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Green Boys LawnCare
04-13-2007, 12:29 PM
This may be a little off topic, but has anyone else had this problem. I'm fairly new to lawn treatments. I do a lot more mowing. Because of all the rain and how busy I am in the spring, I end up doing my lawn treatments when it's wet out and I can't mow. Being out in the wet grass all day my feet got really soaked, pruned up, and even got blisters because I kept going. Anyone aware of any socks, type of shoes that may help? Thanks

barefootlawnsandlandscape
04-13-2007, 12:38 PM
Try some muck boots, or other rubber boots. That is what I wear when I am applying. I also wear some water proof pants that I got from the local golf store.

HazellLawnCare
04-13-2007, 03:57 PM
The rubber boots are the way to go when you are spraying lawns. When I am just on a wet lawn though I have a pair of Nike tennis shoes that have been applied with gortex. I think they are actually hiking shoes but they are waterproof and comfortable.

ant
04-13-2007, 04:55 PM
you will love them.. they are a sponcer of this forum..
http://www.lawngrips.com/product-page.aspx?ProductID=1

RAlmaroad
04-13-2007, 07:12 PM
Go to one of the marine stores (West Marine/Boater's World) and buy some storm boots (Yellow). There're not too expensive but real comfortable. A pair of foul weather pants and you'll be set. Skip the yellow hat and slicker unless you want to be seen as the Gorton's Fisherman guy. I've used one pair of boots for seven years now.

RAlmaroad
04-13-2007, 07:15 PM
Ant: I've seen those and they'd be great for fertlizer etc, but your feet would stilll get wet and contaminated by pesticides. Boot may be better.

indyturf
04-13-2007, 10:24 PM
You should always wear rubber boots when your doing chemical applications!

Runner
04-13-2007, 10:36 PM
What in the heck are we talking about???? Are you guys talking about actually spreading pesticides and getting wet feet? If you are spreading pesticides in ANYthing else but chemical resistant boots, that is just nuts. you don't wear regular rubber boots, you don't wear yellow "muck boots", you don't wear "lawngrips" or whatever they are, - even if they ARE a sponsor of this site, and you SURE don't wear tennis shoes. This is just lack of common care and sense when it comes to the use of pesticides of ANY type.

HazellLawnCare
04-13-2007, 10:54 PM
Exactly runner. I was talking about the rubber boots from lesco when i am spraying. As for mowing and getting wet feet I love my waterproof nikes.

vegomatic40
04-14-2007, 10:36 AM
Yes, we only wear butyl/rubber boots, calf-length, no laces or leather to absorb pesticides. Since they are so inexpensive ($25-$35/pair) they are routinely replaced when they get "funky". Steel-toed boots are not normally necessary as they do tend to get considerably colder in the toe area during cold weather. LabSafety Supply has a ton of different types with various grip/lug patterns. Tingley makes a excellent rubber over-boot that can be worn over a old pair of tennis shoes during warmer weather to minimize how hot your feet will get. I'm looking for someone that makes a decent pair of calf-length socks that won't end up sliding down your legs and ending up in a ball at the toe. Anyone that has done this job for any length of time knows the frustration of having that &%@+()! pair of socks LOL. I've thrown those away many times and replaced them at mid-day only to get a equally-crappy pair. Insoles can help some but they tend to slide around and bunch up as well.

unit28
04-14-2007, 02:14 PM
I worked for a company that just provided pull overs.

My feet were wet and when I pulled the rubber pullover off.
I poured out
at least 10 oz of it everyday.

You run your butt off, you'll sweat and get wet from pants being soaked
around the ankles.

I tried all kinds of crap.
Let me know what works.

MStine315
04-14-2007, 08:25 PM
What in the heck are we talking about???? Are you guys talking about actually spreading pesticides and getting wet feet? If you are spreading pesticides in ANYthing else but chemical resistant boots, that is just nuts. you don't wear regular rubber boots, you don't wear yellow "muck boots", you don't wear "lawngrips" or whatever they are, - even if they ARE a sponsor of this site, and you SURE don't wear tennis shoes. This is just lack of common care and sense when it comes to the use of pesticides of ANY type.

