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View Full Version : Hunter Micro-Spray Conversion


PurpHaze
04-02-2007, 11:59 PM
Started work today on converting our last drip system in the district. We pulled out all the PE and are in the process of converting to hardpipe and the Hunter Pro-Spray 6" bodies with Micro-Spray nozzles. We completed the first section and it's working quite well. What made it easier is that 15 years ago when we originally installed the drip we hardpiped to each section and then converted to PE via tees to water each section. Here's some pics.

bobw
04-03-2007, 12:19 AM
Damn, I hate to see anyone using side inlets.... mind you, you don't have the winterization issues that we do...

gusbuster
04-03-2007, 12:22 AM
Hayes,
How comparable are these Hunter micro's to R.B's xeri sprays.

Do the nozzles itself retract completly....haven't seen any micro's from hunter at Ewing, JDL or Horizon. Horizon pushes the Xeri nozzles from R.B.

As always, good looking work......even if it's my tax dollars at work:)

Wet_Boots
04-03-2007, 12:35 AM
How are those nozzles materially different from the smallest ordinary spray nozzles, with radii as small as 5 feet?

Remote Pigtails
04-03-2007, 08:38 AM
Why did the drip fail?

Remote Pigtails
04-03-2007, 08:40 AM
I probably should know this but I'm drawing a blank. What does PE stand for?

Wet_Boots
04-03-2007, 08:55 AM
PolyEthylene

PurpHaze
04-03-2007, 09:03 AM
Damn, I hate to see anyone using side inlets.... mind you, you don't have the winterization issues that we do...

All the trenches are being hand dug (too many plants and the "main lateral" runs through the sections) so we're going only as deep as necessary. :)

PurpHaze
04-03-2007, 09:08 AM
Hayes,
How comparable are these Hunter micro's to R.B's xeri sprays.

I've never used the Rainbird xeri sprays so I can't say. We've tried the Rainbird spray nozzle that accepts the Hardie Maxi-Jet but they stick up and easily break off. Not worth it.

Do the nozzles itself retract completly....haven't seen any micro's from hunter at Ewing, JDL or Horizon. Horizon pushes the Xeri nozzles from R.B.

The nozzles themselves have a spring in them and retract also. When the sprinkler riser goes down the whole unit is flush just like a spray head.

As always, good looking work......even if it's my tax dollars at work:)

We aim for the long haul. :laugh:

PurpHaze
04-03-2007, 09:13 AM
How are those nozzles materially different from the smallest ordinary spray nozzles, with radii as small as 5 feet?

Guess it depends on which 5' nozzle you want to compare them to. Smaller orifices that put out small GPM. At 40 PSI they put out: quarter = .14 GPM; half = .28 GPM; full = .56 GPM. Guess you'd also have to compare precipitation rates.

I'm only working with a 3/4" CL 200 "main lateral" but I'll be able to get all three sections completed under my 10 GPM target. The first section has six sprinklers in it and I've only used 1.28 GPM so far.

PurpHaze
04-03-2007, 09:19 AM
Why did the drip fail?

Basically due to lack of servicing (no work orders submitted) and PE that has popped out of the ground and broken/sliced 1/4" PE tubing/emitters from shovels, weedeaters, hula hoes and the like. All this leads to more clogging down line. Basically lack of money and personnel to keep the planters up. In the old days we used to have a "Utility Crew" that went around keeping planters and other things up. They carried drip parts and fixed things as they went. Ever since they were cut out of the budget planters and parking lots have gone downhill.

Mike Leary
04-03-2007, 05:18 PM
I feel your pain, nice work to replace the junk. I believe the Hunter minis have a retraction feature...they look cool & I believe the lowest percip. rate
you can get.

Remote Pigtails
04-03-2007, 09:16 PM
PolyEthylene

I bet I never miss that test question again.

Drip is high maintenance. I'm redoing my system to as much drip as possible to see first hand what the struggle is. The problem I run into most often among customers is yard crew damage, squirrels, and finally rats and mice.

PurpHaze
04-03-2007, 11:49 PM
Drip is high maintenance.

Believe it or not the system we're converting presently is the last drip system we installed in the district back in '93. We unsuccessfully tried to get our boss to stop having us putting it in prior to that to no avail. When I finally supplied him with records showing just how high maintenance it is in a school district situation (debris and cuts in a drip system repair time = almost same time to rip it out and hardpipe everything) he finally capitulated. It's almost like we've come full circle.

Our previous method of conversion was using strategically located standard spray pop-ups but those areas had much more available GPM than what we're currently working on. The current project entails 7 planter areas that were originally all drip. We'd successfully cut two areas off that were already on a separate valve so we were just able to switch it to a spare wire and install the spray pop-ups.

We finsihed the three large planters around the front of the office today which was the site's main concern due to asthetics and it had to be done when school was not in session (spring break this week). We cut away the remaining two planters in front of the nearby kindergarten building and will install a new valve on the main line by it and run large enough pipe so we can either use standard sprays or the micro-sprays. Until we get that done the site guy will water the plants via a QCV (many were strategically set on the system when we originally installed) and hose.

One of the few remaining drip areas in the district is at a school that installed it themselves in a rose garden area about two years ago. They were advised that they were on their own for future repairs as we would not repair it. They've had nothing but problems with cut lines and emitters since.

Here's a couple of more pics from today's work.

Remote Pigtails
04-04-2007, 08:16 AM
My advice to customers that wanted it was to learn about it and install it themselves. The reason being the maintenance factor. Right now drip is becoming more popular in this area because of water restrictions. I feel this is the last weak area in my irrigation knowledge so I've decided to tackle it. I like the concept of watering plants not space. The customer education factor is very time consuming and billing for it hit and miss. I do think the quality of material has improved a lot since the early 90s. One reason I decided to tackle it is because the Wmtic clock with the weather monitor will up the watering time and I don't have to explain to customers that drip needs loooooong run times.

PurpHaze
04-04-2007, 11:03 AM
The advantages of drip systems is well proven in that they deliver water to a specific spot for a specific reason. We used it in conjunction with a mulch ("walk-on bark") to keep weeds down and at first everything was working well. With the reduction of weeds the maintenance impact to drip was minimal because no one had to go into the planters constantly for weed control. However, as the cost of mulch replacemment was factored in (walk-on bark walked off) it was replaced less frequently and weeds started taking hold thus requiring mechanical maintenance which in turn started destroying the drip systems. It was at this time that we discontinued the use of drip and went to hardpiped spray heads. Of course there are disadvantages to spray heads but weed control now consists of a combination of herbicides and mechanical means and the amount of system damage is way down.