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Lynden-Jeff
03-26-2007, 10:00 PM
Hey,

Im looking at a commercial property. The place is a dive, its a pretty straight forward contract. About 4 acres total property maybe 2 acres of grass spread out in many different sections. The downside is 20-30% or more of the grass is on VERY steep inclines, steep enough to be 21" or string trim. I would really rather not have this property however is there anything wrong with over bidding a little and if I get it then its worth my time? I was thinking around $400 a visit, 4 hours for a 3 man crew.

Cheers
Jeff

nick-bigfootlawn
03-26-2007, 10:20 PM
If you really didnt want it, try getting more than $400, I could see $400 if you really wanted it (4 hrs w/ 3 men)!

sildoc
03-26-2007, 10:41 PM
I over bid all the time on things I don't want. the problem is I get more than I usually want because everyone else is overbidding also. I find that after a few visits I find a way to make it quicker than I even thought of. try using a larger walk behind or a hover mower. set in terms that those areas are eow durring growing season and every month out of growing season.
there are ways to do this and still make real good money. This is especially true if you are not doing the work.

General Landscaping
03-26-2007, 10:47 PM
I'd be bidding that much if I was really stoked to get the contract.

But to answer the ?.... Don't turn down work... just charge what it's worth to you. If it's a big pain, then charge accordingly.payup Figure out what you need to make profit then keep adding till you start smiling:)

Precision
03-26-2007, 11:40 PM
Hey,

I was thinking around $400 a visit, 4 hours for a 3 man crew.

Cheers
Jeff

That is $33.33 per man hour per visit. I am thinking you are way cheap, especially if you really don't want it. I would go 50% higher just to be at my desired minimum rate.

NNJLandman
03-27-2007, 12:44 AM
Why not say $500.00, more than likely, others will see your same problem and raise the price...throw a number out there. I always say, "whats the worse they can do...say no to the the price" Plus when and if they say we'll go with your bid, your way ahead and turn a good buck.

Envy Lawn Service
03-27-2007, 12:50 AM
$400 for a 12 man-hour job you don't want?

Dude...
Divide $400 by 12
Then subtract all your direct and indirect expenses

Now... are you even in the black on it?

Rhinox29
03-27-2007, 04:03 AM
I just did this the other day on a commercial bid. Had a bunch of ditches a pond with weeds a mile high around it and a bunch of construction junk laying all over the place and garbage ( very junky). Bad thing is my sister in-law works there and refered me. Found out I was double the winning bid.

Precision
03-27-2007, 09:05 PM
I just did this the other day on a commercial bid. Had a bunch of ditches a pond with weeds a mile high around it and a bunch of construction junk laying all over the place and garbage ( very junky). Bad thing is my sister in-law works there and refered me. Found out I was double the winning bid.

thats the best way to be on those kind. Let someone else ruin their equipment and not make a profit.

causalitist
03-27-2007, 09:54 PM
Hey,

Im looking at a commercial property. The place is a dive, its a pretty straight forward contract. About 4 acres total property maybe 2 acres of grass spread out in many different sections. The downside is 20-30% or more of the grass is on VERY steep inclines, steep enough to be 21" or string trim. I would really rather not have this property however is there anything wrong with over bidding a little and if I get it then its worth my time? I was thinking around $400 a visit, 4 hours for a 3 man crew.

Cheers
Jeff

thats $33 per man/hour ... i wouldnt do it for that even if i wanted it.

prolly $660 .. and i have low overhead cuz im solo

Lynden-Jeff
03-27-2007, 11:43 PM
Well even at $33 per man I would be making a profit. I'm sure I could bang the place off in less then 4 hours, 4 hours was just worse case scenario. I bumped the weekly up to $590, Spring cleanup at $780 and a fall cleanup at $840. See what happens!

Cheers
Jeff

Envy Lawn Service
04-12-2007, 12:30 AM
How's it going?

Lynden-Jeff
04-12-2007, 08:53 AM
Never heard from them lol. Guess I was expensive. Doesn't matter though because now im bidding on a few more commercials.