If you're doing lawn "treatments," I can only assume you're using a pre-emergent. Read the label. It will typically recommend rubber, chemical resistant boots. Remember, the label is the law. If the dept. of ag. stops you, you have to have the proper protective equipment, per the pesticide label.

sprayboy
04-14-2007, 09:51 PM
This may be a little off topic, but has anyone else had this problem. I'm fairly new to lawn treatments. I do a lot more mowing. Because of all the rain and how busy I am in the spring, I end up doing my lawn treatments when it's wet out and I can't mow. Being out in the wet grass all day my feet got really soaked, pruned up, and even got blisters because I kept going. Anyone aware of any socks, type of shoes that may help? Thanks



If you are doing chemical apps without rubber boots are you not wearing gloves either?

Rlclawnguy
04-16-2007, 10:33 AM
How many of you wear those rubber boots while driving your PG

Grassworks Inc.
04-16-2007, 10:49 AM
Gempler's Brown Bear boots are real comfortable rubber spray boots. Put a gel insole in them and they're nice all day long. They're mid-calf height, and you can cut them down if you like em a bit lower. Gemplers nitrile spray gloves are nice too. You need your head examined if you're applying turf chemicals (dry or granular) or spraying trees without proper boots and gloves.

grandview (2006)
04-16-2007, 03:41 PM
I've used these for 20 years.

americanlawn
04-16-2007, 09:18 PM
Re-entry statement regarding dry products = 0. This means anybody can walk on the grass whenever they want and as soon as they want.

If you are applying a granular product in early spring (typicaly pre + fert), I recommend "duck shoes". Shop around. Walmart, "farm supply stores", etc.

When the lawns aren't mushy, try walking shoes by New Balance (black).

It pays to read the labels, cuz often you can avoid unneccesary inconveniences and improve your employees' dicomforts.

We use Dimension + fert. NO BOOTS required. Actually NO clothing requirements are suggested on the label.

Don't bother with the fireman boots if you're using a dry product.

Liquids are a different story.

Hope this helps. Bottom line: read the label so no bad guys catch ya.

Runner
04-17-2007, 01:28 AM
Grandview,
What are those? Except for the cloth laces (which is ludicrous), they look pretty decent.

Five Star Lawn Care LLC
04-17-2007, 09:12 AM
I've used these for 20 years.

those boots look pretty clean for using them for 20 years!

:dancing:

grandview (2006)
04-17-2007, 02:39 PM
I wish they were 20 years old.They're from Lesco depending how much you do you can get a season or 1.5 seasons out of them.

M.C.L.C.
04-17-2007, 06:18 PM
How many times do you actually visit a lawn to put down a granular without spraying the lawn for weeds? If you do any spraying at all most liquid chemicals say to wear chemical resistant boots. Would u seriously change out footware three times at one stop? No. Where the chemical resistant boots...department of Ag isn't very lenient when it comes to doing exactly what the label says!!!!

Hogjaw
04-17-2007, 09:19 PM
Been spraying about 12 years and wet feet is a very uncomfortable way to spend the day......and probably not healthy either.

The moisture from the liquid applications will ruin a pair of Red Wing boots....I know from experience.

Bought me a pair of Muck non-insulated boots, probably 8 to 10 inches high. Very comfortable. Feet sweat a little. Am anxious to see how they handle the Arkansas heat and humidity.

At least my feet aren't greenish blue from the die in the spray anymore.

Victor
04-18-2007, 12:27 AM
Been spraying about 12 years and wet feet is a very uncomfortable way to spend the day......and probably not healthy either.

The moisture from the liquid applications will ruin a pair of Red Wing boots....I know from experience.

Bought me a pair of Muck non-insulated boots, probably 8 to 10 inches high. Very comfortable. Feet sweat a little. Am anxious to see how they handle the Arkansas heat and humidity.

At least my feet aren't greenish blue from the die in the spray anymore.

Hey Hogjaw. You should try some "Alpha Burly's." They're really comfortable. They hug your ankle, so your socks don't get pulled down. I used to hate wearing spray boots, but love these boots, because it's almost like wearing tennis shoes around all day for me.