep turn it in to a bed with maybe a small wall up sell. If they get all the stumps you need a 10 tine mulch fork to scoop up grindings and haul out that will take time plus all the leaves I bid that out if you have to wheel in to a trailer out front at about 7 man hours plus a heafty dump fee or 2

JG Landscaping
03-26-2007, 11:38 PM
Either way the sticker vines have to go. Any easy ways of going at it?

Focal Point Landscapes
03-27-2007, 12:07 AM
Its hard to tell from the pictures , but it looks like greenbriar - grows from a tuber and its very difficult to eradicate unless you dig out the tubers , which is very difficult and time consuming . Some tubers can be 12 inches across . If you treat the vine with herbicide upon greenup , it may die but another vine will sprout from another spot on the tuber. They will definately grow through sod.

blakeg314
03-27-2007, 12:10 AM
time to rent a bobcat

GreenN'Clean
03-27-2007, 10:42 AM
bobcat would be the way to go

scagwildcat
03-27-2007, 10:58 AM
what i would do, is rent a machine to get the stumps out, then i would recomend mulch to the owners,due to the fact that the hump or grade change is there for a reason, by taking it out may lead to water problems, for them or the other property, plus it would be less to maintain, it will look nice,and be cheaper in the long run. and lastly not create a drainage problem that can come back and bite you later....

Dreams To Designs
03-27-2007, 11:38 AM
Cleaning out the area will be a good thing, but you will still have intrusion from both sides eventually. Maybe better to dig out what you can, by machine or shovels and axes, grind what you can't get out and plant that area with some color and some shrubs that would screen the view of the school. You will also have to consider the amount of salt during the winter that will be applied to the parking area and driveway that will encroach on your planting area, and plant accordingly. This area would be best served with a native planting, but if your client wants the "clean" look, some small shrubs and mulch may be in order.

Kirk

NNJLandman
03-27-2007, 06:03 PM
Id check the property lines first. I dont know if its jus the thick brush or incline, but everyones fences stop about the same place, might be that buildings property.

Charge and hourly rate, we usually go out on a warm day, spray that area with round up, weedwack the underbrush or use hedge trimmers to chop everything up that the equipment can handle, chain saws & loopers for the rest, mount up the backpacks take care of the leaves, then go through with your weedwacker again and you should be able to ground out the little stems with the weedwacker into the ground, then you can spray again. Lay some weed mat and mulch. All them roots n stuff, youll never get much to grow there.

Jeff

JG Landscaping
03-27-2007, 10:59 PM
If you look in the first picture you'll see the white fence that goes about half way up the hill. You will also notice a very undefined line where the trees stopped being cut down. The prop line is already steaked out, halfway up. Yeah the customer's persistent goal is to sod in this cleared out area (to be)by me with a fence on his prop line. After all of my suggestions he still wants to stay on his mission for sod.....Well the least i can say is "no guarantees" :laugh: I am however going to do my best to make it work the way he wants.
Thanks to everyone who replied!

Dreams To Designs
03-28-2007, 11:15 AM
If it is to be sod. Go in there and get out as much of the scrub and roots you can. Knock the hill down some where it meets the existing lawn, so the transition no longer resembles a speed bump. Have a soil test done, amend with compost and any other nutrients that are lacking, according to the soil test, rototill, spread about 1/2 of the recommended fertilizer and sod. Put the other 1/2 of the fertilizer on top. Your best bet for sod, with the trees and fence, will be a Turf Type Tall Fescue mix with about 10% Bluegrass. Most of the local sod farms have such a mixture, Johnson, Tuckahoe. Water, and as you have said, no guarantees.

Kirk

TheKingNJ
03-28-2007, 06:13 PM
why would you sod that though? why would the customer want to look at the road and building behind his yard? Push arbs, pine trees, fence, berm, poison ivy to keep robbers out, anything but leveling it and opening his piece of the american dream up to rush hour traffic.