Cheers
Jeff

GreenN'Clean
04-12-2007, 08:58 AM
I would have said $550 to make it worth your time being there, if they except the offer then you will make out in the long run. Theres nothing worse then under bidding a job you don't want so make the job worth it...

dhardin53
04-12-2007, 11:35 AM
Ether you want the job or you don't. Yes it ok to add some to the price if there are conditions that call for it. You and everyone biding the job has to see the slops and hills to mow and price it accordingly. But to say to anyone your going to "over bid or jack up the price" is bad business. If it get out you over bid to many jobs your reputation will not down as well. You need to choose your works better (just ask Don Imas). No really If your bidding a account and you really don't want to take on the hills, slops, trash, or conditions that you see your better off to just say no thank you and move on. To add money on your bid and say you don't want the job and you end up getting it anyway. Well what kind of a attitude will you have on that account from then on. Ether you want it and take on what ever bad points the account has or you don't. Sorry its just my opinion.

cantoo
04-12-2007, 07:38 PM
What are the total hours you figure on this job?
Is it 4 hours times 3 men which is 12 man hours.
Or is it 4 hours total and you are using 3 men (80 minutes each man) which is 4 hours?
Makes a slight difference.
12 man hours $33 per hour
4 man hours $100 per hour
I'm getting tired of guys saying we should be charging $100 per man hour. Maybe where you live but not here and I'm sure not in most areas either. Got two fliers this week 1/3 to 1/2 acre lot $90 to roll and aerate. Our mowers would be sitting idle all the time. Carpenters get around $30 to $38 per hour here, with tools. A high hoe is $90 per hour. Your going to pay a lawn guy on a $6000 mower $100 per hour. High hoe guy has the hoe, gravel truck and trailer to haul it for $90 per hour.
Some of you guys that are charging upwards of $100 per man hour how much is a hoe in your area? And no I don't mean the nappy headed ho either.

dhardin53
04-13-2007, 08:51 AM
Good point cantoo, and well taken, I agree. My equipment only is making me money if its running and on someones yard mowing. Sitting on my trailer may look good but not making me any money. I have said this before to the guys that will not unload there equipment for less than X amount. Good for you and its a free country and if your local economy is healthy so you can stick to that business practice ok. But please don't make the rest of use feel that we are doing something wrong by keeping our equipment busy.
For the most part i don't get upset about others business practices here, its there right to operate there business as they see fit. And my right to price my mowing to fit my local economy and not low ball but be competitive.

Envy Lawn Service
04-13-2007, 01:02 PM
Good point cantoo, and well taken, I agree. My equipment only is making me money if its running and on someones yard mowing. Sitting on my trailer may look good but not making me any money. I have said this before to the guys that will not unload there equipment for less than X amount. Good for you and its a free country and if your local economy is healthy so you can stick to that business practice ok. But please don't make the rest of use feel that we are doing something wrong by keeping our equipment busy.
For the most part i don't get upset about others business practices here, its there right to operate there business as they see fit. And my right to price my mowing to fit my local economy and not low ball but be competitive.

Well then please allow me to politely 'knock on your noggin' a second while I type and have my lunch.

Yes, while it is true that if the blades ain't spinnin' it ain't makin' money.....

But if your mowers are sitting on your trailer, they are not COSTING you anything either.
Not unless you have a bunch of fixed monthly overhead expenses.
I prime example would be if you have mower payments... or truck payments, etc...

And if that's the case, sorry.
Yeah, in that case you are sort of over a barrel sometimes.
You have to "account" differently for that.
You have to add all that expense up, and then divide it by your work hours.
AND... sometimes you might have to dip down and do work for that margin to make bills.
Otherwise, something ain't getting paid.

This is precisely WHY you see some companies out doing low margin "busy work".
Just something to stay in the black a little and make 40 hour payroll to keep the workers happy.

This is also precisely why I choose NOT to run my business this way with this sort of accounting.

So-So-So-So-So many people just seem to completely fail to see the big-big evil of 'SERVICE-BASED' business and try to operate one like a retail business.

And that big evil is.... the more you do... the more it costs you.
And that doesn't run on much of a declining scale like it does in retail.
You may be able to shave your fixed expenses some in rare cases via high-volume.
But your operational expenses stay the same and are only multiplied by your activity.

If you haul that mower out, fire it up and use it, it costs you the same thing per hour in haul expense, fuel, depreciation, wear and tear, consumable parts, etc... and if it has an employee operator it costs you the same wages every hour.

You have to be a massive-massive operation to stack enough dollars together from a high-volume/low-margin scheme to make any money to speak of. Bigger than we will ever be or ever care to be.

$33 a man hour for a 3 man crew sure as hell ain't the formula to achieve that!!!

