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View Full Version : Diesel Fuel Alternatives - BioDiesel B20 Fuel


TPLawnPro
04-04-2007, 03:54 PM
I'm not sure about the rest of you that own diesel powered trucks and machinery, but I have had it with the ridiculously over-inflated cost of diesel fuel! :hammerhead: The price for a gallon of diesel fuel here in South Louisiana is averaging around $2.83 per gallon.

I am now to the point that I am seeking alternatives to petroleum-based diesel fuel. Upon further research, I was amazed at how many legitimate BioDiesel fueling stations that there are popping up all over the country - that is, they are in some parts of the country more so than others.

I guess my question is this. Do any of you diesel truck owners use alternative diesel fuels such as B20 Bio Diesel? If so, how much does it typically cost per gallon as compared to the outrageous price of petroleum-based diesel?

*trucewhiteflag*

fool32696
04-04-2007, 07:16 PM
the only times I've seen biodiesel blends, its been more expensive than the petroleum product

Eclipse
04-04-2007, 08:44 PM
Everytime I have purchased B20 it has been more expensive than 100% dino diesel.

spray_man
04-04-2007, 09:06 PM
You can make bio diesel from used restaurant oil (about 70 cents cheaper without counting your time) or even use the the oil directly in your vehicle (not as easy as it sounds). But, when you factor in your time, expense, and risk of damage to your engine, Diesel would have to go to $10 dollars per gallon to be worth it.

I have a friend that runs his motor home - er - old bus on straight used restaurant oil. However, he is retired with a pension, and has a lot of time on his hands. Also, recently he blew the motor on it. He swears up and down it was not a result of the grease, but, I don't buy it. The money he saved on the home made diesel, he spend ten fold on a new engine.

Don't listen to the hype. When you run the numbers. It does not compute.

LawnScapers of Dayton
04-04-2007, 09:14 PM
I just paid $2.98 for B20.....

tnmtn
04-04-2007, 09:39 PM
i am looking forward to seeing more biodiesel available. don't have the time to distill it myself. have heard nothing but good from friends that run it. the lubricity factor should help with the new lower sulpher diesel.

Dirt Digger2
04-04-2007, 09:51 PM
problem with bio is it has been know to foul engines...theres a real good article in "Diesel Power Magazine" on bio-diesel vs. you warranty. I've run it once in our Jeep Liberty and the performance is the same and the one time i ran it (about 3 months ago) the price was comparable to reg. diesel...i imagine as more fueling stations pop up the price will drop but the price of corn and beans keep rising so thats not helping either...its funny, i'm actually just beginning a research paper on bio-diesel and ethanol blended fuels...i'll have to let you know what i find as far as prices go when i get to that part of my research.

TPLawnPro
04-05-2007, 11:33 AM
Thanks for the feedback everyone. :waving:

I look forward to the results from your research Dirt Digger 2.

dwc
04-08-2007, 09:30 PM
I run B20 Soy Biodiesel a lot and it makes my truck run better. I have heard it lubricates better than dino diesel. The cost is the same as regular diesel.
It will take a while for the Biodiesel field to really take off for prices to come down much.
BTW, I have a Dodge Ram with the Cummins.

Rizzo
04-08-2007, 09:46 PM
They seem to be building one after another of biodiesel and ethanol plants around this area so it must be catching on. One guy just finished one plant and is starting another one just to keep up.

mosmgras
04-09-2007, 10:53 PM
I've been running B100 Homebrew in all my equipment for over two years now with no problems. I've got about $1k invested in processing equipment that will produce 50 gallon batches daily. Best I can figure, it requires about an hour, or so, of time over the course of several days to produce a batch. My processor is setup like an assembly line. As the product is moved from one stage of the process to the next, it is replaced by product from the previous step. This way, I have a continuous supply of finished fuel.

stroker51
04-11-2007, 11:13 PM
I've been running B100 Homebrew in all my equipment for over two years now with no problems. I've got about $1k invested in processing equipment that will produce 50 gallon batches daily. Best I can figure, it requires about an hour, or so, of time over the course of several days to produce a batch. My processor is setup like an assembly line. As the product is moved from one stage of the process to the next, it is replaced by product from the previous step. This way, I have a continuous supply of finished fuel.


