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View Full Version : This is gonna sound stupid, but...


mulchmaster
04-04-2007, 02:33 PM
This may sound stupid, but I have a question. I have a large mulch job set for fri and sat and we have a freeze warning for the next couple nights, lows in the low to mid 20's. I wandered if I should hold off untill next week, for two reasons. 1 Somewhere I heard you should not mulch if the ground is frozen, 2. we are planting perennials and I don't want to put them in just yet, due to the cold temps. I don't think that it will get cold enough to really freeze the ground, but I would like to hear what you guys think. This is a new customer, and I want to keep her happy, but I don't want to screw anything up.

PaperCutter
04-04-2007, 03:33 PM
We don't typically plant perennials before May 1, and we're a lot warmer than you guys in OH.

Never heard the mulch thing. Any idea why they say that?

Dave

mulchmaster
04-04-2007, 03:55 PM
I am not sure what it would hurt, but that's just what I heard.

I agree with not planting the perrenials untill later, but you know how some customers are. She just moved in last fall and wants it done asap.

Thanks andrew

delphied
04-05-2007, 06:41 AM
You will have dead plants if you plant now. You prolly are a month too early on the plants,maybe even 6 weeks unless they get covered when needed. Up here in Michigan we can get frost in the first week of june and that kills em.

DiyDave
04-05-2007, 07:15 AM
If you mulch over frozen ground, it will take longer for it to thaw out, and you will be planting into ice cubes!

green horizons
04-05-2007, 04:39 PM
The mulching should be fine, but the plants won't appreciate the weather. Will they die? Maybe, maybe not. But they are perennials, and if you don't plant them, they'll just be sitting at the nursery waiting for the next landscaper. I'd advise the customer to wait (even if only a week). If they don't go for the dealy, document your gaurantee (of lack there of) and supply the products and service.

fishman644
04-06-2007, 08:03 PM
There will be plenty of time for the ground to thaw. I wouldnt consider planting until at least the first of may

Mike33
04-06-2007, 10:57 PM
I agree they will die. But 3 years ago i watched 1 our premier landscapers plant a new bank for opening in jan. His guys actualy had to use pics in the frozen ground and planted spierra, orn. grass, evergreens, etc. and they all did well. If i would try that they would of all died.
Mike

BD Bone
04-07-2007, 11:56 AM
I have had concerns about putting mulch down w/the moisture and snow because of mold concerns. That would be the only reason for holding off on that too. I agree w/the perennials... to delay the planting. But, to elaborate on Mike33's comment about the landscaper planting in Jan... some types of trees and ornamentals are "dormant" during late fall and winter and contrary to belief, that is one of the best times to plant. Now, this is not the case for every plant/tree or every situation and of course it depends on how cold or how much ice. If in doubt, consult the nursery for one of their experts to advise you and make recommendations. Ideally, we obtain our plants from a large nursery and for us to meet warranty requirement, you must follow advise on planting to receive any warranty should the plants die. Just an FYI.
Good luck

Mike33
04-07-2007, 10:24 PM
I have had concerns about putting mulch down w/the moisture and snow because of mold concerns. That would be the only reason for holding off on that too. I agree w/the perennials... to delay the planting. But, to elaborate on Mike33's comment about the landscaper planting in Jan... some types of trees and ornamentals are "dormant" during late fall and winter and contrary to belief, that is one of the best times to plant. Now, this is not the case for every plant/tree or every situation and of course it depends on how cold or how much ice. If in doubt, consult the nursery for one of their experts to advise you and make recommendations. Ideally, we obtain our plants from a large nursery and for us to meet warranty requirement, you must follow advise on planting to receive any warranty should the plants die. Just an FYI.
Good luck
Thanks for reading and commenting on my post. That was actually done and i couldn;t belive it. But you made a point i never thought of about some being dormat and not hurting them.
Mike

tthomass
04-07-2007, 11:20 PM
I don't warranty perennials, annuals, house plants, roses......typically not seed or sod either. If the perennials are dormant, what difference does it make if they're frozen in a pot or in the ground. If they are being brought out of a warm greenhouse, I do not suggest planting them.

PSUturf
04-08-2007, 08:45 PM
When planting into frozen ground you run the risk of creating air pockets when backfilling if the soil is dug out in frozen chunks. The only concern with putting mulch down when the ground is frozen is that it will take longer for the soil to warm up enough for plant growth to occur.

The comment about mold concerns if mulch is put down over snow or wet ground doesn't make sense. The soil / mulch will get just as wet after a heavy rain.

packer101
04-08-2007, 08:50 PM
i find it funny in general how many homeowners have us deliver mulch and call to cancel because it might rain or be cold becuase they dont want to cover it. where do they get the idea they need to cover it... we have like 6000 yards wide open to the weather and they see it but assume they need it covered and than look at me liek im crazy when i say they dont need to.... i just dont get it...



but mulch would be no problem its wood no harm done it can be put down when ever you want with no problems atall.... plants atleast here its still to early to plant enless your talking bulb plants which would be ok in most cases because they can take te cold... most other plants here need until about the nights stay above 40...