By the time you subtract the travel, labor, operational expenses, and a portion to cover the fixed overhead expenses, you might get lucky and make a few bucks. Break-even maybe for such an operation. But if you could multiply that thousands of times over, nationwide, all day every day, then yeah, then you might stack together enough dollars to do very well.

Myself, being small and staying small compared to that scale... I have better things to do than chase my own tail to break even. Since I don't have high fixed expenses like detailed above, I can pretty much accomplish that sitting on the couch rather than working low-margin... and it's a whole lot easier.

So if I go out on an estimate where I'm personally going to be involved in the field workload... I'm going to make expenses and make a nice wage for my company and myself... otherwise, as you put it, I'm not going to unload for it.

I'm not even going to 'front' either... it's pretty darn often that I can't get my rate and I don't unload. Someone else is often more hungry than me or more often, less business savy. And that's the way it goes. So I struggle a lot more than some to stay as busy as I want to be.

And if it ever gets to the point where I can't stay busy enough while making what I want to make for the work I do... well then I find something else to do. Simply put, running a lawn & landscape business is high-expense. The work involved is hard, hot, dirty, and something most normal people would rather not do once a week... and many of us owners do it all day every day... plus all it takes to manage/run a business too... and there is really little freedom in it during the season.

I love this work and all, but I'm not selling myself short either.
I'm not going to do it unless there is a substantial income involved.

alwaysgreenirrigation
04-13-2007, 02:14 PM
I bid normally at $50 per man hour..(solo).....so I would price it a little higher. But each of us has different "price of doing business". But i bid crap properties high a lot if not that interested in them!

green horizons
04-13-2007, 07:30 PM
Pricing is so variable. Location, growing season, customer demands... It never ends. I think $33/man hour is reasonable for "mowing". Remember that employees have a cost/hr., but even if one pays employees well, it likely will be less than $33/hr. My point is, an owner will make money on each "man/hr". I recommend bidding what the job is worth to you. As for post #15... Please use spell/ grammar check or the like. It was hard to follow/read.

Loy's Home Services, LLC
04-13-2007, 07:43 PM
Heck, I bid high on stuff I want. I just think my co's worth it.

dforbes
04-13-2007, 10:02 PM
I don't look at it as overbiding, i see it as charging what you need to make money on the job. You should charge extra for areas that require smaller mowers, extra weedeating ect. I also agree that it would be hard to make money at $33.00 per hour with employees, but only you know your cost of doing business. Just make sure you are figuring everything.

Envy Lawn Service
04-14-2007, 01:49 AM
Well, if you think you can make money with a 3 man crew charging $33 per man hour...

Well, you'd be well served to just go ahead and find something else to do for 'a living'.
Less painful to get it over with now... because you're NOT going to make a living at this.

If you like this type of work get a job as an equipment operator for another LCO.
Successful owners are always overjoyed to employ such people.

Most of them would much rather pay you a good wage than see you hurting the local market and yourself.

green horizons
04-14-2007, 09:08 AM
Each business and business location is different. I don't believe anyone here can say absolutely what will be profitable. The more money the better, but I'm not going to beat somebody down and tell them no way, now how, find another line of work. Perhaps constructive criticism would better suit the original poster...

topsites
04-14-2007, 09:16 AM
I learned my lesson, never overbid a price shopper's estimate, because in the wild hare case they say YES, you can have one big headache on your hands. You're better off thanking them for the opportunity, and have a nice day or some such thing.

In the case of contracts, they're always price shopping, that is one important thing to remember, lowest bidder wins.
In those customer's minds, there is a preset value you work against, and it's worse with associations (or groups), all it takes is one or two out of the 100-some members to ruin your day.
Now in the odd case of an exception where an association decides one day they won't hire the cheapest guy this year, you had better run anyhow, because they're still price shoppers, regardless of quote, once a price shopper = always a price shopper.

The problem is, if a customer thinks the job is worth $20 and the normal price is $60, in their mind it's still worth $20 regardless of the quote, give them a price of $120 and in their mind they fabricate that you must be doing 6 times the work of everyone else! They just might say yes, then they make sure to be there because they HAVE to see this, and you try and skedaddle out of there within the hour and they're standing right there doing this :nono:

Now you're stuck, they cry and whine or moan and groan until enough has been done that they feel they got their money's worth, it is a matter of matching value for money here, and if the customer has an attitude of $20 pmh labor then that is what they will be expecting... And if you're a $60 pmh guy, even if you do 3-4 times the work in one hour of the $20 pmh guy, my best advice is do NOT bid this job because the price shopper is a clock watcher and usually fails to appreciate what actually got done, and you can't squeeze blood out of a turnip.

