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ant
07-27-2001, 05:33 PM
why are the lawns that are being watered in the pm looking good?
it does not make sence to me.
ant

Avery
07-27-2001, 06:30 PM
Why does this not make sense to you? :confused:

Eric ELM
07-27-2001, 06:52 PM
I have my system set so it turns on about dawn. This is supposed to be the best time, but my neighbor waters his in the evening. His lawn looks great too. I guess when it's as dry as it is here, the grass doesn't even care when it gets watered, as long as it gets watered. :)

smburgess
07-27-2001, 07:10 PM
The reason behind watering in the a.m. is really two fold; it helps prevent fungus (when watering late evening/night) and wasting water through evaporation (watering in afternoon). The turf itself doesn't care when it gets watered, it'll use it anytime.

wallzwallz
07-27-2001, 07:32 PM
I believe it's best to water at dawn,for above reasons,also recall something about insect population increasing watering at night.Like I said it's best at dawn but in the real world, water any time is better than no water. I have 1 account so big it's a 14 hr cycle on the irrigation, so we run it from 7 pm to 9 am. lawn looks good

Mike Wall

lawnboy82
07-27-2001, 08:17 PM
i must ask this, why are we talking about when to water during the day when we have an irrigation system. when the right way to run an irrigation system is with a moisture meter built into the system. with a moisture meter, when the water level gets down by PWP the system turns on. when you are up by FC the system stays off. that sounds like the most effective way to water.

powerreel
07-27-2001, 08:29 PM
Atlanta Braves have bowls under their turf that they can fill and rotate via PC. In the fryin' heat keep as much water in the turf as you can, then fry out a couple weeks prior to fall rains.

wallzwallz
07-27-2001, 08:53 PM
so if the water got down to pwp? at noon time would that be most effective time to water? you still have to set a time+ water can be expensive some places so you want to use min. gals for max absorbtion. The device your talking about would be nice for some of my customers who insist on watering every nite.

Mike Wall:D

lawnboy82
07-27-2001, 10:48 PM
well i mean i am just saying that that is the best way to do it. instead of watering when you dont need to. however you are right about watering. about 5 am or so is a good time. probably the best time. but golf courses i believe use this system.

HBFOXJr
07-30-2001, 09:45 AM
Any time after midnight is as acceptable time to water.

1. least evaporation- get the most of what your buying or pumping
2. minimum wind drift- water goes where it is supposed to with highest degree of uniformity
3. least conflict with daily activities
4. NO! it doesn't cause or promote fungus. Many fungal pathogens require a free bead of water standing on the plant tissue for 16 or more hours in order to penetrate and infect the plant. Under most conditions even the zone that goes off at midnight will be dry long before 4 pm the next day.

Moisture sensors

Many municipalites have regulations regarding watering days and times. I see or have heard of every 2nd or 3rd day, and 3 days per week. In our area it can be dictated by geographic area or house number (odd/even). Some municipalties or water companies have no restrictions at all.

I've tried to work with municipalites and water companies in the past. They are not the least bit interested in what could be better. They want simple rules they can give to everyone and subsequently enforce.

Consequently the combination of a moisture sensor and a controller set to a schedule is not a viable option. The sensor could call for water on an off day and the lawn could be short of moisture for a day or two until your get a legal day again. If the system needed to run for several days in a row to get to field capacity it could not do so.

Very few people really understand any of this except in golf and commercial, agricultural production in areas that depend heavily on irrigation. This is all way beyond homeowners, government, water utilities and most contractors.

Regulations in our area are designed to conserve water. My opinion and observations are that at cerawtin times of the year it actually increases water usage because people feel they must water if they have a legal day. If your watering every 2nd day and skip a watering your lawn will wait 4 days for a drink when maybe 3 would have been the right amount.

I can't even get my customers to change the run times as we go through the year. No one wants to "manage" their system or site. Set and forget is the attitude.

smithsonmi
07-30-2001, 10:44 AM
I agree with the above with one point. Ever go outside in the summer and walk through the grass at 1am? How dry is the grass? It is WET! Might as well water when you sleep.