This is exactly how I would like to set up a little stil at my shop. Please go on, where'd you get you equipment, etc.

1cooltreeguy
04-11-2007, 11:31 PM
I've been running B100 Homebrew in all my equipment for over two years now with no problems. I've got about $1k invested in processing equipment that will produce 50 gallon batches daily. Best I can figure, it requires about an hour, or so, of time over the course of several days to produce a batch. My processor is setup like an assembly line. As the product is moved from one stage of the process to the next, it is replaced by product from the previous step. This way, I have a continuous supply of finished fuel.


Hi, can u post pics? Where do you get your supplies to make it? Sounds good-Please Help.

mosmgras
04-12-2007, 08:35 AM
-New 80 gallon water heater from Lowe's (main processor)
-85 gallon cone bottom tank from Plastic Products (separation/mist wash tank)
-Four 85 gallon steel drums from a local oil supplier (2 bubble wash tanks, 2 drying tanks)
-Misc. hoses and plumbing fittings from Lowe's and McMaster Carr

As for supplies, my methanol comes from the same local oil supplier as the drums did. I order my KOH online from www.braintan.com Used oil comes from restaurants in my area that are willing to part with it. I rigged up a 300 gallon tote with a 2" water pump on a small trailer to collect. I have another tote at home that stores the oil until needed.

Dirt Digger2
04-22-2007, 11:04 PM
ok i did a little reearch...biodiesel has a detergent property so anything higher than a 20% blend (B20) will cause the sediments in your fuel lines to move and clog your filter so you need to keep and eye on them...another interesting thing i found was that with the new diesel fuel they cut out sulfur which is a big lubricator of diesel engines, so they reccommend atleast a 2% blend because bio-diesel has huge lubricating beniefits for diesel engines...a 2% blend increases the cost per gallon by 2-3 cents mainly because it takes a little longer to produce...then i got tired, wrote my paper, and didnt research anymore...hope you find some of the stuff interesting...i thought the lubricant part was suprising

Eclipse
04-22-2007, 11:14 PM
Just a couple comments...

Any amount of Biodiesel will help clean the deposits in your fuel system. The higher the percentage the quicker the cleaning.

Sulfur is not a lubricant. The reduction in lubricity is from the process that removes the sulfur, not the actual sulfur itself.

dwc
04-23-2007, 07:18 PM
Dodge sent me a magazine the other day and it says they have been fueling all Cummins powered trucks with B5 from the factory since January. They also say they are ok with B20 if it is from a reliable source.
Thought it was interesting.

WalkerMowing
04-29-2007, 08:42 AM
Our growers CO-OP sells just a 2% mix that my friend uses. He notices better mileage and slightly better performance. You can actually smell the difference in the stuff. It is usually about the same as pump fuel maybe a few cents cheaper.

As mentioned you might as well change your fuel filter often especially in an older truck.

If you go to biodiesel.org there is a lot of info of their site. I think it is their site that even has a locater for fuel stations that sell Bio.

tallrick
04-29-2007, 12:19 PM
My dad's old Mercedes has been running on fryer oil for a couple of years now. Start with Diesel, run on oil, shut down with Diesel and all works great. The mileage improved, and the diesel smell and soot all but vanished. Love the pleasant fryer aroma but boy does it make my hungry! Biodiesel is a good idea, but the chemicals added to thin vegetable oil can cause failure in rubber or plastic parts used in the fuel system. You are very unlikely to blow an engine, but you could damage the expensive fuel pump and/or injectors if the oil is not heated properly before running. In short if you're not mecahically inclined don't bother. You will spend more in repairs than you save in fuel. Do it right and you'll be driving for free practically!

K&M Lawn Care
05-06-2007, 01:38 PM
I have been running B20 in my 2006 F-250 since October 2006. Every time I have bought it, it has been withing 2 cents of regular diesel at the same station. For the last 4-5 times I have filled up it has been running 2 cents cheaper. A couple of days ago, I paid $2.61 for B20 and regular unleaded was at $2.79.