Lol, ain't no way. Look, best I can figure is contracted jobs are best meant for large companies who have a number of employees (at least 10 full time) and need a way to keep a few of them busy at various times. Then it's no big deal to send Jim and Bob over to that place for the day, the Lco makes little profit (if any) but it keeps his workers busy and out of his hair, also it gives that Lco what I call 'show time,' meaning hours where his workers are out and about doing something in a high visibility location (or preferrably so).

Beyond that, I don't find contracts lucrative for the solo operator, I might just as well go back to work for someone else, the money's about the same. I just tell them my company doesn't submit bids, or I send them a polite no-bid letter (which some companies can accept a no bid as one of the 3 bids they're required to get).

supercuts
04-14-2007, 09:18 AM
your probably tired of hearing it at this point, $400 seems underbiding to me at 4hrs with 3 man crew. go higher

Duekster
04-14-2007, 09:39 AM
$400 for a 12 man-hour job you don't want?

Dude...
Divide $400 by 12
Then subtract all your direct and indirect expenses

Now... are you even in the black on it?
I just lost a job. $1,750.00 per month including winter over seed, irrigation repairs, mowing and trash pick up and dead plant liability.

Obviously things like a mainline break or a dead tree from mechanical damage not caused by us was excluded.

The guy picked it up for 1,100.00 per month.

It took two guys about 4 hours total, 3 guys could do it in just under 3 hours.

I just think there are some other dynamics here which I am not going to talk about in depth but I doubt the manager actualy knows what the Corporate contract includes and as a result neither does the low bidder. Not sure either really cares. Sounds like to me the price was just on mowing labor with nothing else considered.

Envy Lawn Service
04-14-2007, 12:58 PM
I just lost a job. $1,750.00 per month including winter over seed, irrigation repairs, mowing and trash pick up and dead plant liability.

Obviously things like a mainline break or a dead tree from mechanical damage not caused by us was excluded.

The guy picked it up for 1,100.00 per month.

It took two guys about 4 hours total, 3 guys could do it in just under 3 hours.

I just think there are some other dynamics here which I am not going to talk about in depth but I doubt the manager actualy knows what the Corporate contract includes and as a result neither does the low bidder. Not sure either really cares. Sounds like to me the price was just on mowing labor with nothing else considered.

Yeah, that happens to me on a regular basis and it is very typical for that exactly to happen.

There's always someone that doesn't bid to the specs. Then there are those that just lowball it without realizing.

In the end though, the result is always the same.
I used to keep it prestine... grass cut once a week... everything else maintained to the point that nothing landscape-wise ever looked like it needed doing.

Then the new crew comes in. They do a spring app of 10-10-10 and start mowing. By the first month in the new outfit has realized "oh crap"!

You start to see the "round-up trimming & edging" and corners cut.

In the end, it's always one of those deals where they don't do anything but show up randomly at 7-10 days, and then 10-14 days to stretch and skip a cut when they can..... and none of the other work ever gets done period.

CRF500
04-14-2007, 01:16 PM
I am getting 75 to 100 $ a man hour on my new accounts, 33$ an hour YOU ARE CRAZY!

Duekster
04-14-2007, 01:26 PM
I am getting 75 to 100 $ a man hour on my new accounts, 33$ an hour YOU ARE CRAZY!

It is good if you can get it but every market is different.

Duekster
04-14-2007, 01:28 PM
Yeah, that happens to me on a regular basis and it is very typical for that exactly to happen.

There's always someone that doesn't bid to the specs. Then there are those that just lowball it without realizing.

In the end though, the result is always the same.
I used to keep it prestine... grass cut once a week... everything else maintained to the point that nothing landscape-wise ever looked like it needed doing.

Then the new crew comes in. They do a spring app of 10-10-10 and start mowing. By the first month in the new outfit has realized "oh crap"!

You start to see the "round-up trimming & edging" and corners cut.

In the end, it's always one of those deals where they don't do anything but show up randomly at 7-10 days, and then 10-14 days to stretch and skip a cut when they can..... and none of the other work ever gets done period.