HOMER
07-30-2001, 10:49 AM
When I had a lawn that was waterable I always watered late in the afternoon or at night. I knew this way the moisture would stay in the ground longer and allow the grass to use it to the fullest. I see systems running in the middle of the day! If there was ever a waste that has to be it. The lawns that are watered at noon are still dry and look terrible. I never had a fungus problem either, never bought that and still don't.

HBFOXJr
07-30-2001, 11:15 AM
Originally posted by HOMER
When I had a lawn that was waterable I always watered late in the afternoon or at night. I knew this way the moisture would stay in the ground longer and allow the grass to use it to the fullest. I see systems running in the middle of the day! If there was ever a waste that has to be it. The lawns that are watered at noon are still dry and look terrible. I never had a fungus problem either, never bought that and still don't.

I don't know diddly about southern turf and the diseases that affect them. I can only speak about the transition area and north.

65hoss
07-30-2001, 12:56 PM
Another problem with watering in the evening is for those people who believe in watering everyday. If you have standing water all the time you drown the roots. No oxygen can get in. I water mine in the evening but only 1 time per week. I deep water only. Time constaints allow for evenings only. But I have only had to water 2 times all year. We have had enough rain to keep mine dark green and growing all year. :blob3: :blob4: :blob1:

KirbysLawn
07-30-2001, 01:26 PM
The key to all this fungus stuff is nighttime temps. If you don't think night time watering promotes fungus water often when the night temps are at 72 degrees and up and see what happens, first mushrooms, then the patch....

I'm really suprised there is such a debate about this.

HBFOXJr
07-30-2001, 02:26 PM
Originally posted by KirbysLawn
The key to all this fungus stuff is nighttime temps. If you don't think night time watering promotes fungus water often when the night temps are at 72 degrees and up and see what happens, first mushrooms, then the patch....

I'm really suprised there is such a debate about this.

Rutgers University here in NJ recommends the after midnight watering. I've done this 30 years and have a degree in horticulture.

Fungus is more common under the conditions you mention because that's the condition it likes not because your watering at night.

Turf under stress is the most subject too disease. Stress comes in diffferent forms such as high temperature day and or night, high humidity, too much to too little water, incorrect soil fertility, poor mowing practices etc.

I manage many lawns and the ones with proper fertility, adequate moisture and good turf varieties seldom have problems worth treating.

I do use some fungicides if it looks like it's getting out of control but try to address the other issues that favor disease to minimize use in the future.

smburgess
07-30-2001, 07:26 PM
I'm sorry, I'm with Kirby.

I've read too much from too many different books, websites, etc., that watering at night will promote fungus. I just viewed a few college websites that also agreed with kirby. However, if in thirty years you haven't had a problem, GREAT!

John DiMartino
07-30-2001, 08:18 PM
Nighttime temps in the 70's,and high humidity scare me,and other golf course superintendents,after the 1st night,with a a repeat forcast for the next night,we go scrambling for some pythium medicine,Subdue,or Fore.I'd rather have "the patch" 5 times,than pythium once,its a fast mover,and wrecks everything in its path in hours.Bentgrass can get it,and rye gets it even easier.

CMerLand
07-30-2001, 08:24 PM
Ive got the same info as FOX from the same source but with a further explanation.

The reason for overnight watering being safe is that once the air temperature hits the dew point in the early evening hours the fungus has all the moisture it needs to do its damage. The key is limiting how long the turf is wet which is why late afternoon/early evening hours are not recommended as it will extend the time leaf blades are wet.

As I mentioned in a post about disease under pest apps. to get a disease you need to have a fungus triangle. The pathogen, a susceptible host and the proper enviromental conditions. If one of these isnt there then you have no disease problems. You can not get brown patch with underfertilized turf in the cool spring weather. Dollar spot will not likely develop on a chemlawn due to the excessive nitrogen apps.

Bluegrass is less susceptible to red thread then perennial rye.

Keep in touch with those extension services to keep you up to date with the latest information on this and other topics affecting our industry.