I guess the other point is about $35.00 hour is about all the Market in Dallas Texas will bear. However, our season is longer too.

Envy Lawn Service
04-14-2007, 05:02 PM
Each business and business location is different. I don't believe anyone here can say absolutely what will be profitable. The more money the better, but I'm not going to beat somebody down and tell them no way, now how, find another line of work. Perhaps constructive criticism would better suit the original poster...

Well yeah.... but I guess I am just a little exhausted of typing out the constructive criticism that these guys don't ever take into consideration.

They are all convinced they are getting rich with their gross numbers.

Yes, every area is different and in some areas it's near impossible to get a fair rate at this (because of people like them). I should know... I'm in such an area. An area where most average workers have never made $10 an hour in their life.

While what you are able to get easily will vary greatly across the country, direct operational expenses are pretty stable..... Trucks, trailers, mowers, handheld equipment, fuel, oil, filters, blades, belts, tires... and the list goes on.... and if the currency is US Dollars, it all costs relatively the same thing about anywhere you are.

If you are smart with these purchases, sure you can have lower overhead than the next guy. But you can only get so low. And that doesn't apply to most new guys (or experienced guys either) because most keep shiny new stuff, and have a matching monthly payment for everything they use.

I guess the other point is about $35.00 hour is about all the Market in Dallas Texas will bear. However, our season is longer too.

I understand that... heck it won't bear that here.

But the bottom line is, I don't care where you are in the USA...
Billing $35 a man hour for mowing isn't making you any money.
You can't run a business, pay an employee and furnish him equipment for that an hour.
Not unless you are just hauling him around with you and all he does is run small equipment.
But put him in a truck towing a trailer hauling a ZTR... different story...

I had a good friend here in the business I tried to preach the same thing to. But it was falling on deaf ears. He was set on trying to bid jobs where he could gross $35 a man hour for himself and his helper. He was BUSY too, and for some reason still scared to death to bid more, even though I encouraged him along and got him to get $80 a man hour on some of his work.

He just couldn't shed that mindset.

He started with good productive equipment, and the monthly cashflow method of accounting. His truck and trailer was paid for, and he was 'accounting' monthly equipment payments. Then subtracting for other direct things like fuel, blades, etc... and just 'cash' wages. His main machine was an efficent diesel, only burning 1/2 - 3/4 gallon of fuel an hour... and he was buying bulk off-road diesel from an oil company... the works...

So the way he was accounting, his overhead was about as low as you can get really and still have atleast one reliable productive piece of equipment.

After a season, he went in debt for another small homeower ZTR in hopes of boosting his numbers up better. Halfway through that year, even with these accounting methods he began to realize he had a BUNCH of accounts he was literally going in the hole on every time out.

Basically, by the time he subtracted his drive out, fuel expense, portion of the monthly equipment payments, portion of misc normal wear supplies, and his wages for his employee, he realized his employee was the only one making anything on the jobs.

With some help from me, he made it through the season, but failed early into the next when he lost some of his profitable work to lower lowballers.

In the end,he survived a couple of seasons, but he worked his arse off, he put a lot of wear and tear on two lawnmowers and a set of handheld equipment he was still making payments on. He ragged out his nice 1/2 ton pickup, run the miles up, tore the transmission out of it, and had to put 70-some model truck on the road as his tow truck.

Some folks should take some lessons from his painful mistakes.

Vikings
04-14-2007, 07:25 PM
Hey,

Im looking at a commercial property. The place is a dive, its a pretty straight forward contract. About 4 acres total property maybe 2 acres of grass spread out in many different sections. The downside is 20-30% or more of the grass is on VERY steep inclines, steep enough to be 21" or string trim. I would really rather not have this property however is there anything wrong with over bidding a little and if I get it then its worth my time? I was thinking around $400 a visit, 4 hours for a 3 man crew.

Cheers
Jeff


12 man hours for 2 acres of grass? and you got a Z! half an acre you gotta use a 21" cause its sloped but still.

I'm very inexperienced but I would have thought that to be 4-5 hours, 6 at the most.

green horizons
04-14-2007, 08:57 PM
I suspect that 12 man hours is excessive for this size of property. The 33/man hr is based on the estimate supplied. Everyone wants to focus on 33/man hr, but what if the time for service were cut in half? Now it's 66/man hr. It's odd that many jump on and say "....you can't make money at 33/man hr". Nobody has told him what to charge. How can we? Markets vary, the property hasn't been viewed, the estimate for man hours is suspect. Three guys running push mowers and string trimmers grossing $100/hr... Yes, I can turn a profit. Would I like more? Who wouldn't. This site is great, but answers about prices range from asinine low to obsurdly high.

thefed
04-14-2007, 11:17 PM
I think 33/man hr (400 for this job) might not be too far off...

12 man hours @ 10/hr = $96-120

Gas? 10 to get there, 15 for equipment

Maintenance- 30/visit for misc stuff like oil/belts/reg maint

So far I'm at $175 expenses....of course you have the normal overhead of truck,insurance,blah blah


But if you cant make a decent buck with those #'s above...with guys working FOR you and bringing you home the $$$....your overhead is WAY to high,imho...or your standards are...

Duekster
04-15-2007, 08:47 AM
Well yeah.... but I guess I am just a little exhausted of typing out the constructive criticism that these guys don't ever take into consideration.

They are all convinced they are getting rich with their gross numbers.

Yes, every area is different and in some areas it's near impossible to get a fair rate at this (because of people like them). I should know... I'm in such an area. An area where most average workers have never made $10 an hour in their life.

While what you are able to get easily will vary greatly across the country, direct operational expenses are pretty stable..... Trucks, trailers, mowers, handheld equipment, fuel, oil, filters, blades, belts, tires... and the list goes on.... and if the currency is US Dollars, it all costs relatively the same thing about anywhere you are.

If you are smart with these purchases, sure you can have lower overhead than the next guy. But you can only get so low. And that doesn't apply to most new guys (or experienced guys either) because most keep shiny new stuff, and have a matching monthly payment for everything they use.



I understand that... heck it won't bear that here.

But the bottom line is, I don't care where you are in the USA...
Billing $35 a man hour for mowing isn't making you any money.
You can't run a business, pay an employee and furnish him equipment for that an hour.
Not unless you are just hauling him around with you and all he does is run small equipment.
But put him in a truck towing a trailer hauling a ZTR... different story...

I had a good friend here in the business I tried to preach the same thing to. But it was falling on deaf ears. He was set on trying to bid jobs where he could gross $35 a man hour for himself and his helper. He was BUSY too, and for some reason still scared to death to bid more, even though I encouraged him along and got him to get $80 a man hour on some of his work.

He just couldn't shed that mindset.

He started with good productive equipment, and the monthly cashflow method of accounting. His truck and trailer was paid for, and he was 'accounting' monthly equipment payments. Then subtracting for other direct things like fuel, blades, etc... and just 'cash' wages. His main machine was an efficent diesel, only burning 1/2 - 3/4 gallon of fuel an hour... and he was buying bulk off-road diesel from an oil company... the works...

So the way he was accounting, his overhead was about as low as you can get really and still have atleast one reliable productive piece of equipment.

After a season, he went in debt for another small homeower ZTR in hopes of boosting his numbers up better. Halfway through that year, even with these accounting methods he began to realize he had a BUNCH of accounts he was literally going in the hole on every time out.

Basically, by the time he subtracted his drive out, fuel expense, portion of the monthly equipment payments, portion of misc normal wear supplies, and his wages for his employee, he realized his employee was the only one making anything on the jobs.

With some help from me, he made it through the season, but failed early into the next when he lost some of his profitable work to lower lowballers.

In the end,he survived a couple of seasons, but he worked his arse off, he put a lot of wear and tear on two lawnmowers and a set of handheld equipment he was still making payments on. He ragged out his nice 1/2 ton pickup, run the miles up, tore the transmission out of it, and had to put 70-some model truck on the road as his tow truck.

Some folks should take some lessons from his painful mistakes.

What was the base wage for the guys you are talking about?

I mean easy example - regular yards pay about 30.00 you can do 5 every 2 hours with a 2 man crew. equals about $37.50 per hour.

When I bid a commercial job you bet I consider windshield time.

ED'S LAWNCARE
04-15-2007, 10:58 AM
I just bid on a apartment community (very nice bldgs) the grounds were neglected. The only thing nice is the entrance. There were 21 bldgs each bldg had a common area that is inaccessable, you actually need to have a 10 ft ladder to go down to trim the shrubs. For a clean up I bid $7200 and monthly service after $2650. The grass equals only to about 1.5 acres, but alot of shrubs. I went real high because I really don't want it, but if I get it at least I will be paid well.